Gilbert Lecture Series

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan to visit SMU Feb. 25, 2016

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Kay RyanFormer U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan will present a reading of her poetry at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25, following a 6 p.m. reception in room 131 of SMU’s Dedman Life Sciences Building.

The event is cohosted by SMU English Professor Willard Spiegelman, the SMU Department of English and the Gilbert Lecture Series.

“Ryan will be reading from her poetry, presumably a mix of recent and earlier work,” Spiegelman says. “She is very engaging, humorous and compatible in an approachable way. She has a wonderful stage presence.”

In addition to serving as the nation’s 16th Poet Laureate from 2008-2010, Ryan has won a Pulitzer Prize and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011 – a prestigious distinction.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the SMU Department of English at 214-768-2945.

— Kenny Ryan

Calendar Highlights: April 4, 2013

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photo c/o SMU English

Gilbert Lecture Series: The Department of English presents a lecture on Zimbabwean writer NoViolet Bulawayo by Elizabeth Tshele on Thursday, April 4. Tshele, herself born and raised in Zimbabwe, earned her M.A. from SMU in 2007. She will also read from her new book, We Need New Names, which will be released this summer. The event takes place in DeGolyer Library with a reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room and lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. It is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required.

Haute culture: On Thursday, April 4, SMU’s Meadows Museum presents “The Art of Fashion,” a lecture by Myra Walker, University of North Texas professor and curator and director of UNT’s Texas Fashion Collection. In 2007 she was guest curator at the Meadows for its blockbuster exhibition Balenciaga and His Legacy: Haute Couture from the Texas Fashion Collection. The lecture coincides with the second annual SMU Fashion Week, a five-day campus event in collaboration with Meadows School of the Arts, the Division of Journalism’s Minor in Fashion Media Program, and the SMU Retail Club. The event is free and open to the public and begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Museum’s Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium.

Ambivalent resistance: The Thinking about Agency Series presents Sherry Ortner, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at UCLA, on “The Case of Gendered Agency” at 3:15 p.m. Friday, April 5. Ortner has done fieldwork with the Sherpas of Nepal and has received numerous grants and fellowships. The lecture takes place in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, and is free and open to the public.

Slavery Symposium: The William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies and The School for Advanced Research present “Uniting The Histories of Slavery in North America and its Borderlands” on Saturday, April 6. The all-day public symposium will bring together specialists in history, anthropology, folklore and psychology to speak on slavery and the areas of the country it affected in the past. Panelists will present their research and results, and a moderator will guide questions and discussion between the panelists and the audience. The event begins at 10 a.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

Below is an overview of the day:

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Calendar Highlights: Sept. 21, 2012

Ilona Romule: Creamer Horse (courtesy of Ferrin Gallery)

Art smart: Ceramicist Ilona Romule will be at SMU Monday, Sept. 24, to give the Meadows Visiting Artist Lecture. Romule’s unique work is simultaneously two-and three-dimensional: She draws figures on the sides of her pots and sculpts them partially emerging from the pots as three-dimensional forms. She is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics and has participated in international competitions and exhibitions. The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. in the Greer Garson Screening Room of the Owen Arts Center and is free to the public.

SYZGY: The Meadows new music ensemble SYZGY will open its 2012-13 season Friday, Sept. 28 with a program featuring work by composer John Adams and led by ensemble director Matt Albert. The strings, winds and percussions can be heard at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Raúl Coronado

“We the Pueblo of Texas”: The Gilbert Lecture Series kicks off at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, with an event focused on Latino studies and hosted by Raúl Coronado. Coronado is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago, a past resident of SMU as a Bill and Rita Clements Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America, and the author of A World Not to Come: A History of 19th-Century Latino Writing, Print Culture, and the Disenchantment of the World. Coronado is currently working on a study of the historical emergence of queer Latino/a subjectivities; hear all of his insights in DeGolyer Library.

True to Texas: Y’all are in for a treat, because the 2012 State Fair of Texas begins Friday, Sept. 28 and runs daily through Saturday, Oct. 21. The fair kicks off with a ceremony at 7 a.m. and a parade through downtown Dallas at noon. Highlights include the Reliant Starlight Parade, the State Fair Auto Show, livestock shows, the U.S. Marine Drum and Bugle Corps, the Chevrolet Main Stage featuring artists like Kellie Pickler and Kevin Fowler, and all the fried food your heart desires. General admission is $16; call 214-565-9931 for more information.

