Cancer prevention pioneer Groesbeck Parham to receive honorary doctorate during SMU’s 2016 Commencement

George W. Bush

Cancer prevention pioneer Groesbeck Parham to receive honorary doctorate during SMU’s 2016 Commencement

Groesbeck ParhamA simple procedure developed by Groesbeck Parham has saved the lives of thousands of women in Africa. Cervical cancer, easily screened with a Pap test and treated in developed countries, is fatal to 81 percent of Zambian women who have limited access to health care. Dr. Parham has developed a simple, affordable screening procedure using household vinegar as an indicator of abnormal cells.

Parham will receive a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from SMU during its 101st Commencement Saturday, May 14, 2016. In addition, he present a free, public symposium on his work from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11. The event, co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth, begins with a 2 p.m. reception in Harold Clark Simmons Hall.

For Zambian women, cervical cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and particularly dangerous to HIV-infected women. Parham helped develop a simple and inexpensive screening procedure that has been used by 350,000 Zambian women and has been adopted by health providers in countries from South Africa to China.

Four SMU students traveled in 2013 with former President George W. Bush and Laura Bush and SMU Global Health Professor Eric Bing to volunteer with Parham in Zambia. Other SMU students also have worked with Parham to develop cervical cancer research applications.

Parham is a gynecologic oncologist and professor of gynecology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He has spent much of the past 30 years in Africa, however, where he is helping lead and implement Zambia’s first national cervical cancer control program.

Parham’s work to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America is supported by Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a partnership founded by the George W. Bush Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, UNAIDS and the Zambian government.

Parham will receive an honorary degree at SMU’s May 14 Commencement Convocation.

May 11, 2016|Calendar Highlights, For the Record, News|

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough honored with SMU’s 2015 Tower Medal of Freedom

George W Bush, David McCullough, Laura Bush, Jeanne Tower Cox, and Penny Tower Cook

(l. to r.) President George W. Bush, David McCullough, First Lady Laura Bush, SMU trustee Jeanne Tower Cox and her sister, Penny Tower Cook.

Historian David McCullough received the Medal of Freedom from SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015.

President and Mrs. George W. Bush presented the award to the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, often called “America’s greatest historian,” during an event held at the home of Kelli and Gerald J. Ford. The evening’s highlights included a featured conversation between McCullough and his longtime friend, former U.S. Sen. Alan Simpson (R-WY).

McCullough also spoke to the SMU campus community at a question-and-answer session earlier in the day moderated by Tower Center Scholar Sara Jendrusch in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater.

The award is given by the Tower Center every two years to an individual or individuals who have contributed to the advancement of democratic ideals and to the security, prosperity and welfare of humanity.

McCullough, who said he had “always been impressed with SMU,” quizzed his audience of SMU students, faculty and staff and expressed approval that taking history is an SMU graduation requirement. “I was stunned to learn that something like 80 percent of colleges these days don’t require it,” he said.

> Read David McCullough’s advice on writing at Overheard @ SMU

The historian said he has about 25 more book ideas he’d like to see in print. He credited much of his success to the editing skills of his wife, Rosalee, “my editor-in-chief for 50 years.” He spoke lovingly about the craft of writing and confessed that he still composes his work using technology now consigned to history for most people – a 1960s typewriter.

And history, McCullough said, is how you make life matter.

“It’s not a series of chronological events. It’s human,” McCullough said. “That’s why Jefferson wrote, ‘When in the course of human events…” in the Declaration of Independence.”

> Read the full story at SMU News

November 20, 2015|News|

SMU celebrates historic 100th Commencement May 15-16, 2015

December Commencement 2013, blue mortarboards in Moody Coliseum, SMU

SMU will celebrate its 100th Commencement May 15-16, 2015 with an address by former President George W. Bush and a weekend of events for faculty, alumni, community members and more than 2,000 graduating students.

