Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

John Attanasio

Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

SMU Law Professor Daniel ShumanDaniel Shuman, M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, will be remembered for his work as a renowned legal scholar, but he was much more to his students.

“He was a caring mentor to so many of us, right up to even the last week of his life,” says Clarence Wilson, who recently achieved a scholarship with Shuman’s help. Shuman, 62, died Tuesday, April 26, 2011 of multiple system atrophy, a rare neurological disorder.

SMU’s Health Law Association (HLA) has announced that it will raise money for a plaque to serve as a lasting tribute to Shuman’s dedication.

Shuman was the inaugural M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law at the law school and a member of the faculty for more than 33 years teaching torts, evidence, law and social science and mental health law.

“The Law School family has suffered a great loss and our thoughts and prayers are with the Shuman family right now,” says Law Dean John B. Attanasio.

Shuman was a nationally and internationally respected scholar in two separate fields, says colleague and HLA advisor Thomas Mayo, associate professor of law. “Early in his career he did groundbreaking empirical research on the attitudes and behaviors of juries, and he followed that with the best research and writing on law and psychiatry anyone has ever done. His productivity and quality were at the highest levels for an incredible three decades.”

Earlier this year, Shuman received the 2011 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The recognition – shared with psychiatrist Liza Gold – honors their book, Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace: Model, Process, and Analysis (Springer, 2009), as an “outstanding contribution to the literature of forensic psychiatry.” The award will be presented during the APA’s annual meeting May 14-18 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

“Institutionally, he shaped the present and future course of the law school as the long-time chair of the faculty appointments committee, and he was extremely helpful to the development of our young faculty,” Mayo adds. “Students adored him.”

One of those is Juris Doctor candidate Isaac Haas, who says, “Professor Shuman was passionate about teaching his students to look beyond mere memorization and understanding of the law and consider the consequences of the decisions we make as a community about right and wrong. And while he was a brilliant scholar and writer, what set him apart as a teacher was the interest that he took in me and so many others.

“Very rarely would I ever leave a conversation with Professor Shuman without him asking about my other classes, job prospects, wife or son,” Haas says. “I am incredibly grateful for the time I spent with him, and with his wife, Emily, as a student, teaching assistant and friend.”

The family has requested that memorials be made to the Texas Voice Project for Parkinson Disease.

To contribute to the HLA’s memorial gift for Shuman, contact Alex Berk.

Written by Denise Gee

May 2, 2011|News|

Faculty in the News: March 8, 2011

Jake Batsell on CBS-11 NewsJake Batsell, Journalism, Meadows School of the Arts, provided expertise for a CBS-11 News story on tweeting and sports that was broadcast March 6, 2011. Watch Jake Batsell on CBS-11. video

Ed Fox, JCPenney Center for Retail Excellence, Cox School of Business, talked about the possible effects of rising commodity prices on Dallas-area consumers with The Dallas Morning News Feb. 22, 2011.

Bud Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, wrote that the current turmoil in the Middle East should be taken as a sign the United States should develop and maintain a complete portfolio of domestic energy sources in an article that appeared in The Hill Feb. 22, 2011. He also wrote about the potential of natural gas locked in shale formations in a story published by The Washington Examiner Feb. 18, 2011. In addition, he wrote about this resource’s potential impact on the Texas economy in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram article published Feb. 28, 2011.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about the political implications of Texas’ changing demographics with The Houston Chronicle Feb. 18, 2011, and with The New York Times Feb. 25, 2011. He also discussed with The Canadian Press the political fallout from President Obama’s instruction to the U.S. Department of Justice to stop defending the Defense of Marriage Act, which prohibits same-sex marriage. The article was published Feb. 28, 2011, and appeared on numerous Canadian news sites.

Peter Weyand, Applied Physiology and Wellness, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, provided expertise for a story about how fast humans may eventually be able to run that appeared on National Public Radio Feb. 19, 2011.

Linda Eads, Dedman School of Law, talked about Texas lawyers’ vote against proposed amendments to the state bar’s Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct with Texas Lawyer Feb. 17, 2011.

John Attanasio, Dean, Dedman School of Law, provided expertise for a National Law Journal story on the successes of an SMU program that pays law firms to “test drive” new Law School graduates. The article appeared in the Feb. 28, 2011 edition.