Faculty artistry: Chee-Yun Kim and Alessio Bax are more than SMU faculty members: They are also internationally renowned musicians who have won the Avery Fisher Career Grant. At 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, Chee-Yun will play the violin and Bax the piano as they perform pieces from composers Ferruccio Busoni and Beethoven as part of the Faculty Artist and Distinguished Alumni Recital Series. The performance is in Caruth Auditorium and costs $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Calendar Highlights: April 5, 2011

Susanne ScholzFound in translation: Is it political correctness or linguistic skill that makes for a good Bible translation? Susanne Scholz (right), associate professor of Old Testament in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, will discuss “God’s Word as Man’s Word? The Politics of Translating the Sacred Texts of Christianity and Judaism” at 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 5, in the Bridwell Library Benefactors Room. Reception to follow. Free and open to the public; no RSVP required.

Cutting the cord: Writer and scholar Terry Castle – Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University and author of National Book Critics Circle Award nominee The Professor and Other Writings – discusses “Becoming an Orphan: Helicopter Parents, Velcro Moms and Self-Education” as part of the 2010-11 Gilbert Lecture Series Thursday, April 7, in DeGolyer Library. A 6 p.m. reception in the Texana Room precedes the 6:30 p.m. lecture in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. Free and open to the public.

The spiritual network: Author, speaker and activist Brian McLaren will speak on seeking vital connections with God and others in a lecture that springs from his new book, Naked Spirituality: A Life with God in 12 Simple Words. The event includes a book signing session and will take place 2-4 p.m. Saturday, April 9, in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Sponsored by the Center for Missional Wisdom in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology. For more information, contact Rev. Dr. Elaine Heath, 214-768-2167. Learn more about McLaren’s talk from the Perkins website.

Yolande Moreau in 'Seraphine'French Film Festival concludes: The 15th-anniversary celebration of SMU’s French Film Festival continues through April 9, 2011. The final screenings include Indigènes (Days of Glory, 2006) on Wednesday, April 6. César and Lumière award-winning cowriter and director Rachid Bouchareb tells the stories of four North African recruits who fight to liberate France during World War II, as well as for equal treatment in the French military and society. The film will be followed by a discussion with Hervé Tchumkam, assistant professor in Dedman College’s Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and an expert in French, Francophone, African and postcolonial studies. The festival wraps up Saturday, April 9, with Séraphine (2008), starring César Award-winner Yolande Moreau as painter Séraphine de Senlis, a housekeeper who became one of the most acclaimed naïve artists of the 1920s and ’30s before dying in an insane asylum in 1942. All screenings are at 7 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater, and all films will be shown in French with English subtitles. Admission is free and open to the public. These films are intended for an adult audience and may contain sexual content, nudity and violence. Sponsored by the SMU French Club, the SMU Students’ Association and the Tournées Festival. For more information and a complete schedule, visit the 2011 French Film Festival homepage. (Right, Yolande Moreau in Séraphine.)

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 16, 2010

Worldly beats: Percussion and improvisation take center stage in this semester’s installment of the Meadows World Music Ensemble, directed by Jamal Mohamed. Exotic percussion instruments from Africa, Asia and the Middle East are prominently featured with more “Western” instruments like the vibraphone, keyboard and guitar. A mix of traditional works, original pieces and good old ‘jamming’ sessions is the order of the night. The performance is at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 16 in the Bob Hope Theatre in Meadows. Admission is free. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Eric SundquistA Gilbert for the road: The SMU Department of English‘s final installment of the Fall 2010 Gilbert Lecture Series is almost here. This week’s speaker is Eric Sundquist (pictured), author and the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University. His lecture, “We Dreamed a Dream: Larry Ellison, Martin Luther King Jr., and Barack Obama,” covers the unfinished second novel of acclaimed author Larry Ellison, who in over 40 years of civil rights coverage unearthed a lot of truths about race in America, ranging from the MLK days to the Obama presidency. The reading is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Admission is free. A reception precedes the reading at 6 p.m. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series website.

Break out the jazz hands: The Meadows Jazz Orchestra, directed by Akira Sato, will conduct an exploration of traditional large ensemble jazz pieces, as well as introducing new student and professional works into the mix – including pieces by Sato, other Meadows faculty and current jazz students. Admission is free for the performance, which begins at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Aug. 31, 2010

Pearl rosary in shell from the Bridget Anne Braithwaite Rosary CollectionWelcome back, faculty: The SMU Faculty Club will be holding a Welcome Back BBQ 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sept. 9. The cost is $5 per Faculty Club member. For more information contact Dee Powell, 214-768-4858, or visit smu.edu/facultyclub.

Rosary exhibit opens: SMU’s newest exhibit, the Bridget Anne Braithwaite Rosary Collection, is open for public viewing at Bridwell Library. The exhibit highlights a small selection of more than 320 rosaries from various cultures and regions, ranging from the 19th to the 20th century. The collection was donated to the Perkins School of Theology in June 2008 by the parents of Bridget Anne Braithwaite, and 15 selected rosaries will be on display until Dec. 12.

