Harold Stanley

Harold Stanley named SMU vice president for executive affairs

Harold StanleyAcademic leader and political science scholar Harold W. Stanley has been named SMU’s vice president for executive affairs, effective Feb. 1, 2016. Stanley has been serving as vice president for academic affairs and provost ad interim since June.

Dr. Stanley previously served as an SMU associate provost. In his new role he will work with President R. Gerald Turner on strategic planning, campus master planning and a variety of other University matters. He replaces Thomas E. Barry, who has served in the position since 1995. Barry has announced his retirement from that position, effective Dec. 31, 2015.

> SMU Forum: Tom Barry announce his retirement as SMU VP for executive affairs

“Harold Stanley’s service in the Office of the Provost has provided him with deep knowledge of the University and its operations,” Turner said. “He has served on committees focusing on the curriculum, honors program and the Second Century Campaign. As a distinguished member of the Political Science faculty, he brings a strong understanding of the University’s mission of teaching, research and service. I am delighted that an accomplished academic administrator from within the SMU community is ready to step into this important role.”

As an associate provost, Stanley oversaw SMU’s international study, research and internship programs in its International Center; teaching, research and other activities at the University’s New Mexico campus, SMU-in-Taos; student academic services in the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center and the Loyd Center for the Academic Development of Student Athletes; and the University’s most prestigious scholarship for exceptional students, the President’s Scholars program.

Stanley came to SMU in 2003 as the Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

> SMU Forum: Harold Stanley named 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar

At SMU, Stanley has been a member of the Executive Board of the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies since 2003. He has also chaired the Honors Task Force (2006-07), served on the General Education Review Committee (2007-09), and co-chaired the Faculty/Staff Steering Committee for the Second Century Campaign (2009-10). He received SMU’s Distinguished University Citizen Award in 2008 and the University’s highest recognition, the “M” Award, in 2010. He was honored with the Outstanding Administrator Award in 2013.

Stanley has written three books: Vital Statistics on American Politics, now in its 15th edition (CQ Press); Voter Mobilization and the Politics of Race: The South and Universal Suffrage, 1952-1984 (Praeger, 1987), and Senate vs. Governor, Alabama 1971: Referents for Opposition in a One-Party Legislature (University of Alabama Press, 1975). He has also published numerous reviews, book chapters and journal articles in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, among others.

A former president of the Southern Political Science Association, Stanley received the 2010 Outstanding Teaching in Political Science Award from Pi Sigma Alpha and the American Political Science Association. Earlier this year, he was named a 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar.

Stanley received his B.A. degree from Yale in 1972, graduating magna cum laude as well as with honors with exceptional distinction in political science. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University (Worcester College) from 1972-75, earning a Master of Philosophy in politics. He returned to Yale to earn his Ph.D. in political science in 1981.

Helping students with stress during the holiday and exam season

SMU students in Fondren Science BuildingAs SMU enters both the holiday and exam seasons, Interim Provost Harold Stanley is asking that all University community members watch for signs of stress in themselves and in students.

Dr. Stanley asked that each faculty and staff member “be aware of signs of stress in yourself and those around you” in an e-mail message dated Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015.

“In particular, I ask that you be aware of signs of stress among students, especially first-year students as they are experiencing their first set of final exams,” he added.

He also reminded the University community that “[s]tudents who feel overwhelmed by the stress of the season and finals can visit the offices at the Memorial Health Center, currently located at Perkins Hall, just to the north of Perkins Chapel.”

In addition, Dr. Stanley urged faculty and staff members to visit SMU’s Caring Community Connections homepage for information on identifying and helping students who may be in crisis. The confidential system “will allow us to identify students about whom we are concerned so that we are able to provide them with appropriate information, support, and advice,” he wrote.

He encouraged all to become familiar with SMU’s Guide for Faculty and Staff for Recognizing and Responding to Students in Distress, available online.

Dr. Stanley also issued the University’s traditional call for faculty and staff members to “reach out to an individual who is separated from family and friends at this time and invite them to share some of your traditions and goodwill.”

Many SMU resources are available to help University community members stay healthy and safe during the holiday and exam season, including these:

Perkins dean search committee named; open faculty-staff forums scheduled for Sept. 14, 2015

SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs ad interim Harold W. Stanley has named the members of the search committee for the next dean of Perkins School of Theology.