The 43rd president of the United States will speak at the all-University ceremony, which begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 16, in Moody Coliseum. Guests are urged to arrive early. Security screening will be in place, and seating in the coliseum is limited to four guests per student. Doors will open at 7 a.m.

The ceremony will be simulcast live at the following locations; no entry ticket is required:

  • Bolin Plaza, at the west entrance of Moody Coliseum (outdoor screen)
  • Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports
  • Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Building
  • McFarlin Auditorium

The ceremony will also be webcast live at smu.edu/livevideo

Follow SMU’s 100th Commencement weekend on Twitter at #SMU2015

SMU will confer three honorary degrees during the 2015 Commencement ceremonies:

  • Meave Leakey will receive the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, for her achievements as one of the world’s most distinguished paleoanthropologists. She is a research associate at the National Museums of Kenya, director of Plio-Pleistocene research at the Turkana Basin Institute, Nairobi, and research professor in anthropology at Stony Brook University, New York. In 2002 she was named a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. Leakey is a foreign associate of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and an honorary fellow of the Geological Society of London.
  • Irene Hirano Inouye will receive the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, for her leadership in international relations. While still in her 20s, she began tailoring her career toward service as director of a Los Angeles medical clinic providing affordable care for poor and uninsured women. She helped build the Japanese American National Museum, which opened in 1992, and became the founding president of the U.S.-Japan Council in 2008. Inouye currently serves as chair of the board of the Ford Foundation. She also serves on the executive boards of Independent Sector, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Smithsonian Institution, the American Association of Museums, and the President’s Committee.
  • Helen LaKelly Hunt will receive the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, both for her work for healthy marriages and family and her efforts in helping to build the global women’s funding movement. The SMU alumna is the founder of The Sister Fund, a private foundation that supports women’s social, political, economic and spiritual empowerment. She has helped establish several other organizations, including Dallas Women’s FoundationNew York Women’s Foundation, Women’s Funding Network and Women Moving Millions. Her books include Faith and Feminism: A Holy Alliance, as well as seven books on intimate relationships and parenting co-authored with her husband, Harville Hendrix.

Make plans to attend the 2015 Honorary Degree Symposia Friday, May 15

The weekend’s activities include the Baccalaureate Service Friday, May 15, in McFarlin Auditorium. The service will be followed by Rotunda Recessional, a tradition in which seniors march through the Rotunda of Dallas Hall, marking the end of their undergraduate years and the beginning of their lifelong association with SMU as alumni.

More information at the SMU Registrar’s Commencement homepage: smu.edu/commencement

Some major events at a glance:

  • May 15 – Free public symposium honoring Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa recipient Helen LaKelly Hunt, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum
  • May 15 – Free public symposium honoring Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa recipient Meave Leakey, 2-4 p.m., McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall
  • May 15 – Free public symposium honoring Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa recipient Irene Hirano Inouye, 3:30-5 p.m., Hillcrest Appellate Courtroom and Classroom, Underwood Law Library
  • May 15-16 – Class of 1965 Golden Reunion, various times and locations
  • May 15 – Baccalaureate Service for undergraduates with SMU Associate Professor of Communication Studies, founding partner of Mustang Consulting and ordained minister Maria Dixon Hall delivering the featured speech, followed by Rotunda Recessional, 8 p.m., McFarlin Auditorium
  • May 16 – Faculty Breakfast and Distinguished University Citizen Awards presentation, 7:45 a.m., Champions Club, Miller Events Center, Moody Coliseum (for RSVPed faculty members only – walk-ups cannot be accommodated)
  • May 16 – All-University Commencement, 9 a.m., Moody Coliseum
  • May 16 – Commencement Buffet Luncheon, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Arnold Dining Commons
  • May 16 – School and departmental diploma presentations, various times and locations

> Find a full schedule of events at the SMU News homepage

May 14, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News, Year of the Student|

Former President George W. Bush will deliver address at SMU’s 2015 Commencement Saturday, May 16

George W BushGeorge W. Bush, the 43rd president of the United States, will deliver the address at SMU’s Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, in Moody Coliseum on the main campus.

