Oscar winner to be honored at SMU human rights symposium

Human Rights Education Program

Oscar winner to be honored at SMU human rights symposium

Rob EpsteinFilmmaker Rob Epstein (right), director and writer of the 2010 Sundance Film Festival hit “Howl” and the Oscar-winning documentary “The Times of Harvey Milk,” will be honored during the 2010 SMU Media and Human Rights Symposium. “Tribute! A Conversation With Rob Epstein” begins at 7 p.m. April 6 in the Angelika Film Center at Mockingbird Station.

The event kicks off the two-day symposium, cosponsored by SMU and the Division of Cinema-Television in Meadows School of the Arts. Symposium panels are scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 7 in the Meadows Museum and will focus on how the media impacts human rights in America. Themed sessions will explore justice in journalism; new media and human rights; media and the death penalty; and media, race, ethics and justice.

Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program, will serve as keynote speaker during a luncheon April 7. Halperin is a former chair of the Board of Directors of Amnesty International USA.

Regional and national leaders participating in the symposium include:

SMU participants and moderators include Meadows Dean José Antonio Bowen; Craig Flournoy, Division of Journalism, Sean Griffin, Derek Kompare and Rachel Lyon, Division of Cinema-TV; Mark McPhail, Division of Corporate Communications and Public Affairs; and Tom Mayo, Dedman School of Law.

The symposium is free and open to the public. Reservations are required for all events and can be made through the SMU Cinema-Television Division, 214-768-2129.

April 6, 2010|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 10, 2009

Plantation store, 1939Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Clements Center Fellow Sarah Cornell examines the clashes between workers and planters in early 20th-century Mississippi and Louisiana in “Planters and Peons: Mexican Workers in the U.S. South” at noon Nov. 11 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch. For more information, contact the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, 214-768-3684. (Right, African American and Mexican cotton pickers in a plantation store, Mississippi Delta, 1939.)

“Holocaust Legacies” symposium: A panel of Holocaust historians, educators and survivors – as well as gerontologists, social workers and pastoral care clergy – will discuss findings from a study on resilience, forgiveness and survivorship among older Holocaust survivors in “Holocaust Survivors: Stories of Resilience.” Presenters include Roberta R. Greene, School of Social Work, University of Texas; and Harriet L. Cohen, Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work, TCU. The symposium takes place 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Nov. 12 in the Great Hall, Perkins Prothro Hall, and is part of the “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” series presented by SMU’s Human Rights Education Program.

A song in their hearts: The Dallas Opera/SMU Emerging Artist Program presents Opera in a Box: Follow Your Dreams, written and directed by Meadows Opera Theatre Director Hank Hammett. Using props and costumes, four aspiring opera singers share their personal passions, experiences and joys while creating some of their favorite characters onstage. The performance is sung in English and begins at 1 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. Cosponsored by The Dallas Morning News. Free and open to the public.

Meadows Wind EnsembleSix by Tenn: The Meadows Wind Ensemble (right) leads an evening of music and poetry featuring mezzo-soprano and SMU Professor Virginia Dupuy in a performance of Warren Benson’s Shadow Wood: Six Poems of Tennessee Williams, composed on commission for the Meadows Wind Ensemble and featured on the Ensemble’s first commercial CD in the late 1990s. The program also features Joseph Schwantner’s Music of Amber with Meadows pianist and professor Samuel Holland as guest soloist, Augusta Read Thomas’s Magneticfireflies and a set of works by Toru Takemitsu. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 each for students, faculty and staff members. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 ((214-SMU-ARTS).

“Meadows at the Bath House” Series: The Meadows School of the Arts faculty jazz quintet Jampact will perform with videographers and movement artists using live cameras and improvisation to create a unique performance experience. The show begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Bath House Cultural Center on White Rock Lake, 521 E. Lawther Drive. Tickets are $5 each. For more information, contact Kim Corbet at 214-542-5663 or visit the Bath House Cultural Center website.

November 10, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 3, 2009

Akira SatoAll that jazz: SMU’s Meadows Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Akira Sato (right) presents an evening of small-group jazz featuring classic works such as Stella by Starlight by Victor Young, Take Five by Dave Brubeck, Windows by Chick Corea and Groovin’ High by Dizzy Gillespie. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music at 214-768-1951.

Maguire Public Scholar Lecture: Law Professor Jenia Turner will examine the limits of advocacy in representing clients accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide in “Ethical Dilemmas of International Criminal Defense Attorneys,” part of the “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” series. The lecture takes place noon-1 p.m. Nov. 5 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West and Central Ballrooms; heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served at 11:30 a.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program. Free and open to the public; no RSVP necessary.

