Faculty in the News: Oct. 5, 2010

James Guthrie

Faculty in the News: Oct. 5, 2010

Metin Eren, a graduate student in archaeology in Dedman College, says trampling by animals may skew the dates on stone artifacts. An article on his research was published in National Geographic Daily News Sept. 29, 2010.

James Guthrie, George W. Bush Institute senior fellow and professor in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, wrote an op-ed on education issues raised by the recent film “Waiting for Superman” that was published in The Christian Science Monitor Sept. 29, 2010. He and David Chard, dean of the Simmons School, provided commentary for an article on a Bush Institute initiative to improve the performance of school principals, in which SMU will participate. The story was published by The Associated Press Sept. 29, 2010.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, talked about the practice of parents selecting the gender of their children prior to birth with NBC 5 News Sept. 23, 2010. video

October 5, 2010|Faculty in the News|

Faculty in the News: March 16, 2010

Dennis Simon, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about the White House push for health care legislation with The Washington Examiner March 16, 2010.

Al Niemi, Dean, Cox School of Business, discussed anticipated growth for the U.S. economy – and the possibility that North Texas will outpace it – with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram March 2, 2010. He also talked about why businesses leave states, and why North Texas stands to gain from projected departures from California, with The Dallas Morning News March 15, 2010.

Michael Cox, O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom, Cox School of Business, talked about the economy and the appeal of North Texas with The Dallas Morning News March 14, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the March party primaries, the races for governor in Texas and the chances for Democrats in the fall with CNN March 3, 2010. On the same day, he also spoke about the Texas governor’s race and the politicians involved with KERA Radio 90.1 FM. Read the story and listen to the discussion. audio

In addition, Jillson provided expertise for a story on anticipated candidate spending in the 2010 midterm elections that appeared in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram March 13, 2010. He also discussed post-election political prospects for U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison and speculation on whether she will resign her seat in a WFAA TV Channel 8 broadcast that aired March 11, 2010. Read the full story and watch the news clip. video

Peter Raad, The Guildhall at SMU, talked about the Guildhall-cosponsored Indie Game Challenge and the Guildhall’s goals and achievements with GamerLive.TV during the 2010 D.I.C.E.™ (Design, Innovate, Communicate, Entertain) Summit in Las Vegas in February. Watch the video. video

Fred Moss, Dedman School of Law, provided expertise for a Dallas Morning News column by James Ragland about the Don Hill public corruption case. The column appeared March 3, 2010.

James Guthrie, senior fellow and director of education policy studies for the George W. Bush Institute and a faculty member in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, discussed the qualities that make a good teacher and how to improve the quality of education with The Dallas Morning News Feb. 27, 2010.

David Meltzer, Anthropology, Dedman College, provided expertise for a commentary on climate change and the weather by journalist Lee Cullum that was broadcast on KERA Radio 90.1 FM Feb. 26, 2010. Read and listen to the full commentary. audio

March 16, 2010|Faculty in the News|

Former President Bush defines focus of new institute

Laura and George W. BushFormer President George W. Bush told an SMU audience Nov. 12 that the George W. Bush Institute will focus on education, global health, human freedom and economic growth. The Institute will be part of the Bush Presidential Center, which will include the presidential library and museum.

Construction on the center will begin in fall 2010, but the institute’s first initiatives are under way with the selection of key leaders and plans for conferences beginning this spring.

“The Institute will be a vital hub of critical thought and practical action,” Bush told about 1,500 SMU faculty, students, staff and presidential library donors at McFarlin Auditorium. “It will be independent, nonpartisan and designed to make an impact in the world.”

The Institute first will focus on education reform, beginning with the appointment of nationally renowned education scholar James Guthrie to serve as the institute’s director of education policy studies; he will serve as senior fellow at the institute. Simultaneously, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development announced that he will hold a concurrent appointment as professor in the school, the first such appointment to be made between SMU and the Bush Institute.

Guthrie is currently Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy and director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University. He joins the Institute and the University on Jan. 1, 2010

Sandy Kress, national education leader and former Dallas Independent School District board chair, also will serve as education fellow at the Institute, directing education policy development and outreach.

Guthrie and Kress will lead a national education conference in March 2010 on education leadership, policy and school reform.

In addition, as part of the Bush Institute’s focus on economic growth, including energy independence, the institute will partner with the Maguire Energy Institute in Cox School of Business to host an April 2010 conference focused on the benefits of natural gas production in the United States.

