George W. Bush Institute

Cancer prevention pioneer Groesbeck Parham to receive honorary doctorate during SMU’s 2016 Commencement

Groesbeck ParhamA simple procedure developed by Groesbeck Parham has saved the lives of thousands of women in Africa. Cervical cancer, easily screened with a Pap test and treated in developed countries, is fatal to 81 percent of Zambian women who have limited access to health care. Dr. Parham has developed a simple, affordable screening procedure using household vinegar as an indicator of abnormal cells.

Parham will receive a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from SMU during its 101st Commencement Saturday, May 14, 2016. In addition, he present a free, public symposium on his work from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11. The event, co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth, begins with a 2 p.m. reception in Harold Clark Simmons Hall.

For Zambian women, cervical cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and particularly dangerous to HIV-infected women. Parham helped develop a simple and inexpensive screening procedure that has been used by 350,000 Zambian women and has been adopted by health providers in countries from South Africa to China.

Four SMU students traveled in 2013 with former President George W. Bush and Laura Bush and SMU Global Health Professor Eric Bing to volunteer with Parham in Zambia. Other SMU students also have worked with Parham to develop cervical cancer research applications.

Parham is a gynecologic oncologist and professor of gynecology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He has spent much of the past 30 years in Africa, however, where he is helping lead and implement Zambia’s first national cervical cancer control program.

Parham’s work to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America is supported by Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a partnership founded by the George W. Bush Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, UNAIDS and the Zambian government.

Parham will receive an honorary degree at SMU’s May 14 Commencement Convocation.

Three cheers: SMU Honors Day 2014 is Monday, April 21

Photo from SMU Honors Convocation 2013 by Kim RitzenthalerEvery third Monday in April, SMU takes a day to celebrate the high achievements of students, faculty and staff members in two different ceremonies.

This year’s Honors Convocation and Awards Extravaganza take place on the afternoon and evening of Monday, April 21, 2014.

2014 Honors Convocation award recipients (coming soon)

Eric Bing will deliver the address during the 17th Honors Convocation – celebrating academic achievement at the University and department levels – at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. Bing is professor of global health in the Department of Applied Physiology and Wellness in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He has a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute as senior fellow and director of global health.

Bing has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. At the Bush Institute, he has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the Institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America. In addition, he has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, was released in May 2013.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch Honors Convocation via live streaming Monday, April 21 at smu.edu/live

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2014 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. SMU Student Body President Ramon Trespalacios will speak at the event. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Photo from Honors Convocation 2013 by Kim Ritzenthaler

Find more information on Honors Convocation at the Registrar’s website
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 25, 2013

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Dr. Eric Bing via George W. Bush Institute

New adventures in global health: SMU and Bush Institute concurrent appointee Eric Bing will speak on conquering the challenges of global health in “Making a Cure for Cancer as Accessible as Coca-Cola” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. His lecture will include discussion of his work as creator of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, an $85 million public-private partnership to reduce cervical and breast cancer in low-resource settings. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He is Senior Fellow and Director of Global Health in the George W. Bush Institute and a professor of global health in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in Dedman College’s Department of Anthropology. The lecture is free.

The Usefulness of Art: Meadows Prize winner Tania Bruguera and SMU Associate Professor of Art Noah Simblist will host a conversation on the use of art in exploring real-world issues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 at the Texas Theatre, 213 W. Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Bruguera, a 2013-14 Meadows Prize Winner and Meadows Visiting Artist, founded Immigrant Movement International, a think tank for immigrant issues that offers free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to the immigrant community. Simblist won the 2007 Moss/Chumley Artist Award presented by the Meadows Museum and was recently a guest blogger for Art21. The conversation is presented by Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas and SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

Stanton Sharp Lecture: SMU’s Clements Department of History presents “Revolution, Reform and Rejuvenation: A Century of Intellectual Service in ChinaWednesday, Sept. 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Timothy Cheek, professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research in the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, will speak on China’s intellectuals from the start of Modern Turmoil in the 1890s to the declared “victory” of a Rising China at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek will explore China’s intellectuals by tracking five notable Chinese from across the century who all sought to “serve the people.” Cheek has written three books and is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao. The event begins with a reception at 6 p.m.; the lecture follows at 6:30 p.m.