Gilbert Lecture Series: Poet Jeff Dolven, professor of Renaissance literature at Princeton University and author of Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance, speaks on “Styles of Disjunction” Nov. 5 in DeGolyer Library. Reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room; lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. Free and open to the public. Presented by the Department of English, Dedman College.

Meadows Chamber Music Showcase: Performers will present chamber works ranging from the early Classical period to the 20th century at 8 p.m. Nov. 6 and 2 p.m. Nov. 8 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

November 3, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2009

Illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250, from SMU's Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible CollectionGood books: Nearly 60 remarkable bibles – including Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and early American editions – are on view in “The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection” in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library, through Dec. 11, 2009. For more information call 214-768-3483 or visit the Bridwell Library website. (Right, a page from an illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250.)

Patriotic pride: SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2009 at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution and the traveling Liberty Bell will be present, and cake and punch will be served. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 214-768-4498.

Remembering a pioneer: Author and editor Charlotte Whaley will give a lecture on her latest work – a collection of memoirs by Alice Marriott, one of the first women in the Southwest to hold an advanced degree in anthropology and who studied Southwestern American Indian culture. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by a book signing for Alice Marriott Remembered. All events take place in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and DeGolyer Library. For more information, call 214-768-3225.

“Holocaust Legacies” lecture: Georgetown University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Beauchamp, senior research scholar with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and primary author of the Belmont Report, will participate in a lecture and panel discussion, “From the Nuremburg Code to the Belmont Report and the Final Rule: The Protection of Human Research Subjects in the 21st Century,” Sept. 17 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program as part of “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point.” Free and open to the public.

'Galileo Goes to Jail' book coverStanton Sharp Lecture: Author, editor and historian Ronald L. Numbers (Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion), Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss “Anti-Evolution in America: From Creation Science to Intelligent Design” Sept. 18 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 3:30 p.m., lecture at 4 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History, Dedman College. For more information, contact the history department, 214-768-2967, or visit its Sharp Lectures web page.

Fun and games: Prospective students can explore The Guildhall at SMU during its Fall 2009 open house, 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 19 at the SMU-in-Plano campus, 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2. Activities include food and games for all ages and a bounce house for kids, plus LEGO Star Wars for gaming enthusiasts. RSVP online at the Guildhall website.

Tate-Willson Lecture: Nigel Biggar – Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology and director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at the University of Oxford – will discuss “Behaving in Public: Christian Ethics in a Polyglot Secularity” at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 in 106 Prothro Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Graduate Program in Religious Studies Office, 214-768-2432. Presented by the Graduate Program in Religious Studies and cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

September 15, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

New lecture series explores Holocaust’s lingering impact

'Holocaust Legacies' posterSMU’s Human Rights Education Program is cosponsoring a three-month series of lectures, symposiums, film screenings, photography exhibits and musical performances examining how the Holocaust continues to affect the world.

“Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” begins Sept. 9 with a 7 p.m. reception and a 7:30 p.m. introductory panel discussion in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The program will run through the end of November with events held both on and off the SMU campus, and all events are free and open to the public.

Panel members on Sept. 9 will include Christopher Anderson, associate professor of sacred music in Perkins School of Theology; Janis Bergman-Carton, art history chair in Meadows School of the Arts; Elliott Dlin, executive director of the Dallas Holocaust Museum; Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program and Tom Mayo, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Halperin, who each December escorts educational groups to former Nazi death camp locations in Poland, is committed to raising awareness of what he calls “the crime within the war,” even as the number of people who lived through the war, and the Holocaust, dwindles with each passing year. September marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II.

“It’s safe to say most Americans don’t think about World War II any more,” Halperin said. “We fought the war, defeated the Nazis, and came home the good guys. We mushroomed into a world power. Most Americans since then have lived a relatively safe and comfortable life.”

But the legacy of the Holocaust continues at many levels, Halperin said: The Nazis committed the greatest art theft in history, looting the collections of Jewish families whose descendents are still litigating to see their treasures returned. All major war crime tribunals bear the stamp of the post-World War II Nuremburg Trials, and the United States in May deported a nearly 90-year-old man, John Demjanjuk, for Nazi war crimes.

Halperin noted that in Europe, sensitivity to the Shoah’s legacy is reflected even in restrictions to how people talk and write about the Nazi regime. “You can buy a copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf in the SMU Book Store – that’s free speech,” Halperin explained. “You can deny the Holocaust in the U.S., and that’s free speech, too. You can’t do that in Europe.” Halperin said he expects the series to be “a powerful, emotional, somber and sobering series of events.”

Co-sponsors for the 2009 Fall Program Series are SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Perkins School of Theology, TCU’s Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work and the University of Dallas.

Find a complete schedule at the SMU News site

September 8, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
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