free screenings

SMU Jewish Studies celebrates Judeo-Spanish Culture Week Jan. 24-31, 2016

Judeo-Spanish Culture Week 2016 flyer

Schedule of events for SMU’s 2016 Judeo-Spanish Culture Week. Click the image for a full-size version.

The Jewish Studies Program in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences celebrates the unique culture of Jews in Spain with a series of events and lectures Jan. 24-31, 2016.

Highlights of Judeo-Spanish Culture Week include:

  • A screening of Flory’s Flame, a documentary about the life and music of 90-year-old Sephardic composer and performer Flory Jagoda, Sunday, Jan. 24. Free.
  • A discussion of “Jewish Treasures of Medieval Spain” with Danielle Joyner, visiting assistant professor of art history, and Shira Lander, director of Jewish studies, Monday, Jan. 25. Free.
  • A lecture on the future of the Judeo-Spanish language Ladino by Bryan Kirschen, assistant professor of Romance languages at Binghamton University and co-writer and co-director of the 2015 film Saved by Language, Thursday, Jan. 28. Free.
  • A concert featuring Trio SefardiHoward Bass, Tina Chancey and Susan Gaeta – who perform with Flory Jagoda using period instruments and specialized vocal techniques in their stories and songs. Tickets are $5 for SMU students, $15 for SMU faculty and staff members, and $25 for the general public; they are available online at smu.edu/triosefardi. Tickets will not be sold at the door.

All events are open to the public. For more information, contact Shira Lander, director of Jewish Studies, 214-768-2157.

Find more information, including a full schedule, at SMU’s Dedman College blog

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2015

Taking action against trafficking: SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program hosts a screening of 8 Days, a 2015 film about child sex trafficking in the United States, on Tuesday, Sept. 15 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Representatives from the FBI, U.S. Department of Homeland Security and SMU’s Dedman School of Law will be on hand to discuss how you can help stop human trafficking. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; the film begins at 7 p.m.

Delta Gamma Lecture flyer - Jerry Greenfield, Ben and Jerry'sSweet social responsibility: Ben & Jerry’s cofounder Jerry Greenfield will speak about the importance of community stewardship at SMU’s 2015 Delta Gamma Lectureship in Values and Ethics. The event, hosted by the University’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and sponsored by the Alpha Upsilon chapter of Delta Gamma, takes place at 7 p.m. Tuesday Sept. 15 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. The lecture is free and open to the public – and yes, there will be free ice cream. Read more from SMU News.

Meadows Jazz Orchestra Brown Bag: Bring your lunch for a brown-bag concert by the Meadows Jazz Orchestra, directed by Dylan Smith, at 12:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. The concert will offer a sneak preview of the MJO’s 2015-16 season, and the ensemble features students from a number of degree programs and majors across Meadows School of the Arts and SMU. Admission is free.

Fra Angelico, 'The Virgin of the Pomegranate' - photo by Nancy GeorgeThe faces of Fra Angelico: Italian Renaissance expert Laurence Kanter, chief durator and Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of European Art with the Yale University Art Gallery, examines the dual – and sometimes conflicting – images of Fra Angelico (ca. 1395-1455) as both a humble and spiritually inspired artist, and as a skillful businessman and a familiar of the powerful and politically connected. “Fra Angelico and the Early Renaissance in Florence” begins at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17 in the Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The lecture is free, and the Museum offers priority seating for members until 5:40 p.m. (Left, Fra Angelico’s The Virgin of the Pomegranate is on display as part of the Meadow Museum’s Treasures from the House of Alba through Jan. 3, 2016. Photo by Nancy George, SMU News.)

'Infanta Margarita in a Blue Dress,' Diego VelasquezThe master and Margarita: Meadows/Kress/Prado Fellow Rebecca Teresi discusses the story behind Diego Velázquez’ series of masterpieces depicting the Infanta Margarita Teresa of Spain in “Velázquez and the Infanta Margarita” at 12:15 p.m. Friday, September 18. The lecture is free, and you’ll also have a chance to view one of these masterworks, Infanta Margarita in a Blue Dress (1659, oil on canvas), on loan from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, through Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015.