A taste of the Renaissance: Princeton Professor of Literature Leonard Barkan will lecture on “Some Pages from Michelangelo’s Life” as part of the 2010-11 Gilbert Lecture Series Sept. 9. Currently, Barkan is on academic leave from Princeton, touring and researching for an upcoming book on Michelangelo’s drawings and writings. A short reception will take place at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room of SMU’s DeGolyer Library, followed by the reading at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. Find upcoming Gilbert Lecture Series events online.

“Portraits of Muhammad”: On Sept. 2, Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Johan Elverskog will speak on a topic of recent global controversy in “Portraits of Muhammad: From Genghis Khan to South Park.” The Dedman College-sponsored event begins at 7 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. For more information, contact the Department of Religious Studies at 214-768-2095 or visit www.smu.edu/religiousstudies.

Your future…in video games: The Guildhall at SMU will hold an open house 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 11 at 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2 in Plano. Anyone interested in pursuing a degree or certificates= in software development, art creation or level design in videogaming can register for the event online – only 100 spots remain. Immediately following the two-hour symposium, lunch will be served at the Guildhall’s Gigantic Block Party. For more information, contact René Archambault, manager of admissions and alumni affairs, 972-473-3539.

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 3, 2009

Akira SatoAll that jazz: SMU’s Meadows Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Akira Sato (right) presents an evening of small-group jazz featuring classic works such as Stella by Starlight by Victor Young, Take Five by Dave Brubeck, Windows by Chick Corea and Groovin’ High by Dizzy Gillespie. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music at 214-768-1951.

Maguire Public Scholar Lecture: Law Professor Jenia Turner will examine the limits of advocacy in representing clients accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide in “Ethical Dilemmas of International Criminal Defense Attorneys,” part of the “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” series. The lecture takes place noon-1 p.m. Nov. 5 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West and Central Ballrooms; heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served at 11:30 a.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program. Free and open to the public; no RSVP necessary.

Gilbert Lecture Series: Poet Jeff Dolven, professor of Renaissance literature at Princeton University and author of Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance, speaks on “Styles of Disjunction” Nov. 5 in DeGolyer Library. Reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room; lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. Free and open to the public. Presented by the Department of English, Dedman College.

Meadows Chamber Music Showcase: Performers will present chamber works ranging from the early Classical period to the 20th century at 8 p.m. Nov. 6 and 2 p.m. Nov. 8 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 22, 2009

'Tainted Souls and Painted Faces' book coverGilbert Lecture Series: Johns Hopkins University Professor Amanda Anderson (Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture) will discuss the role of political ideology in the works of authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell and Anthony Trollope in “Politics and the 19th-Century British Novel” Sept. 22 in DeGolyer Library. Reception in the Texana Room at 6 p.m., lecture in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room at 6:30 p.m. Cosponsored by the Department of English and DeGolyer Library. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series homepage.

Turn down the noise: Feeling the burn of too much stress? Learn positive ways to cope at noon Sept. 23 in Room 205, Memorial Health Center. Faculty and staff earn 1 Wellpower credit for attending. Sponsored by Counseling and Psychiatric Services. For more information, contact Marianne Stout.

Celebrating Darwin: Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and The Friends of KERA host a celebration of the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species and the 200th birthday of Charles Darwin Sept. 24 in DeGolyer Library. Guest speakers include Paula Apsell (’08 honoris causa), “NOVA” senior executive producer; and Melanie Wallace, “NOVA” senior series producer. Reception at 10 a.m., lecture at 10:30 a.m. RSVP to 214-768-3225 or Cynthia Ruppi.

'Beyond Nations' by John Chavez, bookcover“Tragic” love: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 6 (“Tragic”) at 8 p.m. Sept. 25 and 3 p.m. Sept. 27 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Clements Center Brown Bag: SMU History Professor John Chávez will discuss his new book tracing the evolution of “peripheral” ethnic homelands around the North Atlantic in “Beyond Nations: Evolving Homelands in the North Atlantic World, 1400-2000.” The event begins at noon Sept. 30 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch.

Sounds of India: The Meadows School of the Arts presents a concert of classical South Indian music with percussionist and Grammy Award nominee Poovalur Srinivasan and his group, Karnatic Kutcherri, at noon Sept. 30 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. The show is part of the Expanding Your Horizons Brown Bag Concert Series. Admission is free; bring your lunch. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: April 14, 2009

artshow.jpgMaster of Fine Arts Qualifying Exhibition: With spring comes the annual exhibition of the Division of Art’s graduate students works, featuring art in a wide-ranging variety of styles and media. The event is open daily from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. until April 18 in the Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. For more information, contact Victoria Winkelman, 214-768-4439.

