Cancer prevention pioneer Groesbeck Parham to receive honorary doctorate during SMU’s 2016 Commencement

Cancer prevention pioneer Groesbeck Parham to receive honorary doctorate during SMU’s 2016 Commencement

Groesbeck ParhamA simple procedure developed by Groesbeck Parham has saved the lives of thousands of women in Africa. Cervical cancer, easily screened with a Pap test and treated in developed countries, is fatal to 81 percent of Zambian women who have limited access to health care. Dr. Parham has developed a simple, affordable screening procedure using household vinegar as an indicator of abnormal cells.

Parham will receive a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from SMU during its 101st Commencement Saturday, May 14, 2016. In addition, he present a free, public symposium on his work from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11. The event, co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth, begins with a 2 p.m. reception in Harold Clark Simmons Hall.

For Zambian women, cervical cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and particularly dangerous to HIV-infected women. Parham helped develop a simple and inexpensive screening procedure that has been used by 350,000 Zambian women and has been adopted by health providers in countries from South Africa to China.

Four SMU students traveled in 2013 with former President George W. Bush and Laura Bush and SMU Global Health Professor Eric Bing to volunteer with Parham in Zambia. Other SMU students also have worked with Parham to develop cervical cancer research applications.

Parham is a gynecologic oncologist and professor of gynecology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He has spent much of the past 30 years in Africa, however, where he is helping lead and implement Zambia’s first national cervical cancer control program.

Parham’s work to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America is supported by Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a partnership founded by the George W. Bush Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, UNAIDS and the Zambian government.

Parham will receive an honorary degree at SMU’s May 14 Commencement Convocation.

May 11, 2016|Calendar Highlights, For the Record, News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 25, 2013


Dr. Eric Bing via George W. Bush Institute

New adventures in global health: SMU and Bush Institute concurrent appointee Eric Bing will speak on conquering the challenges of global health in “Making a Cure for Cancer as Accessible as Coca-Cola” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. His lecture will include discussion of his work as creator of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, an $85 million public-private partnership to reduce cervical and breast cancer in low-resource settings. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He is Senior Fellow and Director of Global Health in the George W. Bush Institute and a professor of global health in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in Dedman College’s Department of Anthropology. The lecture is free.

The Usefulness of Art: Meadows Prize winner Tania Bruguera and SMU Associate Professor of Art Noah Simblist will host a conversation on the use of art in exploring real-world issues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 at the Texas Theatre, 213 W. Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Bruguera, a 2013-14 Meadows Prize Winner and Meadows Visiting Artist, founded Immigrant Movement International, a think tank for immigrant issues that offers free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to the immigrant community. Simblist won the 2007 Moss/Chumley Artist Award presented by the Meadows Museum and was recently a guest blogger for Art21. The conversation is presented by Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas and SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

Stanton Sharp Lecture: SMU’s Clements Department of History presents “Revolution, Reform and Rejuvenation: A Century of Intellectual Service in ChinaWednesday, Sept. 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Timothy Cheek, professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research in the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, will speak on China’s intellectuals from the start of Modern Turmoil in the 1890s to the declared “victory” of a Rising China at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek will explore China’s intellectuals by tracking five notable Chinese from across the century who all sought to “serve the people.” Cheek has written three books and is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao. The event begins with a reception at 6 p.m.; the lecture follows at 6:30 p.m.

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales, via Riviera 24

Music at Meadows: Brothers Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales will perform a chamber program for piano and guitar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 in the Bob & Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The duo was born in Spain, have performed throughout the world and recorded five albums. Critics rave that their music is “unique in the way both instruments melt as one with grand elegance and fine touch.” The concert is free and open to the public.

September 25, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Bing joins SMU faculty in concurrent appointment with Bush Institute

Eric G. Bing

Eric G. Bing has joined the faculties of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

Global health researcher Eric G. Bing has joined the SMU faculty as professor of global health in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

At SMU, Bing has been named a professor of global health in the Applied Physiology and Wellness Department of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He remains the senior fellow and director of global health at the Bush Institute.

Under the SMU agreement with the Bush Foundation, Bush Institute fellows can receive concurrent academic appointments at SMU following review and approval by the appropriate academic departments.

“Dr. Bing’s faculty appointment represents one of the many benefits of hosting the Bush Presidential Center at SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Center will bring us access to global experts who will enhance teaching and research at SMU through concurrent appointments with the Bush Institute. These are scholars with whom we otherwise would not have a relationship but who will now have productive interactions and collaborations with existing faculty, as well as students.”

As director of global health at the Bush Institute since 2010, Bing has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America.

“It would be difficult to exaggerate the value that Dr. Bing brings to SMU,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “In his career he has directed or co-directed five global health research centers and received more than $140 million in grant support. His work in combating the spread of AIDS is a model for future Africa-United States projects.”

Before joining the Bush Institute, Bing was an endowed professor of global health for nearly 20 years at the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. He has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. For his efforts he was awarded the Alfred Haynes International Health Leadership Award in 2002, named in 2006 a Paul G. Rogers International Health Research Ambassador from Research! America and named 2010 Professor of the Year at Charles Drew University.

“We are extremely pleased that Dr. Bing has joined the SMU faculty in addition to his work at the Bush Institute,” said James K. Glassman, executive director of the George W. Bush Institute. “It is the latest example of the excellent cooperation between our two institutions.”

“It’s an honor to join the SMU faculty,” said Bing. “Across campus, in every college, there is an abundance of talent and resources, supported by strong leadership at all levels.  SMU is an ideal place to build effective and productive partnerships that not only cross the campus, but the world.”

Bing has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. He received his medical degree from Harvard University School of Medicine, a Master’s of Public Health and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.  His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, is scheduled to be released in May 2013.

Written by Nancy George

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March 5, 2013|News|
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