60-second songfest: SMU’s Opera Free For All series returns for 2015-16 with its popular season opener, which showcases every member of the Meadows Opera Theatre ensemble in 60-second arias and songs. “Bite-size Arias/Big-size Talents” begins at 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18 in the Bob Hope Theatre Lobby, Owen Arts Center. Admission is free.

SMU celebrates MLK with Dream Week 2015 Jan. 17-22

Martin Luther King Jr.

SMU celebrates the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. during Dream Week 2015.

SMU celebrates the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during Dream Week 2015, Jan. 17-22.

Sponsored by SMU’s Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the annual observance features a variety of activities, including opportunities for community service and a commemorative walk.

The schedule of events:

Saturday, Jan. 17:

  • Dallas Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade, 10 a.m., starting at Dallas City Hall. SMU administrators, faculty and students will participate in the City of Dallas’ parade – including SMU President R. Gerald Turner and alumnus Charles Cox, who as a student introduced King when he spoke at the University on March 17, 1966. (Listen to King’s speech at SMU or read the transcriptaudio) Alumni of SMU’s annual spring break Civil Rights pilgrimage, SMU Black Alumni members, SMU Multicultural Student Affairs representatives and SMU student athletes and coaches also will march in the parade. Find more information at MLKCelebrationDallas.org.

Sunday, Jan. 18:

  • SMU Student Coalition for Equity Meeting, 2 p.m., 243 Umphrey Lee Center. The Student Coalition for Equity is a grassroots social justice movement run by and for students. The group addresses issues of social injustice and seeks to create change from the bottom up.

Monday, Jan. 19:

  • MLK Day of Service, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., volunteer meet-up in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center at assigned times. SMU students, faculty and staff will join others across the country in a national day of service. Opportunities include preparing the Vickery Meadows Learning Center for the spring semester, building ramps at homes of those with physical disabilities and helping with landscaping at local nonprofit centers. Breakfast, lunch and transportation provided. Cosponsored by SMU’s Community Engagement and Leadership Center. Find more information at smu.edu/volunteer.
  • Free screening of “Selma” for SMU students, 7 p.m., Angelika Film Center, Mockingbird Station. SMU students can catch a free showing of this 2014 release, just nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, which explores 1965 Alabama as a battleground in the fight for suffrage for African-Americans. The screening will be followed by free pizza and a discussion with experts on the civil rights movement. Sponsored by Morrison-McGinnis Commons; register at tiny.cc/SelmaMoMac.

Tuesday, Jan. 20:

  • SMU Unity Walk, 12:30-1:30 p.m., starting at Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. President R. Gerald Turner and student leaders lead this annual demonstration of the University’s support for MLK’s work. All members of the SMU community are invited to join the walk from the flagpole on Bishop Boulevard to Perkins Chapel.

Wednesday, Jan. 21:

  • Real Talk: Conversations Around Diversity, noon, Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom West. With a January topic of “Is Your Voice Being Heard? Social media activism: How effective is it?,” this monthly discussion is open to students and other members of the SMU community.
  • Opening reception for Helen Suzman: Fighter for Human Rights, 4-6 p.m., Bob Hope Lobby, Owen Arts Center. This panel exhibition uses letters, speeches, political cartoons and news articles to showcase the career of the South African anti-apartheid and human rights activist. The exhibit runs in the Bob Hope Lobby, Owen Arts Center, through Feb. 20, 2015. Cosponsored by the SMU Arts + Urbanism Initiative and Embrey Human Rights Program. Find more information at the Meadows School of the Arts News and Events homepage.

Thursday, Jan. 22:

  • Film screening, “Mountains That Take Wings: A Conversation with Angela Davis and Yuri Kochiyama”, 6:30 p.m., Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom West. Based on exchanges in 1996 and 2008 between professor and writer Angela Davis and grassroots organizer and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Yuri Kochiyama, the film showcases the scope and depth of their knowledge on topics ranging from Jim Crow laws and Japanese American internment camps, to Civil Rights, anti-war, women’s and gay liberation movements, to today’s campaigns for political prisoners and prison reform. Sponsored by SMU’s Women and LGBT Center.

For more information, contact SMU’s Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, 214-768-4580.

