Ignite Arts Dallas

SMU Meadows’ Ignite/Arts and Cara Mía Theatre Co. explore lives of DREAMers in Deferred Action Sept. 14-17, 2017

Rehearsal still photo from Deferred ActionSMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Ignite/Arts Dallas initiative, with co-presenter Cara Mía Theatre Co., will launch a touring version of an acclaimed play on the urgent topic of immigration and the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA) program, originally produced and premiered at Dallas Theater Center in 2016.

Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trull will begin its tour in North Texas with four performances at the Meadows School’s Bob Hope Theatre, Sept. 14-17. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for seniors, and $8 for SMU students, faculty and staff, and are available online at caramiatheatre.org.

Tickets will also be available through the Cara Mía box office in the Hope Theatre lobby one hour before each performance.

The play’s central character is Javier Mejía, one of the immigrants known as DREAMers who arrived in the United States as an undocumented minor. Now, after years in the States, he finds himself caught in the tangle of existing immigration laws, new presidential policies and the harsh reality of living in the shadows. Javier hopes that temporary administrative mechanisms like Deferred Action will be the answer to his dilemma. But will hope be snatched away? Can politicians who say they are the DREAMers’ friends be trusted?

Co-author Lozano is Cara Mía executive artistic director, and Trull serves as Dallas Theater Center’s director of new play development. The touring version is directed by Lozano and features Cara Mía actors and other local and national professional performers.

Subsequent performancers are scheduled at the University of North Texas in Denton, the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas, Talento Bilingüe de Houston and the Encuentro de las Americas International Theatre Festival in Los Angeles. The touring production, the first ever undertaken by Cara Mía, was commissioned by Ignite/Arts Dallas and is sponsored by the Dallas-based Latino Center for Leadership Development.

On Saturday, Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m., a free Community Conversation event will be held in the Bob Hope Theatre to discuss issues raised in the play. The event, sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, will feature a panel and open discussion with members of Cara Mía Theatre about the lives of DREAMers, immigration reform, and current national, state and local policies surrounding undocumented immigrants. Attendees are invited to stay afterward for a complimentary meal provided by Chipotle.

Admission to the Community Conversation is free, and no reservations are required.

> Read the full story at the SMU Meadows School of the Arts website

Tune In: 15 unforgettable photos from The Tempest by SMU Meadows / Ignite Arts Dallas

 

The Tempest, Public Works Dallas

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has chosen the best photos from William Shakespeare’s The Tempest as reimagined by a Meadows Prize winner.

Dallas Theater Center and SMU Meadows / Ignite Arts Dallas, in association with the AT&T Performing Arts Center, presented the musical adaptation as a community participation project conceived by 2015 Meadows Prize winner Lear deBessonet during her residency in the Meadows School. The show was directed by Kevin Moriarty, with book, music and lyrics by Todd Almond.

The production showcased 200 Dallasites from all over the city, who shared the stage with professional actors. The unique staging vividly retold the Bard’s well-loved story of the marooned Prospero, who commands spirits, creates apparitions and manipulates the elements to take revenge on his enemies – and in the process awakens in Miranda, his teenage daughter, her first experience of love.

> See the full slideshow courtesy of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts camera

Meadows School to explore community engagement and the arts with Ignite Arts Dallas

Clyde Valentin, director of arts and urbanism and Ignite Arts Dallas in SMU's Meadows School of the Arts

Clyde Valentín, director of the arts and urbanism initiative in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, will lead Ignite Arts Dallas.

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has launched a new initiative to focus on the intersections of arts and community engagement among Meadows School students, the University campus, the city of Dallas and the arts at large.

Under the leadership of Clyde Valentín, director of the Meadows School’s arts and urbanism initiative, Ignite Arts Dallas will integrate artistic practices with community engagement in Dallas and other communities across the country.

“Over the past several years the Meadows School has increasingly focused on the intersection of the arts and social engagement,” said Sam Holland, Algur H. Meadows Dean of the Meadows School. “Ignite Arts Dallas will bring together under one umbrella our existing programs in these areas, like the annual Meadows Prize, and spark new ideas for programs that will position the Meadows School and Dallas as a national model for art as civic practice.”

The Meadows Prize invites internationally recognized artists and scholars to interact with Meadows students and create a lasting work in Dallas, and students and faculty from throughout the school’s 11 disciplines are involved with projects that support diverse communities in the city. The 2015 winners of the Meadows Prize residency are the Detroit-based artist collective Complex Movements and Lear deBessonet, director of The Public Theater’s Public Works program in New York City.

A second major project of Ignite Arts Dallas, titled P3, will present non-traditional, multidisciplinary performance art work exploring the themes of racial and cultural equity, religion, immigration and the environment. An inaugural gift of $225,000 from the Embrey Family Foundation will enable P3 to showcase four works in Dallas between fall 2015 and fall 2017. The works will feature international, national and local artists working in collaboration with SMU students and community members. P3 also plans to commission a work from a local artist to be developed and produced in Dallas in spring 2017.

“The P3 series is designed to ‘seed’ a pipeline where creators of mid-size performance art projects begin to make Dallas a regular location for the development and presentation of work,” said Valentín, who served as executive director of the New York City-based Hip-Hop Theater Festival before coming to SMU in October 2013. “It is also a vital way to reach into the community and collaborate with organizations such as the AT&T Performing Arts Center, the South Dallas Cultural Center, Dallas Video Fest and others, while offering our students experiences beyond the classroom and the campus.”

The third major program of Ignite Arts Dallas will be the Dallas Arts Project, which will help bring work created in Dallas to completion and will advocate for exporting it to other communities. Through myriad cultural collaborations and interactions, Valentín and Meadows School faculty members and students will work to enhance Dallas’s existing arts and culture ecosystem and encourage people to think of Dallas’s culture in new ways while connecting that cultural energy to other creative communities around the country.

“Our vision for Ignite Arts Dallas is to engage in deep relationships with the broader Dallas community and to introduce students to the arts’ critical role in social engagement,” said Valentín. “Our tagline is ‘people, place, purpose,’ the main ingredients that create meaningful change, with the arts serving as a connector between various sectors that build community. The arts have the ability to shape the narrative of progress for Dallas and other urban centers across the country. Through our work with exemplary artists, cultural organizers and artistic scholars, we will contribute to a vision of our cities where the arts are integrated into our communities and where the modern urban fabric is built on a foundation of equity and sustainability.”

Written by Victoria Winkelman

> Read the full story at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts website