Engineering professor Joe Camp wins 2012 NSF career award


Engineering professor Joe Camp wins 2012 NSF career award

Joseph CampJoseph Camp of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering has earned a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, given to junior faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding researchexcellent education and the integration of education and research in American colleges and universities.

Camp, assistant professor and J. Lindsay Embrey Trustee Professor of Electrical Engineering, will receive $450,000 over the next 5 years to fund research toward improved wireless network design incorporating low frequencies previously occupied by analog TV signals.

“The FCC has recently reassigned the frequency bands that were previously used by analog TV – that’s why viewers were forced to switch to an analog-to-digital converter,” Camp said. “It opened up a large portion of bandwidth for data communications, creating opportunities for innovative wireless network design.”

Transmission range improves at lower frequencies, as does as the ability of the signal to cut through obstacles, which makes these newly available frequency bands highly desirable for internet transmission. Being able to establish wireless networks with fewer transmission towers could result in lowering the cost of service delivery in some cases.

“Alongside these policy changes, wireless hardware is becoming increasingly complex and capable of supporting more bands,” Camp said. “As a result, the simple question becomes, ‘How do we use the simultaneous access to many different types of frequency bands to improve wireless network performance?’”

The NSF is the funding source for approximately 20 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America’s colleges and universities. In the past few decades, NSF-funded researchers have won more than 180 Nobel Prizes.

“Joe’s highly competitive NSF award recognizes the extraordinary value of his work and his commitment to share his discoveries and knowledge with students,” said Lyle Dean Geoffrey Orsak. “We are fortunate to have him at the Lyle School and very proud that Joe represents the sixth NSF CAREER awardee on our faculty. Given the small size of our faculty, this is a remarkably strong showing.”

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February 24, 2012|For the Record, News|

Research Spotlight: Four professors named 2011 Ford Research Fellows

SMU's 2011 Ford Research FellowsFour outstanding SMU researchers have been named as the University’s 2011 Ford Research Fellows. This year’s recipients are Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College; Thomas Hagstrom, Mathematics, Dedman College; Neil Tabor, Earth Sciences, Dedman College; and Sze-kar Wan, New Testament, Perkins School of Theology.

Established in 2002 through a $1 million pledge from SMU Trustee Gerald J. Ford, the fellowships help the University retain and reward outstanding scholars. Each recipient receives a cash prize for research support during the year.

Above, the new Ford Research Fellows were honored by the SMU Board of Trustees during its May meeting (left to right): Sze-kar Wan, Thomas Hagstrom, Johan Elverskog and Neil Tabor.


May 27, 2011|For the Record, News, Research|

For the Record: March 3, 2011

Anna Membrino's winning paintingAnna Membrino, a first-year M.F.A. student in Meadows School of the Arts, has been named one of three national winners of the 2010 Canvas Artist Series Contest sponsored by Hyatt Hotels & Resorts and Folio Fine Wine Partners. She won for her design of the merlot label (pictured right) for the Canvas wine brand. The three contest winners were selected by public online voting and a panel of judges comprised of Folio and Hyatt executives, as well as other wine industry professionals. In addition to having their artwork displayed on the Canvas bottle, the winners each receive a $5,000 scholarship from Hyatt. Read more from SMU News.

Carla Mendiola, a Ph.D. candidate in history in Dedman College, has been selected for a Government of Canada Doctoral Student Research Award, which “promotes research that contributes to a better knowledge and understanding of Canada, its relationship with the United States, and its international affairs.” The grant will allow her to conduct dissertation research in Canada.

The SMU Office of Public Affairs won five awards in the 2011 Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District IV competition. The Content Group received two prizes in the Blog category: a Gold Award for SMU Adventures and a Silver Award for the SMU Forum. The SMU Research news site received a Silver Award in the World Wide Web Sub Site or Section category. Kim Cobb received a Silver Award in the Medical/Scientific News Writing category for “SMU-led Research Center Aims to Connect Brain Signals to Robotic Limbs,” and Eva Parks received a Bronze Award in the Film or Video-Feature category for “The World’s Oldest Christmas Card.” The winners were announced Feb. 22 at the CASE Fusion annual conference in New Orleans.

March 3, 2011|For the Record|

For the Record: Aug. 27, 2010

Asteroid 213629 BinfordLewis Binford, Anthropology, Dedman College, has been honored with an asteroid named for him by the International Astronomical Union. The naming citation for Asteroid (213629) Binford reads, in part, “[Lewis Binford] was one of the main figures behind the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ or ‘Processual Archaeology,’ the major theoretical and methodological improvements to archaeology taking place during the 1960s to 1980s.”

The object was discovered in November 2004 on images taken in August 2002 by the 1.2-meter Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) telescope at Mt. Palomar, California. It is an MB II asteroid, orbiting between Mars and Jupiter with an orbital period of 4 years, a minimum distance to the sun of 2.38 astronomical units (AU) and an estimated size of slightly over 1 kilometer. See the asteroid’s 3D orbit diagram at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory website. (Top right, a composite of three images documenting the asteroid’s discovery, showing it as a tiny moving dot. Click the image for a larger version. Images courtesy of NEAT/NASA.)

Lynne Jackson, Music, Meadows School of the Arts, has received a 2010 Meritorious Achievement Award from the Texas Bandmasters Association (TBA). TBA President and SMU professor Brian Merrill presented the award during the organization’s annual convention and clinic in July in San Antonio. The award honors “those who have made a difference in the lives of band students in Texas” and “who exemplify the qualities of a good band director.”

Cat with serape, ca. 1860Norwick Center for Digital Services, Central University Librares, has received a $20,000 TexTreasures grant to digitize, catalog and upload 2,500 items into the University’s Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection. The annual competitive grant program is designed to help member libraries make their special collections more accessible. Funding is available for projects that involve cataloging, indexing, and digitizing local materials with statewide significance.

NCDS and DeGolyer Library will digitize 19th-century photographs from the Lawrence T. Jones Texas photography collection . This collection, which contains 5,000 photographs, depicts Texans from a variety of cultural groups: Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian, as well as locations from all regions of the state. (Bottom right, Cat posed with Mexican serape, ca. 1860 from the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection.)

August 27, 2010|For the Record|

For the Record: Feb. 18, 2010

Brent Sumerlin, Chemistry, Dedman College, has been selected as a 2010-2012 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The award carries a grant of $50,000 to support his research. The Sloan Research Fellowships “seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise,” according to the foundation’s website. The 2-year fellowships are awarded annually to 118 researchers “in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.” More than 30 Sloan Research Fellows have won Nobel Prizes later in their careers.

Ron Wetherington, Anthropology, Dedman College, has been selected to receive a “Friend of Darwin” award from the National Center for Science Education. Wetherington, who also serves as director of SMU’s Center for Teaching Excellence, was honored for his advocacy on behalf of science by the NCSE, which supports the teaching of evolution in public schools. Read more.

February 18, 2010|For the Record|
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