SMU scares up some fun during Halloween Week 2013

Halloween jack-o-lanternIt’s almost Halloween – seek out some scary fun at these campus activities:

• The SMU Center on Communities and Education sponsors a free screening of the 1988 Halloween classic “Beetlejuice” for Scary Movie Night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29 on the Clements Lawn, between Clements Hall and Maguire Hall. The Easy Slider and Kona Ice food trucks will be on hand starting at 6 p.m. with food for purchase. The event supports The School Zone in West Dallas.

• Meanwhile, SMU’s Student Filmmakers’ Association and Program Council team up for Fright Fest starting at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29 on the Late Lawn, between Simmons Hall and the Airline Road garage. The fall-themed fun includes candy, caramel apples, popcorn, pumpkin painting, and an outdoor screening of the cult-favorite horror comedy anthology “Trick ’r Treat” (2007). Bring a blanket and RSVP on Facebook or Twitter.

• SMU Preschool and Child Care holds its annual Halloween Parade on the Boulevard 9:30-11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 31. Wear your friendliest costume and come out to Bishop Boulevard to treat the mini-Mustangs – wrapped candy, boxed raisins, fruit snacks, packaged graham and goldfish crackers, and small trinkets are all welcome.

• Central University Libraries bring sharks, tornados and Tara Reid in a free outdoor showing of 2013’s instant Z-movie camp classic “Sharknado” at 8:30 p.m. Halloween night, Thursday, Oct. 31, on the Laura Bush Promenade at the Fondren Library Center east entrance. The screening is offered by SMU’s Fondren Library Media Collection.

• Meadows Opera Theatre explores the eternal battle between good and evil in its annual Halloween Opera Free For All. This year’s theme, “Singing Saints and Sinners,” features Meadows School of the Arts students performing scenes from Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera and Bizet’s Carmen. The free event begins at 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 in the Bob Hope Theatre Lobby, Owen Arts Center. For more information, call the Meadows Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

Bill Joyce ’81 brings film and family fun to SMU Homecoming 2013

William JoyceBring the kids, or perhaps your inner child, to SMU’s 2013 Homecoming celebration: Author, illustrator and Oscar-winning filmmaker William Joyce ’81 will sign books and screen his 2012 Best Animated Short Film to help kick off the festivities.

Milk and cookies will be served during the screening of “The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore,” taking place 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 in Centennial Hall, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Children and book lovers are welcome, and the event is free and open to the public.

> Register to attend the William Joyce screening at smu.edu/fun

Joyce will also serve as grand marshal of  SMU’s book-themed 2013 Homecoming parade Saturday Oct. 26, celebrating the University’s Year of the Library. This year’s parade begins at 11 a.m. at the intersection of University Boulevard and Hillcrest Avenue, travels south on Hillcrest, then north on Bishop Boulevard into campus.

Joyce’s two latest books are The Mischievians and The Sandman and the War of Dreams. He is also the author of Santa CallsDinosaur Bob and His Adventures With the Family LazardoThe Leaf Men and The Brave Good Bugs and Bently & Egg. In addition, he created the “Rolie Polie Olie” animated children’s TV series, which has earned three Emmy awards.

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris LessmoreNamed by Newsweek as one of the top 100 people to watch in the new millennium, Joyce co-wrote and produced the recent animated film “Epic.” He also created conceptual characters for films such as Toy Story and A Bug’s Life. His second television series, based on his book George Shrinks, aired daily on PBS stations across the country.

In addition, Joyce was the producer and production designer for the critically acclaimed animated feature film “Robots” and the executive producer of the Disney Feature Animation film “Meet the Robinsons,” based on his picture book A Day with Wilbur Robinson.

Joyce will be recognized as an SMU Centennial History Maker at the University’s 2013 Distinguished Alumni Awards ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 24.

SMU hosts series of sustainability events throughout April 2013

Poster art for YERT: Your Environmental Road TripFree campus screenings of two popular environmental documentaries April 4-5 and the return of SMU’s Engineering and Humanity Week April 6-12 are highlights of a month of sustainability-themed events that will underscore the celebration of Earth Day 2013 on Monday, April 22.