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales, via Riviera 24

Music at Meadows: Brothers Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales will perform a chamber program for piano and guitar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 in the Bob & Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The duo was born in Spain, have performed throughout the world and recorded five albums. Critics rave that their music is “unique in the way both instruments melt as one with grand elegance and fine touch.” The concert is free and open to the public.

Bing joins SMU faculty in concurrent appointment with Bush Institute

Eric G. Bing

Eric G. Bing has joined the faculties of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

Global health researcher Eric G. Bing has joined the SMU faculty as professor of global health in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

At SMU, Bing has been named a professor of global health in the Applied Physiology and Wellness Department of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He remains the senior fellow and director of global health at the Bush Institute.

Under the SMU agreement with the Bush Foundation, Bush Institute fellows can receive concurrent academic appointments at SMU following review and approval by the appropriate academic departments.

“Dr. Bing’s faculty appointment represents one of the many benefits of hosting the Bush Presidential Center at SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Center will bring us access to global experts who will enhance teaching and research at SMU through concurrent appointments with the Bush Institute. These are scholars with whom we otherwise would not have a relationship but who will now have productive interactions and collaborations with existing faculty, as well as students.”

As director of global health at the Bush Institute since 2010, Bing has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America.

“It would be difficult to exaggerate the value that Dr. Bing brings to SMU,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “In his career he has directed or co-directed five global health research centers and received more than $140 million in grant support. His work in combating the spread of AIDS is a model for future Africa-United States projects.”

Before joining the Bush Institute, Bing was an endowed professor of global health for nearly 20 years at the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. He has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. For his efforts he was awarded the Alfred Haynes International Health Leadership Award in 2002, named in 2006 a Paul G. Rogers International Health Research Ambassador from Research! America and named 2010 Professor of the Year at Charles Drew University.

“We are extremely pleased that Dr. Bing has joined the SMU faculty in addition to his work at the Bush Institute,” said James K. Glassman, executive director of the George W. Bush Institute. “It is the latest example of the excellent cooperation between our two institutions.”

“It’s an honor to join the SMU faculty,” said Bing. “Across campus, in every college, there is an abundance of talent and resources, supported by strong leadership at all levels.  SMU is an ideal place to build effective and productive partnerships that not only cross the campus, but the world.”

Bing has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. He received his medical degree from Harvard University School of Medicine, a Master’s of Public Health and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.  His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, is scheduled to be released in May 2013.

Written by Nancy George

> Read more from SMU News

SMU faculty members mentor first Women’s Initiative Fellows

Eighteen SMU faculty members taught or mentored in the Women’s Initiative Fellowship Program of the George W. Bush Institute in 2012.

Under the program, 14 Egyptian women received leadership training “designed to empower women to transform their countries,” says Charity Wallace, director of the GWBI Women’s Initiative.

At SMU February 13-19, the fellows began their experience with leadership courses on topics such as influence without authority, negotiation, advocacy, and building teams and networks. SMU faculty in business, anthropology, communications, political science, law and education taught the courses. Several members of SMU faculty and staff also provided consultation in the development of the program and its curriculum.

The inaugural class of Egyptian women ranged in age from 23 to 52 and represented professions such as education, health, business, politics, law and media. They included both Muslims and Christians.

In addition to their SMU courses, the fellows visited local organizations such as Genesis Women’s Shelter and the Dallas Women’s Foundation to learn practical applications of their classroom work. The fellows also traveled to New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C., for additional training and mentoring.

“Working with the Egyptian women’s fellowship program was one of the best experiences I have had as a member of the SMU faculty,” says Linda Eads, law professor and associate provost, a mentor through the program. “The leadership training provided by the Cox Executive Education faculty was outstanding, and the substantive seminars provided by many faculty in other SMU schools were superb.

