Lyle School to offer Master’s in Sustainability & Development

green initiatives

Lyle School to offer Master’s in Sustainability & Development

The Pallet House prototype by I-Beam Design
The Pallet House prototype created by I-Beam Design was featured in HRH Prince Charles’ Royal Gardens as part of an exhibition on sustainable design. The inspiration for the Pallet House Project came from the fact that 84% of the world’s refugees could be housed with a year’s supply of recycled American pallets. (Photo courtesy of I-Beam Design)

It’s going to take more than engineering to build a world of sustainable cities. That’s the challenge behind a new Master’s degree from SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering that is already drawing multi-industry leaders to the intersection of engineering design, urban planning and environmental policy.

The Master of Arts in Sustainability and Development will be offered beginning in January 2012 through the Lyle School, with support from the Hunter & Stephanie Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity.

The Lyle School and the Hunt Institute will kick off the new degree program Friday, Dec. 9, with a special mid-day program featuring renowned London urban sustainability strategist Peter Bishop and the unveiling of an innovative, low-cost “pallet house” previously featured at a sustainability expo hosted by the Prince of Wales.

“The world’s population just hit 7 billion,” said Lyle School Dean Geoffrey Orsak. “The need to build livable, sustainable cities has moved beyond the critical stage. This new degree program creates a framework for partnerships between engineers and the architects, city planners and environmental policy experts needed to ensure the cities can thrive in the face of so many challenges.”

“With this population growth comes a tremendous strain on non-renewable resources, infrastructure, and energy sources,” said Betsy del Monte, SMU Lyle adjunct professor, and principal and director of sustainability at the Beck Group. “Providing access to clean water, clean air, housing, and transportation will shape public policy, redefine business, and engage a generation.”

Students pursuing the Master of Arts in Sustainability and Development will complete a 30-hour interdisciplinary program that will cover sustainability-related topics from policy to design in both developed and developing worlds.  The program will advance the wise use of environmental resources in urban development, with a goal of creating and re-building economically and environmentally healthy cities, both here and abroad.

The program offered through the Lyle School’s Civil and Environmental Engineering Department will incorporate studies in:

  • Re-use and redevelopment
  • Urban transportation systems
  • Modernization of existing structures
  • Waste and sanitation

Classes begin in January 2012. Applications are now being accepted at smu.edu/lyle.

– Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Get the full story from SMU News
> Visit the Lyle School of Engineering homepage
> Learn more about the Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity

December 8, 2011|News|

Tune In: Make mine trayless

Each tray used in the SMU cafeterias requires a half gallon of water to clean – and with 15,000 meals served each week, the cost in resources adds up quickly.

SMU students have started to eliminate the use of trays in the cafeteria to lessen their carbon footprint. Click the screen below to watch a student-produced news clip from The Daily Mustang:

April 7, 2010|Tune In|

Tune In: Green Minute winner highlights the sense in recycling

SMU Green Minute winner Aleksandra GaworAleksandra Gawor (right), a sophomore majoring in business and anthropology and a member of the Student Technology Assistant in Residence (STARs) team, is the winner of SMU’s Green Minute Video contest. The student contest was sponsored by the SMU Sustainability Committee to increase green awareness on campus.

In her 35-second spot, Gawor uses dry humor and driving music to deliver a common-sense message about recycling. Watch the winning video by clicking the YouTube screen below:

October 22, 2009|Tune In|

It’s easy being green: 2009 Campus Sustainability Day is Oct. 21

Sustainable SMUSMU students, faculty and staff will gather at the Flagpole at mid-day Oct. 21 for games, giveaways and green tips as the Hilltop celebrate the 7th annual national Campus Sustainability Day.

Members of the University’s Campus Sustainability Committee will moderate a game of Environmental Jeopardy, encourage students to sign a green pledge, and introduce the residence halls’ new team of E-representatives from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Winners of the SMU Green Minute video competition will be announced at noon.

“SMU has a long list of sustainable practices on an institutional level that people just don’t know about,” says Campus Sustainability Chair Michael Paul. “We’d love for people to check out our website at smu.edu/sustainability to find out what we’re doing. And it’s also a good place to find tips for easy things that our community can do to keep SMU green.”

Campus Sustainability Day was founded in 2002 as part of the Society for College and University Planning‘s early efforts to support campus planning for sustainability. Several organizations now join with SCUP to support the event, including the Higher Education Associations’ Sustainability Consortium.

Read about the history of Campus Sustainability Day and see a list of organizations that have participated since 2003 at the Campus Sustainability Day website.

Visit the Sustainability @ SMU website

October 20, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|

Dallas Hall to go dark for Earth Hour 2009

Dallas Hall at night

For one hour on March 28, the lights will go down in SMU’s historic Dallas Hall as part of Earth Hour 2009. Hundreds of cities are expected to participate in the observance at 8:30 p.m. local time.

SMU community members will gather on the Main Quad from 8:30-9:30 p.m. to reflect on power usage and climate change. Individuals are also being encouraged to turn off their own lights during that time.

The building joins several other Dallas icons in the voluntary blackout Saturday night. The lights of Reunion Tower, the red neon Pegasus atop the Magnolia Hotel and the green argon outlines of the Bank of America Tower all will go dark. Street lights, traffic lights and other safety lighting will not be affected.

Earth Hour began in Sydney, Australia in 2007, when 2.2 million homes and businesses switched off their lights for one hour. By 2008 the message had gone global, with 50 million people participating worldwide, as well as such international landmarks as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, Rome’s Colosseum, the Sydney Opera House and the Coca-Cola billboard in Times Square.

Earth Hour organizers have set a goal of 1 billion individual participants for 2009.

Read more from The Dallas Morning News
Visit the official Earth Hour website

March 27, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
Load More Posts