Dean William B. Lawrence has announced that he will retire from the position on May 16, 2016 and take a leave of absence during the 2016-17 academic year, possibly returning to SMU as professor of American church history after that time.

Samuel S. Holland, dean of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, chairs the Perkins Dean Search Committee. The committee members include:

  • Rev. Richie Butler ’93, senior pastor, St. Paul United Methodist Church, Dallas
  • Dodee Frost Crockett ’75, ’03, managing director, Crockett, McBride & Associates, member of the Perkins Executive Board
  • Bishop Michael McKee, SMU trustee, Resident Bishop of the North Texas Annual Conference
  • Rev. Paul Rasmussen ’04, senior pastor, Highland Park United Methodist Church
  • Kay Prothro Yeager, community volunteer and civic leader, member of the Perkins Executive Board
  • Chris Anderson, Sacred Music, Perkins School of Theology
  • William Jennings Bryan III, associate dean for student affairs, Perkins School of Theology
  • Carlos Cardoza-Orlandi, World Christianities and Mission Studies, Perkins School of Theology
  • Kate Carté Engel, History, Dedman College
  • Steven Lindquist, Religious Studies, Dedman College
  • Natalia Mirandiuc, Christian Theology, Perkins School of Theology
  • Peter Moore, professor of mathematics, senior associate dean and associate dean for general education, Dedman College
  • Evelyn Parker, Susanna Wesley Chair of Practical Theology, associate dean for academic affairs, Perkins School of Theology
  • Rev. Dr. Stephen Rankin, SMU chaplain
  • Abraham Smith, New Testament, Perkins School of Theology
  • Pavielle Chriss, Master’s degree candidate, Perkins School of Theology
  • Geoffrey Moore, doctoral candidate, Religious Students, Dedman College

Dr. Ann Die Hasselmo, senior consultant of Academic Search, Inc., will serve as consultant to the Search Committee. She has worked with SMU on several previous academic searches, including the most recent dean searches for Dedman College and Meadows School of the Arts as well as the current searches for the provost and the vice president for student affairs.

Dean Holland has invited all Perkins faculty and staff members to meet with members of the Search Committee and Dr. Hasselmo. Two open forums have been scheduled for Monday, Sept. 14, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in 121 Prothro Hall in the Theology Quad.

Wes Waggoner named interim SMU AVP for enrollment management effective July 1, 2015

Wes K. Waggoner

SMU Dean of Undergraduate Admission Wes Waggoner has been named the University’s interim associate vice president for enrollment management.

SMU Dean of Undergraduate Admission Wes Waggoner has been named the University’s interim associate vice president for enrollment management in the Office of the Provost, effective July 1, 2015.

“Wes has provided leadership in the SMU Admission Office during a time of an unprecedented increase in the number and quality of applicants to the University,” says Harold W. Stanley, interim provost and vice president for academic affairs. “He has brought expertise and passion to his role as an executive director of the Division of Enrollment Services by overseeing improvements to recruitment strategies and increased efficiency in admission operations. He will maintain the division’s focus on serving prospective and current students, while supporting SMU’s ongoing commitment to increasing quality and diversity.”

As interim associate vice president, Waggoner will oversee the Division of Enrollment Services, which includes the Office of Undergraduate Admission, Office of Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar and Bursar’s Office.  He also will provide guidance for summer school enrollment.

Waggoner was named dean of undergraduate admission and executive director of enrollment services at SMU in 2011. He previously held admission roles at TCU, the University of Tulsa, Tulane University, Fort Worth Country Day School and The Episcopal School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Tulane University and an MBA with a concentration in not-for-profit management from the University of Dallas.

Waggoner is a nationally known leader in the admission profession, having served as chair of the Professional Development Committee for the National Association for College Admission Counseling, chair of the Admissions Practices Committee for the Texas Association for College Admission Counseling (TACAC), chair of the Higher Education Curriculum Committee for the Admission and College Counseling Institute, and as a member of The College Board’s SAT Advisory Committee and the SAT Score Choice Task Force.

SMU will conduct a national search to replace Associate Provost Stephanie Dupaul, who has been appointed vice president for enrollment management at the University of Richmond.