Living With the Trinity, showing at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 4 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum, focuses on the political history surrounding management of the Trinity River. The screening will feature an introduction by writer, producer and director Rob Tranchin.

YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip shows at 7 p.m. Friday, April 5, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. The film takes a humorous cross-country look at environmental issues through the eyes of three friends travelling together. Both screenings are sponsored by SMU’s Sustainability Committee and Friends of the SMU Libraries.

The “Barefoot on the Boulevard” sustainability and music festival runs from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 6 on the Bishop Boulevard lawn. Also free and open to the public, “Barefoot” will feature a short talk and concert at 4:30 p.m. by former Sudanese child soldier and hip-hop humanitarian Emmanuel Jal, whose appearance is being made possible by the organizers of Engineering & Humanity Week.

> TIME Magazine: 10 Questions: Emmanuel Jal

Sponsored by Students For a Better Society and the SMU Sustainability Committee, “Barefoot on the Boulevard” will include economically priced food, booths featuring environmental organizations and vendors, and student music acts including the Southern Gentlemen, JSpear, Sean Hadeler, Adam the Bard, Chris Escarfullery, Sudie and Dan Howard.

David de Rothschild

Adventurer and environmentalist David de Rothschild brings the Plastiki, an experimental sailing vessel made of reclaimed bottles, to Dallas for SMU’s 2013 Engineering and Humanity Week.

Engineering & Humanity Week will bring global solution seekers to Dallas and SMU around the theme of “Water: Ripple Effects.” Among the highlights is a visit from the Plastiki – a unique sailing vessel made of reclaimed plastic drink bottles. Engineering & Humanity Week honors its captain, David de Rothschild, with the 2013 Visionary Award at a dinner and reception in Fair Park’s Centennial Hall on Saturday, April 6.

Emmanuel Jal will also be honored at the dinner with the E&H Week Humanitarian Award and will perform his international hit, “We Want Peace,” accompanied by student musicians from SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts. The 6 p.m. dinner is open to the public, and tickets may be purchased at eandhweek2013.eventbrite.com.

> National Geographic Explorers: David de Rothschild, Environmental Storyteller

Most of the program is scheduled for the SMU campus and is free and open to the public – such as the outdoor, interactive water distribution camp that mimics sites in refugee camps. “The Water Tap” (pictured below) on April 9-10 will allow both the SMU community and visitors to learn about and try solutions for problems of water scarcity and sanitation in the developing world. E&H Week is sponsored by Hunter and Stephanie Hunt, SMU’s Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity and the University of Oxford’s Refugee Studies Center.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Learn more from SMU News

SMU’s Dream Week 2013 celebrates MLK Jan. 21-25

Martin Luther King Jr.

SMU celebrates the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. during Dream Week 2013.

SMU celebrates the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during Dream Week 2013, Jan. 21-25.

Sponsored by SMU’s Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the annual observance features a variety of activities, including opportunities for community service and a commemorative walk.

The schedule of events:

Monday, Jan. 21:

  • Day of Service, 7:30 a.m.-noon. Students will have opportunities to volunteer at Readers 2 Leaders, We Over Me Farm and the Wesley-Rankin Community Center. Co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs and Community Engagement and Leadership.

Tuesday, Jan. 22:

  • Real Talk: Conversations Around Diversity, “Dream or Nightmare: How far have we come since the MLK Speech,” noon, Hughes-Trigg Student Center Portico B-C-D.

Wednesday, Jan. 23:

  • Unity Walk featuring remarks from SMU President R. Gerald Turner, noon. Meet at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons.
  • Dream Week Keynote AddressCheryl Brown Henderson, “Brown v. Board of Education: The Legacy Continues,” 6 p.m., Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. Cheryl Brown Henderson, one of the three daughters of the late Rev. Oliver L. Brown, who along with 12 other parents led by the NAACP, filed a lawsuit against the local board of education on behalf of their children in the historic school integration case Oliver L. Brown et. al. vs. the Board of Education of Topeka. The 1954 Supreme Court decision stated that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”

Thursday, Jan. 24:

  • Film ScreeningBrother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin, 7 p.m., Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. Sponsored by SMU’s Women’s Center for Gender and Pride Initiatives.
  • Friday, Jan. 25 – Unity Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. Featured speaker for the luncheon will be Dedman College Dean William Tsutsui, who will speak on “Chasing the Asian American Dream.” Co-sponsored by the SMU Asian Council, Association of Black Students, and College of Hispanic American Students.