In the area of global health, Bush announced the appointment of Ambassador Mark Dybul, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator from 2006 to 2009, as the institute’s first global health fellow. Dr. Dybul will retain his position as distinguished scholar at Georgetown University. In both capacities he will research strategies to provide comprehensive health services to mothers, newborns and children in impoverished African and Asian countries.

“This is an area where research is urgently needed,” Bush said. “I’ve charged Mark with saving as many lives as quickly as possible.”

The institute will support human freedom with the creation of the Freedom Collection, a repository of video, oral and written histories documenting freedom movements around the world. The collection will serve as a resource for scholars, activists and policymakers interested in studying the advance of human liberty, Bush said.

“With the Freedom Collection, we will continue our legacy of supporting advocates for freedom around the world,” Bush said.

Oscar Morales Guevara will serve as the institute’s fellow in human freedom. He launched an international Internet movement in 2008 with fellow Colombians against the narco-terrorist network known as FARC.

Within all four areas of focus, the Bush Institute will integrate the involvement of women and social entrepreneurs. In remarks following those of her husband, former First Lady Laura Bush, who will lead the institute’s women’s initiative, said, “Research shows that when you educate and empower women, you improve nearly every aspect of society.”

The Institute will be home to the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council, which will focus on literacy efforts at early- and adult-education levels for women in the United States and Afghanistan. The council plans a March conference on Afghan literacy.

“Education, global health, freedom and economic growth are areas that have been important to President and Mrs. Bush since President Bush first sought office as governor and then president,” said Mark Langdale, president of the George W. Bush Foundation Board of Directors. “The purpose of the institute is to expand on these principles.”

Bush ended by pledging that “together, the Bush Presidential Center and SMU will help this campus continue to grow as a great university. We will be a constructive member of a vibrant Dallas community. And we will contribute to the national dialogue in a positive way for years to come. We are proud to call SMU home.”

Read more from SMU News
Watch the video from the Nov. 12 announcement video
Visit the official George W. Bush Presidential Center website

November 17, 2009|News|

Renowned education scholar joins SMU faculty, Bush Institute

James GuthrieCelebrated scholar James Guthrie will join the faculty at SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development while serving as a Senior Fellow at the George W. Bush Institute, a think tank that is part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center to be built on the SMU campus. This is the first concurrent appointment for SMU and the Bush Institute.

At SMU Nov. 12, former President Bush announced in a speech that Guthrie will become the Bush Institute’s Director of Education Policy Studies and will direct a program of research into ways to improve the quality of school leaders, including principals and administrators.

Currently, Guthrie is Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy and Director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University, whose education school was ranked No. 1 in the country this year by U.S. News & World Report.

“James Guthrie’s contributions to the field of education are legendary,” said David Chard, the Leon Simmons Dean of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. “His timely scholarship targets the obstacles that schools must overcome to provide all children access to high-quality education. His presence on our faculty will immediately shine a spotlight on SMU Simmons School’s efforts to address some of education’s most pressing challenges. Dr. Guthrie’s appointment, confirmed by a vote of our faculty, recognizes his outstanding scholarship on education policy development and the critical role of leadership in effective education.”

“The unique attribute Guthrie brings is his continual insistence on evidence-based policy, something he did long before anybody even invented a term for it,” said Eric Hanushek, Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. Frederick Hess, director of Education Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute and executive editor of Education Next Magazine, called Guthrie one of the nation’s most eminent thinkers on questions of educational leadership, education policy and school reform.

Guthrie is the author or co-author of 20 books and more than 200 academic and professional articles. He serves as a frequent expert witness in court cases and has been a consultant for state, national and international agencies and governments. Guthrie has been selected to serve on panels of the National Academy of Sciences and is the winner of 12 awards and academic fellowships, among them the Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor Award at Vanderbilt University.

Guthrie was a professor for 27 years at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Stanford University, and undertook postdoctoral study in public finance at Harvard. Guthrie was a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford Brookes College, Oxford, England, and the Irving R. Melbo Visiting Professor at the University of Southern California.

His three-year appointments to both the SMU faculty and the Bush Institute begin in January 2010. Agreements signed by SMU and the Bush Foundation in February 2008 outline the stipulations for concurrent appointments – to serve on the SMU faculty, fellows must meet the same criteria that apply to appointees to other faculty positions, and their nomination must be reviewed and approved by the appropriate academic department and school.

Read more from SMU News

November 17, 2009|News|
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