Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

grant programs

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

November 7, 2013|For the Record, News, Research|

Seven SMU professors receive 2012-13 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Seven SMU faculty members have received Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Sam Taylor Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for 2012-13, and their projects:

• Carlos Cardoza-Orlandi, Perkins School of Theology, for a project on cross-cultural short-term mission trips and partnerships.

• Erin Hochman, History, Dedman College, for research investigating German-Austrian nationalism and history between the two World Wars.

• Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology, Dedman College, for a study investigating how children interpret marital conflict.

• Alicia Meuret, Psychology, Dedman College, for a study on the impact of stress on self-injuring behavior.

• Amy Pinkham, Psychology, Dedman College, to collect data comparing social cognition in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

• Lorelei Rowe, Psychology, Dedman College, to extend a preventive program and study on reducing sexual victimization among teen girls.

• Sze-kar Wan, Perkins School of Theology, for consultation with mainland Chinese scholars on political theology and their engagement with continental Europen philosophers.

For more information on the Fellowships, including application instructions, contact Kathleen Hugley-Cook, director of the University’s Office of National Fellowships and Awards.

Visit SMU’s National Fellowships and Awards homepage

November 20, 2012|For the Record, News|

Real-life adventurers share stories as ‘National Geographic Presents’ at SMU

'National Geographic Presents' speakers John Francis, Carsten Peter and Conrad Anker

Real-life adventurers bring the National Geographic Society to the Hilltop for “An Evening of Field Research and Exploration” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 2 in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

Dr. John Francis – NatGeo’s vice president of research, conservation and exploration – will host the discussion. The featured speakers include Carsten Peter, award-winning NatGeo photographer and explorer; and Conrad Anker, renowned alpinist and North Face climbing team member.

An extension of SMU’s Young Explorers Grants Workshop, this event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 7 p.m.; all seating is general admission. The evening is hosted by SMU with support from the National Geographic Society, the Brinson Foundation, Billingsley Company, The North Face, Kiehl’s and ProBar.

RSVP online or contact Carla Scott, 214-768-4222.

April 1, 2011|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU students stand up for Texas Tuition Equalization Grants

Save TEG table in Hughes-Trigg Student CenterSMU students who receive Texas state tuition assistance are speaking up against proposed budget cuts that could jeopardize the grant program that provides the funds.

The Tuition Equalization Grant (TEG) program provides financial aid to students attending 42 private Texas colleges and universities. It awards grants averaging $3,400 to about 28,000 Texans with financial need each year, nearly half of whom are minorities.

The TEG program faces cuts of more than 40 percent; the proposed budget cuts would eliminate about 10,000 students from the grant program. More than 1,500 SMU students received the grant for the 2010-11 academic year.

Vice President for Student Affairs Lori White encouraged the University’s TEG recipients “to contact your Texas legislators and express your opinion about this issue” in an e-mail sent earlier this week.

A group of students met with state legislators at the Texas Capitol on Wednesday, March 2, 2011 to express their support for the TEG program. They included senior and student body president Jake Torres; seniors Laura Baez, Daniela Balderas and Brian Quarles; junior Bethany Mackingtee; sophomore Erin Hoya; and first-year Ryan Swick. Fernando Salazar, coordinator of Latina/o Student Services in Student Activities & Multicultural Student Affairs, joined them on the trip.

“This was an opportunity to make our voices heard,” Torres said. “We were able to emphasize the importance of these grants to the SMU community and to Texas.”

Students are gathering in support of the TEG program in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons through 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 9. The students will have postcards and addresses to allow fellow TEG recipients to write to their representatives in the Texas Legislature.

(Above, SMU students and staff members at the Save TEG table in Hughes-Trigg Student Center include Gordon Brannon, Financial Aid; Fernando Salazar, SAMSA; senior Jake Torres, student body president; and junior Bethany Mackingtee. Photo by Isaac Cotherman.)

> Learn more from SMU News
> Read the students’ letter to the editor of The Dallas Morning News
> Read the students’ op-ed in The Austin American-Statesman
> Find coverage of the students’ Austin trip in the DMN’s Politics section
> More about SMU and TEG from the DMN Trailblazers blog
> Read and listen to coverage from KERA Public Radio audio

March 9, 2011|News|

Apply for Instructional Technology Grants by Nov. 15

SMU faculty members have until 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15, to apply for 2011 Instructional Technology Grants offered by the Office of the Provost and the Teaching with Technology Group. All full-time regular University faculty members are eligible.

The grants of up to $5,000 provide faculty members with funds to improve teaching and learning through the incorporation of technology, says Brad Boeke, director of Academic Technology Services in the University’s Office of Information Technology.

Funding will become available this semester, with work to be completed no later than Fall 2011.

To apply, submit a proposal (not to exceed 5 double-spaced pages plus cover sheet) with an endorsement by your chair or dean. All proposals should include the following:

  • A project description
  • Your expertise and/or the expertise to be acquired
  • The project’s relevance to your discipline, school, or department, including research
  • Criteria you will use to evaluate the success of the project
  • Proposed budget, indicating other related funding if applicable
  • Potential follow-up plans (e.g., seeking additional funding to continue or expand the project) if applicable

Send proposals to the Office of the Provost, Perkins Administration Building, Box 221.

Grant recipients will be notified by the Office of the Provost the week of Dec. 6, 2010. For more information and an application cover sheet, contact Brad Boeke, 214-768-2408.

November 12, 2010|News, Save the Date|
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