“This Commencement is especially noteworthy because 2015 is the 100-year anniversary of SMU’s opening. So it is fitting that we should hear from a president who led our nation and the world during historic times and is a valued member of the campus community,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner.

SMU expects to award more than 2,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees in the University-wide ceremony.

This is the first time that an SMU Commencement speaker has returned for a second presentation. Mr. Bush’s first Commencement speech at SMU was in 1999, when he was governor of Texas.

George W. Bush has been a long-time member of the SMU family through his marriage to Laura, an SMU alumna, who is currently a member of the SMU Board of Trustees. However, since his 2007 decision to locate his Presidential Center at SMU, he has become an active member of the University community, attending events and visiting classes.

“The Presidential Center and SMU are enjoying numerous partnerships through joint programming and faculty research as well as internships for SMU students,” Turner said. “Through the Center, more than 700,000 people have visited SMU, most of whom never before would have come to our campus. We are grateful for the resources and benefits of the Presidential Center and President Bush’s participation as Commencement speaker during this special time.”

George W. Bush received his bachelor’s degree in history from Yale University and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School. After a successful career in business, including as an owner of the Texas Rangers, he was elected governor of Texas in 1994. When he was re-elected in November 1998, he became the first governor in Texas history to be elected to consecutive four-year terms. He is the author of two New York Times number one bestsellers, Decision Points and 41: A Portrait of my Father.

Following the University-wide Commencement, SMU’s schools and departments will hold individual ceremonies throughout the day to present degrees and honor graduates.

Written by Patricia Ann LaSalle

> Read more from SMU News

March 3, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News, Year of the Student|

Former Colombia president Álvaro Uribe delivers Tate Lecture May 7

Uribe

The 58th President of Colombia,  Álvaro Uribe, visits SMU Tuesday, May 7 for the last lecture of the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Willis M. Tate Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The 2013-14 Tate Lecture season will be announced at the beginning of this event.

Uribe had a history of public service and politics before serving as President of Colombia (2002-10). He got his start in 1976 as head of the Real Estate Office of the Public Works Department of Medellín, the following year he was Secretary General of  the Labor Ministry and from 1980-82 he was head of the Civil Aviation Department. Uribe served his final positions in Medellín as mayor in 1982 and city councilman from 1984-1986.

Uribe was elected Governor of the department of Antioquia for 1995-97 and was elected Senator for 1986-1990 and 1990-94. His work in Antioquia focused on schooling opportunities for students and healthcare for the poor; he received the Star Senator, Senator with the Best Programs and Best Senator awards.

> Follow Álvaro Uribe on Twitter @AlvaroUrbieVel

Campaignuribevelez

Photo from Uribe’s campaign, “firm hand, big heart” (c/o)

Uribe was elected President of Colombia in 2002 and was re-elected in 2006; he was the first president to be consecutively re-elected in Colombia in over a century. He is recognized for transforming the “failed state”; while he was in office homicides and kindnappings were dramatically reduced. In 2009, George W. Bush awarded President Uribe a Presidential Medal of Freedom “for his work to improve the lives of (his) citizens and for (his) efforts to promote democracy, human rights and peace abroad.”

In fall 2010, after the end of Uribe’s presidency, he came to the United States and spent a year at Georgetown University. He was the Distinguished Scholar in the Practice of Global Leadership at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. During this year he taught students in different disciplines and conducted seminars. In 2012 News Corporation welcomed Uribe to the Board of Directors.

Uribe received his degree in law from Universidad de Antioquia and his post-graduate degree from Harvard University in Management and Administration. He currently lives in Colombia with his wife and two sons.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU faculty, staff and students may attend for free (with ID) if seats become available. It is recommended to get to McFarlin at 7 p.m., seats are filled on a first come first served basis.

Uribe will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 7 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Uribe a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @AlvaroUrbieVel and the hashtag #SMUtate.

Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

May 7, 2013|Calendar Highlights, Tune In|
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