March 8, 2011|Faculty in the News|

SMU alumna, women’s rights pioneer Louise Raggio dies

 Vivian Castleberry, Louise Raggio and Gov. Ann RichardsLouise Ballerstedt Raggio – renowned Dallas attorney, SMU Distinguished Alumna and national figure in women’s rights – died of natural causes on Jan. 23, 2011, at age 91.

Raggio’s work on passage of the Marital Property Act of 1967 ended the archaic requirement that Texas women turn over control of their personal finances and real estate to their husbands upon marriage.

A memorial for Raggio is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 30, at First Unitarian Church, 40105 Normandy Avenue in Dallas. Visitation will be from 5-7 pm. Saturday, Jan. 29, at Sparkman/Hillcrest Funeral Home.

A photograph of Raggio’s 1952 graduating class from what is now SMU’s Dedman School of Law tells her pioneering story better than words: Sitting on the front row, she was the only woman in the group. Raggio was the first woman assistant district attorney in Dallas County and the first woman to prosecute a criminal case here.

Over her lifetime, Raggio did more to ensure the protection of women’s legal rights in Texas than any other person in history, and the lecture series established in her name at SMU continues to celebrate her tremendous accomplishments.

“As a pioneer on behalf of women’s legal rights, Louise Raggio was a role model to generations of students and colleagues and a fearless advocate for her clients. The SMU lecture series named in her honor brought to campus other innovative thinkers on women’s issues, from journalists and authors to public officials,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “By remaining active at SMU, she ensured that young people understood the struggles of the past and are prepared to address unresolved issues for equality and equity in our society. Her impact is immeasurable. We are all better for her leadership and courage.”

The Louise Ballerstedt Raggio Endowed Lecture Series in Women’s Studies played an important role at SMU after friends and family established it in her name in 1988. The series consistently brought to the University nationally renowned leaders on gender and women’s issues, and featured such speakers as author and feminist Gloria Steinem, former U.S. Surgeon General M. Joycelyn Elders, former Texas Governor Ann Richards, former CIA agent Valerie Plame Wilson and Teach for America founder Wendy Kopp.

The Women’s Studies Program of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences was home to the Raggio Lecture Series until 2010, but the Dedman School of Law recently became host to the series named for one of its most successful and beloved graduates.

“We are very saddened at Louise’s passing,” said John Attanasio, Judge James Noel Dean in SMU’s Dedman School of Law. “She was a champion for the rights of women and for the rights of many others across this state and all across the country. We are very proud to call her an alumna.”

Raggio received the SMU Distinguished Alumni Award in 1971 and was named a Dedman School of Law Distinguished Alumna in 1992, 40 years after her graduation. The University conferred its highest honor upon Raggio in 1996, presenting her with an honorary Doctor of Laws.

Raggio also has been honored by her sons – Grier, Tom and Ken Raggio – through the Remember the Ladies Campaign, which seeks to endow an archivist position dedicated solely to supporting the Archives of Women of the Southwest Collection in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Raggio’s own papers are part of the archive, which includes the writings, photographs and other records of notable women leaders who acted as pioneers in social and political reform movements, businesswomen who paved the way for future generations to succeed in the workforce, and influential women in the arts and voluntary service. The archive also houses papers recording the daily life of women in the 19th century.

Above, Louise Raggio ’52 (center) with friend and fellow women’s rights pioneer Vivian Castleberry ’44 (left) and the late Texas Governor Ann Richards at an SMU Raggio Lecture in 2003. Photo by Clayton Smith.

> Learn more about Raggio’s life in an 8-minute video video
> Find more information and links at SMU News

January 24, 2011|News|

Guildhall, Dedman Law host summit for video game industry

Games-Business-Law Summit logoVideo game industry leaders will share insights on evolving legal and business issues during the 2010 Games::Business::Law Summit, set for Jan. 27-28 in the Hillcrest Room of SMU’s Underwood Law Library.

Hosted by SMU’s Dedman School of Law, The Guildhall at SMU and The Center for American and International Law, Game::Business::Law will bring top game industry leaders, developers, publishers, lawyers, and members of the venture capital and financial industry from around the world to discuss current business trends and legal issues in the games industry.

Jay Cohen, president of development with Jerry Bruckheimer Games, will serve as the keynote speaker. SMU Law Dean John B. Attanasio and Guildhall Executive Director Peter Raad will provide opening remarks.