“The best part was meeting and interacting with the Egyptian women who were selected to participate,” Eads adds. “Each one has already accomplished so much in Egypt. Some are active in journalism, some in providing help for Egyptian women suffering domestic abuse, some in improving the Egyptian legal system. These women are inspiring.”

Eads began mentoring a young lawyer from Alexandria during her visit and communicates regularly with her since her return to Egypt, she says. “She and I are working together to expand her network and her knowledge.”

Other SMU faculty involved in the program include:

  • Patty Alvey, Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Cheryl Butler, Dedman School of Law
  • Jay Carson, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business
  • Kimberly Davis, Executive Education, Cox School of Business
  • Ernest Jouriles, Psychology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Sheri Locklear Kunovich, Sociology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • LaiYee Leong, John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Renee McDonald, Psychology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Maria Minniti, Entrepreneurship, Cox School of Business
  • Neena Newberry, Executive Education, Cox School of Business
  • Tony Pederson, Journalism, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Robin Pinkley, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business
  • Mickey Quiñones, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business
  • Dan Schill, Communication Studies, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Francesca Spinelli, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business
  • Carolyn Smith-Morris, Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Paige Ware, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The Women’s Initiative is a major project of the George W. Bush Institute, which since 2010 has conducted several symposia on campus focusing on economic growth, global health, human freedom, and education, including literacy and economic opportunity for the women of Afghanistan. Future Women’s Initiative fellows programs will include women from various areas of the world, with a current concentration on the Middle East.

Above, the George W. Bush Institute has posted a highlight video from the 2012 Women’s Initiative Fellowship Program featuring former First Lady Laura Bush ’68. Click the YouTube screen to watch, or click here to see the Women’s Initiative Fellowship Program video in a new windowvideo

> Visit the George W. Bush Presidential Center online

Condoleezza Rice will be SMU’s 97th Commencement speaker

Condoleezza RiceFormer U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice will deliver the address at SMU’s 97th Commencement ceremony at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 12, 2012, in Moody Coliseum.

SMU expects to award approximately 2,100 undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees in the University-wide ceremony. Rice will receive one of two honorary degrees to be conferred in the ceremony.

Rice has achieved prominence in both government service and higher education. She currently holds three positions at Stanford University: professor of political economy in the Graduate School of Business, Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution, and professor of political science.

“Dr. Rice has led a distinguished career as a scholar, academic administrator and public official,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “As a public official, she served our country during a time of unique challenges. As a teacher-scholar, she is devoted to the education of talented young people. She is well suited to provide compelling and wide-ranging perspectives as SMU’s Commencement speaker.”

Rice earned her Bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Denver, a Master’s from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. from the Graduate School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Her academic career began in 1981 when she joined the Stanford faculty. A dedicated teacher, she has received two of the university’s highest teaching awards. She rose through the faculty ranks to serve as Stanford provost from 1993-99, the first woman and first African American to hold that position.

Rice’s first experience in government service came in 1989, when she left Stanford for Washington to serve for two years on the National Security Council staff under President George H.W. Bush. She was the president’s special assistant for national security affairs during the dissolution of the Soviet Union and reunification of Germany.

After returning to Stanford in 1991, Rice served as provost for six years before again joining public service on the staff of President George W. Bush. She was the president’s national security adviser from 2001-05. She then served from 2005-09 as the nation’s 66th secretary of state, the second woman and the first African American woman to hold the post.

Rice currently serves as chair of the Board of Advisers of the Bush Institute, part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center on the SMU campus.

Philosopher Nancy CartwrightDuring the 2012 Commencement ceremony, SMU will confer an honorary Doctor of Laws degree upon Rice and an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters upon Nancy Cartwright (right), considered one of the most important and influential contemporary philosophers of science. Cartwright, who earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, is a professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics.

The author of seven books, Cartwright has produced path-breaking work on issues such as the nature of physical laws, causation and scientific reasoning. She is a pioneer of today’s practice-based philosophy of science and helped develop the philosophy of social policy, economics, sociology, medicine, epidemiology and political science.