Documentaries at their best: SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and Division of Cinema-Television welcome Fred Wiseman, regarded as one of the world’s greatest living documentary filmmakers, at 6 p.m. April 14, Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. Wiseman’s body of work includes Titicut Follies and High School and Domestic Violence, which won numerous honors including a Peabody Award for Significant and Meritorious Achievement. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required. For more information and to make a reservation, call 214-768-2787.

sexandsoulbook.jpgLet’s talk about sex: Boston University professor Donna Freitas will be on campus April 15 to discuss her research and her book “Sex and the Soul”, which focuses on juggling sexuality, spirituality, romance and religion on America’s college campuses. There will be a faculty and staff light lunch and lecture at 11:30 a.m. in the Umphrey Lee Ballroom. RSVP to Edilson Volfe. In addition, Freitas will hold a student forum at 5 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. For more information, call 214-768-4502.

T.BoonePickens.jpgFinding a better way: SMU’s Maguire Energy Institute hosts a town hall meeting with T. Boone Pickens at 2 p.m. April 16 in McFarlin Auditorium. Pickens is the author of The First Billion is the Hardest, and the first 200 SMU students at the event will receive a free autographed copy of his book. The lecture will focus on The Pickens Plan: Ending Our Dependence on Foreign Oil. The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

Gilbert Lecture Series: SMU’s Dedman College and Department of English present Alan Liu and “Digital Humanities and Academic Change” at 6:30 p.m. April 16 in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room, DeGolyer Library. Professor Liu argues that the digital humanities are catalyzing fundamental changes in humanities practices and organization. The event opens with a 6 p.m. reception in the Texana Room. Free and open to the public. For more information contact Leslie Reid 214-768-2946.

smurealy.jpgUp all night to make a difference: SMU and Panhellenic sponsor the 6th annual Relay for Life April 17 on Bishop Boulevard. The event celebrates cancer survivorship and raises money for research and programs for the American Cancer Society. Students participating in the evening-long team relay will walk non-stop around the Boulevard to symbolize that cancer never sleeps and the need to move forward in the fight against it. Free and open to the public; visit the website to join a team or donate to the cause.

David SedarisIn McFarlin Auditorium:

April 19: The Dallas Metropolitan Ballet presents the classic ballet comedy Coppelia at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 214-631-2787.

April 19: The Dallas Museum of Art presents author, humorist and commentator David Sedaris at 7:30 p.m., benefiting the Kay Cattarulla Endowment for the Literary and Performing Arts. Sold out. For more information, visit the DMA website.

Calendar Highlights: March 24, 2009

Rebekah HurtGartner Honors Lecture: Former SMU Honors Program student Rebekah Hurt (’06, top right), a 2004 Richter Scholar and recipient of a Marshall Scholarship, will discuss representations of the ‘been-to’ – an African who has been to Britain or America, usually to study, and who has subsequently returned home – in African fiction since 1911, and elements of the ‘been-to’ experience that resonate across national and historical lines. Her lecture, “Responsibilities of the ‘Been-To’ in African Literature and the Experience of an SMU Marshall,” begins at 3:30 p.m. March 24 in Hughes-Trigg Student Center Promenade AB.

Ancient mysteries: World-renowned archaeologist Zahi Hawass, secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, will share new scientific findings from Tutankhamun’s tomb in a lecture presented by the Dallas Museum of Art. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. March 24 in McFarlin Auditorium. Tickets are $22 (student rate) to $37 and will be available at the box office.

Etruscan 'canopic' urnVisiting Artist Lecture Series: The Meadows Museum presents Ranjani Shettar at 6:30 p.m. March 24 in the Dr. Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. Shettar, a native of Bangalore, India, creates sculptural installations that use a wide range of materials from the organic to the industrial to evoke the present collision of high-tech Bangalore with its rural surroundings. For more information, contact Victoria Winkelman, 214-768-2489.

Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Writer and film/video maker Gregg Bordowitz, author of The AIDS Crisis Is Ridiculous and Other Writings, 1986-2003 and faculty member in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will speak at 6:30 p.m. March 26 in the Dr. Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum.

Gilbert Lecture Series: Film theorist Sharon Willis explores how the films of Sidney Poitier manage the contradictions generated in their stories of interracial encounter and reconciliation, as well as Poitier’s iconic weight within white liberal discourse, in “Black Mentors and White Redemption: The Extraordinary Career of Sidney Poitier.” The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. March 26 in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room, DeGolyer Library. Presented by the Department of English and DeGolyer Library. For more information contact Leslie Reid, 214-768-2946.

Parsons Dance CompanyFriday Gallery Talk: Anne Bromberg, Cecil and Ida Green Curator of Ancient and Asian Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, will speak on “Exploring Etruscan Art” at 12:15 p.m. March 27 in the Jake and Nancy Hamon Galleries, Meadows Museum.

In McFarlin Auditorium:
March 27-28: TITAS presents the Parsons Dance Company at 8 p.m. For tickets, call 214-528-5576.

Compiled by Theresa Nelson (’09).

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