Harold Stanley named 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar

Harold Stanley, SMU Engaged Learning Expo 2013, photo by Kim Leeson

SMU Associate Provost Harold Stanley speaking at the University’s 2013 Engaged Learning Expo. Stanley, the Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy in Dedman College, will be a 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar. Photo credit: SMU/Kim Leeson.

Harold Stanley, Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy and SMU associate provost, has been named a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar for the 2015-16 academic year.

Stanley, who was named SMU’s interim provost and vice president for academic affairs in late March, joins 12 other outstanding scholars in the liberal arts and sciences from institutions including Columbia, Princeton, Stanford, Yale, NYU, UCLA, Penn State, Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Boston University and the Institute for Signifying Scriptures.

Past Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars have included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Pulitzer Prize-winning writers and journalists, and Nobel Prize winners. Stanley is the third SMU faculty member to be selected for the program: Annemarie Weyl Carr, University Distinguished Professor Emerita of Art History, participated in 1986-87; and William F. May, Professor Emeritus and Maguire Chair in Ethics, served in 1999-2000.

“It’s an honor to be in such distinguished company and a delight to take part in this exchange of ideas with other colleges and universities,” Stanley said. “I look forward to meeting my hosts and participating in their intellectual lives.”

During the 2015-16 academic year, Stanley will travel to eight institutions that house Phi Beta Kappa chapters, spending two days on each campus. He will meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the academic community and the general public.

Stanley’s research focuses on American government, particularly on Southern and Latino politics as well as presidential elections. He has written three books: Vital Statistics on American Politics, now in its 15th edition (CQ Press); Voter Mobilization and the Politics of Race: The South and Universal Suffrage, 1952-1984 (Praeger, 1987), and Senate vs. Governor, Alabama 1971: Referents for Opposition in a One-Party Legislature (University of Alabama Press, 1975).

He has also published numerous reviews, book chapters and journal articles in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and The Journal of Politics, among others.

A former president of the Southern Political Science Association, Stanley received the 2010 Outstanding Teaching in Political Science Award from Pi Sigma Alpha and the American Political Science Association.

Founded Dec. 5, 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest academic honor society. Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program has made it possible for undergraduates to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The program was created to contribute to intellectual life on campus through an exchange of ideas between Visiting Scholars and resident faculty and students.

> Visit the official Phi Beta Kappa website at pbk.org

Associate Provost Harold Stanley named interim SMU provost

Harold StanleySMU Associate Provost Harold W. Stanley has been named the University’s vice president for academic affairs and provost ad interim effective June 1, 2015. Current Provost Paul W. Ludden has announced that he will be leaving the Office of the Provost on May 31, 2015.

A distinguished political scientist with special expertise in American government, Southern and Latino politics and presidential elections, Dr. Stanley came to SMU in 2003 as the Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

He became the University’s associate provost in June 2010. In this position, he oversees SMU’s international study, research and internship programs in its International Center; teaching, research and other activities at the University’s New Mexico campus, SMU-in-Taos; student academic services in the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center and the Loyd Center for the Academic Development of Student Athletes; and the University’s most prestigious scholarship for exceptional students, the President’s Scholars program.

“We are fortunate to have Dr. Stanley in place to serve in this important role,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner, who appointed the interim provost. “He is an outstanding scholar and University citizen who understands the issues and operations of the Office of the Provost and the academic life it guides. He will provide valuable continuity as we conduct a national search for provost and vice president for academic affairs.”

At SMU, Dr. Stanley has been a member of the Executive Board of the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies since 2003. He has also chaired the Honors Task Force (2006-07), served on the General Education Review Committee (2007-09), and co-chaired the Faculty/Staff Steering Committee for the Second Century Campaign (2009-10). He received SMU’s Distinguished University Citizen Award in 2008 and the University’s highest recognition, the “M” Award, in 2010. He was honored with the Outstanding Administrator Award in 2013.

Dr. Stanley has written three books: Vital Statistics on American Politics, now in its 15th edition (CQ Press); Voter Mobilization and the Politics of Race: The South and Universal Suffrage, 1952-1984 (Praeger, 1987), and Senate vs. Governor, Alabama 1971: Referents for Opposition in a One-Party Legislature (University of Alabama Press, 1975). He has also published numerous reviews, book chapters and journal articles in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and The Journal of Politics, among others.

A former president of the Southern Political Science Association, Dr. Stanley received the 2010 Outstanding Teaching in Political Science Award from Pi Sigma Alpha and the American Political Science Association. Earlier this year, he was named a 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar.