> Read the full story from SMU News
> Visit the Registrar’s Commencement homepage

SMU Libraries honor Laura Bush for contributions to literacy

Laura W. BushFormer First Lady Laura W. Bush will receive SMU’s Literati Award for her contributions to the advancement of literacy. The award will be presented April 2, 2011, at SMU’s Collins Executive Education Center by the Friends of the SMU Libraries.

Mrs. Bush will receive the award at the Friends of the SMU Libraries annual fundraising dinner, Tables of Content. Award-winning journalist Rena Pederson will lead a conversation with Mrs. Bush at the event, which also will feature book signings with ten promising young authors. Kathleen Kent, author of The Hereti’s Daughter and The Wolves of Andover; Jennifer Pickens, author of Christmas at the White House, and 10-year-old Alec Greven, author of How to Talk to Girls and School Rules are among the featured authors.

Mrs. Bush, a 1968 SMU graduate and current member of the University’s Board of Trustees, has championed the importance of literacy and education throughout her life, particularly during her years as a teacher, librarian and as first lady of Texas and of the United States. From advocating for the rights of Afghan women to creating the National Book Festival, she presents a consistent message – the ability to read is life-changing.

Soon after arriving in Washington, D.C., as First Lady, Mrs. Bush launched an early childhood development initiative – Ready to Read, Ready to Learn – which helps parents and caregivers prepare infants and young children for success in reading and school. In 2002 she created the Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries, which has provided more than $7.3 million to school libraries in all 50 states.

Mrs. Bush has served as Honorary Ambassador for the United Nations Literacy Decade since 2003. In 2006 Mrs. Bush hosted the first White House Conference on Global Literacy. Last September she addressed the International Literacy Day Symposium at the United Nations in New York. “Education is our most urgent priority. And it should have the highest call on our time and our priorities,” she said.

Expanding access to education and literacy is a central component of Mrs. Bush’s work as chair of the Women’s Initiative at the George W. Bush Institute. The initiative is designed to enhance women’s access to education, literacy, health and economic opportunities.

Mrs. Bush also has supported writers and readers through the 1995 creation of the Texas Book Festival. She joined with the Library of Congress in 2001 to create the National Book Festival. She also is co-author with her daughter Jenna of a children’s book, Read All About It!

> Learn more from SMU News

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 23, 2011

Mothers matter: Supermodel Christy Turlington Burns took to the other side of the camera in 2010 to make her first film – a documentary about expectant mothers in four very different parts of the world, all in danger of dying from preventable complications during pregnancy or childbirth. The result was “No Woman, No Cry,” which takes viewers from a remote Maasai tribe in Tanzania to a slum in Bangladesh and from a post-abortion care ward in Guatemala to a prenatal clinic in the United States. SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program will host a screening and panel discussion of Turlington’s film beginning at 7 p.m. Feb. 24 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The guest panelists include Jody Keyserling, senior policy analyst with CARE, and Eric Bing, head of global health with the George W. Bush Institute. Admission is free. For more information, visit smu.edu/humanrights. Click the YouTube screen to watch a preview, or visit this link to open the “No Woman, No Cry” trailer in a new window.

Jerry LeVias as an SMU football starBoundary breaker: SMU’s 2011 Black History Month calendar continues with an event that sheds light on the University’s own history in the fight against discrimination. In 1965, Jerry LeVias became the first African American scholarship athlete in the Southwest Conference. The 1969 SMU graduate returns to the Hilltop Feb. 28 for a screening of FOX Sports Southwest‘s award-winning 2003 documentary “Jerry LeVias: A Marked Man,” followed by a town hall forum with LeVias and SMU players and coaches past and present. FS Southwest will host a live webcast of the forum to commemorate the 45th anniversary of LeVias’ boundary-breaking achievement. The screening begins at 7 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center; a 6:30 p.m. reception precedes it. Admission is free.