Conference officials have confirmed Gregory Short, executive chairman of Electronic Entertainment Design and Research, and Delores M. Etter, director of SMU’s Caruth Institute for Engineering Education, as featured speakers. Short’s talk, “Innovations in the Due Diligence Process for Funding and Greenlighting Games,” will be presented at lunch on Jan. 27. Etter will speak on “Innovation Using the Skunk Works Philosophy” at the Founders Dinner that evening, using three studies SMU students have recently conducted for the U.S. Marine Corps and Lockheed Martin.

Other scheduled speakers include:

  • Zack Karlsson, NAMCO BANDAI Games America, Inc.
  • Chris Charla, Foundation 9 Entertainment
  • Bob Loya, Activision Blizzard
  • Joe Minton, Digital Development Management
  • Roxanne Christ, Latham & Watkins, LLP
  • Keith Boesky, Boesky & Company
  • Stephanie O’Malley Deming, XLOC
  • Alex Marquez, Intel Capital
  • Andrew S. Ehmke, Haynes and Boone
  • Jennifer Archie, Latham & Watkins, LLP
  • Jason Kee, Entertainment Software Association
  • Shane McGee, Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal, LLP
  • PJ Putnam, Gearbox Software

Mark Methenitis of The Vernon Law Group will facilitate a round-table discussion on the financial and legal crossroads of digital delivery with guest speakers Robin Bynoe, Charles Russell, LLP; Sean F. Kane, Kane & Associates LLC and Jeffrey A. Levenstam, Ernst & Young.

Read more from SMU News
Visit the Games::Business::Law Summit homepage

January 26, 2010|News|

Faculty in the News: Summer 2009

Brian StumpScientists in SMU’s Seismology Research Program deployed monitoring stations in North Texas during summer 2009 to gather data on a series of earthquakes that began hitting the area in May. Brian Stump (right) and Chris Hayward, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, are providing expertise to local and national media outlets for ongoing coverage, including the following stories:

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked with the media regarding several state and national political stories during the summer, including:

William LawrenceWilliam Lawrence (right), Dean, Perkins School of Theology, provided commentary on the health care reform debate and other issues, including:

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, spoke with several media outlets about fuel prices, the Congressional climate change bill and other energy issues for these stories:

Scott MacDonald, Southwest Graduate School of Banking, Cox School of Business, talked about distressed banks taking the cost-cutting measure of closing branch locations with CNNMoney.com Aug. 12, 2009.

Ruben Habito, World Religions, Perkins School of Theology, talks about the increasing acceptance of Buddhism among Christians and Jews who infuse Eastern spiritual insights and practices into their own religions with The Denver Post Aug. 9, 2009.

Kathy Hargrove, Gifted Students Institute, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, spoke about the need for specialized training for teachers of the gifted and talented with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 9, 2009.

Al Armendariz, Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, discussed air quality problems in Denton County with The Denton Record-Chronicle Aug. 2, 2009. In addition, he wrote an op-ed on the failure of the North Texas clean-air plan and its consequences for The Dallas Morning News, published July 13, 2009.

Jeff TalleyJeff Talley (at right in photo, with Gen. David Petraeus), Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, was the subject of a feature detailing his ideas for using engineering to fight global poverty. It appeared in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram July 29, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, provided expertise for a story on health care rationing and the author’s 91-year-old father that appeared in Politics Daily July 29, 2009.

William Maxwell, Finance, Cox School of Business, talked about the state of the American auto industry with The Dallas Morning News July 13, 2009.

John Attanasio, Dean, Dedman School of Law, discussed why Dallas’ law practices have managed to avoid the downsizing occurring at many large national practices with The Dallas Morning News July 6, 2009.

Nathan Cortez, Dedman School of Law, discussed the legal and regulatory uncertainties of “medical tourism” – seeking affordable health care abroad – with Diversity: Issues in Higher Education June 25, 2009.

Darab Ganji and Robert Jordan, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, wrote an op-ed on the post-election uprising in Iran that was published in The Dallas Morning News June 22, 2009.

Fred Schmidt, Christian Spirituality, Perkins School of Theology, discussed the June 2009 meeting of representatives from Episcopal congregations and dioceses to create a new denomination for a story published by The Fort Worth Star-Telegram June 22, 2009.

Glenn Griffin, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed the advantages and drawbacks of the state opening its new “Don’t Mess With Texas” video contest to the public with The Dallas Morning News June 17, 2009

August 18, 2009|Faculty in the News|
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