Dr. Stanley received his B.A. degree from Yale in 1972, graduating magna cum laude as well as with honors with exceptional distinction in political science. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University (Worcester College) from 1972-75, earning a Master of Philosophy in politics. He returned to Yale to earn his Ph.D. in political science in 1981.

Alumna’s debut novel is SMU’s 2014 Common Reading

'We Need New Names' by NoViolet BulawayoFor the incoming class of 2018, SMU has chosen an acclaimed first novel that is also the first Common Reading selection to be written by an SMU graduate.

We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo tells the story of 10-year-old Darling, a Zimbabwean girl who lives in a shantytown called Paradise. Darling’s father has contracted AIDS – euphemistically called “the sickness” by the book’s characters – while working in South Africa. Her mother has left town in her own attempt to provide for the family.

Unexpectedly, Darling gets the chance to live in the United States with an aunt. But the golden opportunity doesn’t pan out according to her dreams when she begins her new life as an undocumented immigrant in Detroit.

“Bulawayo describes all this in brilliant language, alive and confident, often funny, strong in its ability to make Darling’s African life immediate,” wrote Uzodinma Iweala in The New York Times Book Review.

> SMU Magazine: Alumna traces career awakening to SMU

Judy Wertheimer’s review in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette states that “Ms. Bulawayo’s artistry is such that we can’t help but see ourselves in that wider world…. Darling is a dazzling life force with a rich, inventive language all her own, funny and perceptive but still very much a child.”

“We believe that this narrative will provide students with a wholly original reading experience,” said Associate Provost Harold Stanley in an e-mail to faculty and staff members dated Monday, May 19, 2014.

Bulawayo, known to many at SMU by her given name of Elizabeth Tshele, earned her master’s degree in English from the University in 2007 after receiving her bachelor’s in English from Texas A&M University-Commerce. In 2010, she received her M.F.A. in creative writing from Cornell as a Truman Capote Fellow. She recently completed a 2012-14 Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford.

Her pen name is a tribute both to her mother, who died when she was 18 months old (NoViolet means “with Violet” in her native Ndebele), and to her childhood home, the second-largest city in Zimbabwe.

Bulawayo’s semi-autobiographical first novel has received several prestigious awards and recognitions, including the 2014 PEN/Hemingway Prize for Debut Fiction, the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for First Fiction, and the 2013 Etisalat Prize for Literature. Additionally, she became the first black African woman to make the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize (in 2013) and made The New York Times’ 2013 Notable Books of the Year list, as well as National Public Radio’s “Great Reads of 2013.”

We Need New Names is only the second work of fiction chosen for the University’s Common Reading since the program began in 2004. The first, How to Be Good by Nick Hornby, was SMU’s Common Reading selection in 2007.

Past SMU Common Reading books also include Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business by Neil Postman (2004), Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich (2005), The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman (2006), The Devil’s Highway by Luís Alberto Urrea (2008), Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama (2009), Zeitoun by Dave Eggers (2010), The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (2011), The Big Short by Michael Lewis (2012), and The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore (2013).

The Common Reading Selection Committee is now seeking leaders for the pre-Convocation reading discussion. Discussion leaders will receive a free copy of the book. Active and emeritus professors from all SMU schools are invited to take part, as well as University staff members.

To volunteer as a discussion leader, or for more information on this year’s selection, contact Diana Grumbles, 214-768-3832.

> Learn more from SMU’s Common Reading homepage: smu.edu/commonreading

University appoints new SMU Abroad director

Catherine WinnieAs the new director of SMU Abroad, Catherine Hutchison Winnie brings to the University expertise in developing diverse global experiences for students, including programs for research, internships and service abroad.

Winnie, who began her appointment at the start of the fall term, comes to SMU from Harvard University, where she most recently served as director of the Office of International Education at Harvard College. Winnie holds a doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Swarthmore College.

“Students and faculty at SMU interested in study abroad will find Cathy Winnie’s know-how and enthusiasm contagious and empowering,” says Associate Provost Harold Stanley, who oversees the Office of Education Abroad. “Such interest is increasingly central to SMU’s mission. SMU’s Centennial Strategic Plan includes the goal of increasing participation in study abroad, and in the University Curriculum faculty adopted a global engagement requirement for all undergraduates. Dr. Winnie brings an impressive record of enhancing study abroad and is the right person at the right time to help SMU fulfill its goals.”

Winnie is responsible for overseeing SMU Abroad’s 148 summer, semester and yearlong study abroad programs in 50 countries. More than 500 students participate every year in SMU Abroad programs in Africa, Asia, Europe, Central America, South America and Australia.

“This is an exciting time to be at SMU and to be part of its mission to shape world changers,” Winnie says. “SMU has a strong commitment to a global education both here in Dallas and abroad that helps students succeed in our increasingly interdependent world. The direct global experiences offered by SMU Abroad are not only enriching students’ education, but also building bridges between communities.”

Winnie says she is looking forward to partnering with students, faculty and staff to explore their international goals and help them open doors abroad. “Some students may benefit from a semester or year of coursework at a foreign university, while others may choose an international internship, service work or independent research,” she says. “In all cases, they are gaining new perspectives on problem-solving, leadership and culture, as well as important life skills such as adaptability. When students bring this knowledge back home to SMU and Dallas, our entire community benefits.”

Winnie’s prior appointments include director of Academic Enhancement Programs at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, where she was founding director of the RIT Honors Program as well as the Study Abroad and Fellowships offices.

At Yale University, Winnie was assistant dean and founding director of the Office of International Education and Fellowships of Yale College. In addition, she served as associate dean of international study at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, where she also created an office for graduate international fellowships.

Winnie has traveled extensively and speaks several languages, including German, French and Spanish. She is the recipient of a DAAD Fellowship, a Berlin Airlift Scholarship, and an alumna of the Management Development Program of the Harvard School of Education. She has lectured at the University of Mainz in Germany and at Instituto Meyer in Bogotá, Colombia. She and her husband, Larry Winnie, are the parents of two school-age daughters, Lidya and Samerawit, whom they adopted from Ethiopia in 2005, and a son, Matt, an aspiring screenwriter.

Written by Sarah Hanan

Three receive 2013 Distinguished University Citizen Awards

Three faculty members were honored with SMU’s 2013 Distinguished University Citizen Award at the Faculty Breakfast held Saturday, May 18 before Commencement. This year’s recipients are:

  • Robert Kehoe, Physics, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Dennis Simon, Political Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Paige Ware, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

The award winners became part of “a strong list of distinguished faculty who have served SMU extraordinarily well and whose examples continue to energize SMU and encourage each of us,” said Associate Provost Harold Stanley in presenting the honors.

The award, given by the Provost’s Office, honors three faculty members each year for service and activities that benefit students and the University’s academic mission.

One name, two fates: SMU’s 2013 Common Reading

Two boys with the same name were born within blocks of each other and less than a year apart. Both grew up fatherless in the same poverty-stricken Baltimore ghetto. Both experienced the same hazards of urban youth: racism, violence and trouble with the law. How did one become a Rhodes Scholar and investment banker and the other a convicted murderer serving a life sentence for killing an off-duty police officer?

SMU’s entering class of 2017 will examine the experiences of these two men whose lives turned out very differently, despite their similar backgrounds, in the 2013 Common Reading selection, The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates.

> Watch author Wes Moore discuss the book in his own words in a new YouTube window video

'The Other Wes Moore' book coverThe New York Times bestseller explores the contrast between the book’s author – who graduated from Johns Hopkins University and worked alongside Condoleezza Rice in the White House – and “the other” Wes Moore, whose path led to drug dealing, armed robbery and prison.

The difference between their destinies is troubling, and Moore the author aims to arrive at some conclusions about the factors and influences that led his counterpart down paths so divergent from his own.

The book “both disturbs and inspires readers with questions about the influence of family and education in the choices a young person makes,” wrote Associate Provost Harold Stanley in an e-mail to faculty and staff members dated Thursday, May 2, 2013.

The Common Reading Selection Committee is now seeking leaders for the pre-Convocation reading discussion that has become a first-week-on-campus tradition. Discussion leaders will receive a free copy of the book. Active and emeritus professors from all SMU schools are invited to take part.

To volunteer as a discussion leader, or for more information on this year’s selection, contact Diana Grumbles, 214-768-3832.

> Learn more about SMU’s 2013 Common Reading at theotherwesmoore.com

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