SMU Libraries welcome Halloween 2012 with a ‘Night’ to remember

'Night of the Living Dead' 1968 logoSMU’s Central University Libraries break open the vaults to present a horror classic on Halloween night, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Legendary director George Romero’s first feature film, the original Night of the Living Dead, haunts the quad in a free outdoor screening beginning at 8:30 p.m. on the Laura Bush Promenade, Fondren Library Center.

First released on Oct. 1, 1968, and completed on a budget of $114,000, Night of the Living Dead went on to gross $12 million in the United States and $18 million internationally (as well as gross out viewers everywhere). The film soon became the most profitable independent horror feature ever made.

It also grew from its humble roots to be selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry as a motion picture deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.” And in 2001, the American Film Institute ranked Night #93 on its “100 Years…100 Thrills” list as one of the most heart-pounding American movies in cinema history.

CUL encourages arriving in costume — the three best will win prizes.

> Visit SMU’s Central University Libraries online
> Learn how to check out movies from Fondren Library Center

Conference to explore human rights issues in Africa April 11-15

African Literature Association logoThe African Literature Association will meet April 11-15, 2012, at SMU and Dallas’s Adolphus Hotel to explore human rights issues in Africa.

The association’s 38th annual meeting will feature 10 writers, journalists and performers from various countries in Africa and is expected to draw more than 400 participants from all over the world, including Japan, Australia, Great Britain, France, Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States and various African countries.

Participants will explore the theme of human rights in current African art, literature and the visual arts, as well as in the areas of health and political freedom.

Campus events, which are free and open to the public, include the following:

  • A special screening of the film Quartier Mozart will take place at 7 p.m. Friday, April 13, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. Based on African folklore, it tells the story of a mischievous young girl who wants to know what it’s like to be a boy and has her wish granted by a witch. The film was shown at Cannes, and went on to critical acclaim, winning awards at FESPACO, the Montréal Film Festival, and the Locarno Film Festival, and receiving a nomination for a British Film and Television Award. Jean-Pierre Bekolo, the film’s director, will be on hand to answer questions.
  • Ghanaian playwright Ama Ata AidooThe 70th birthday of award-winning Ghanaian writer and playwright Ama Ata Aidoo (pictured right) will be celebrated with a staged reading from her two plays at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 14, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. The readings are being organized in cooperation with the SMU Theatre program and adapted by Professor Gretchen Smith, head of theatre studies in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.The readings will be followed by the launching of her newest book of short stories, Diplomatic Pounds and Other Stories, as well as the launch of a festschrift in her honor, Essays in Honour of Ama Ata Aidoo at 70. Works by Aidoo, former Education Minister of Ghana, often depict the role of the African woman in modern society. Her acclaimed prose works include No Sweetness Here (1970), a collection of short stories; the semi-autobiographical novel Our Sister Killjoy (1979); and Changes: A Love Story (1991), which won the 1993 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Africa region. Aidoo has noted that the idea of nationalism has been used by new leaders as a tool to keep people oppressed, according to her biography. One of the most respected and prolific writers from the African continent, her central issues are the legacy of the slave trade, the impact of neo-colonialism on the educated Ghanaian elite, and the notion of exile and African diasporic identity.

Participating SMU faculty members and conference supporters include Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, the Department of World Languages and LiteraturesDepartment of English, the Embrey Human Rights Program, the Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series, and the Honors Program.

> Find more information, including a detailed schedule, at the Dedman College website

 

Series explores ‘the concept of home’ with El Norte screening April 4

A film poster from Gregory Nava's 'El Norte'SMU’s 2012 “Migration Matters” series continues Wednesday, April 4, with a film classic that raises important issues concerning U.S. immigration. A screening of El Norte, featuring commentary by SMU Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Caroline Brettell, is scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. in SMU’s McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

The Academy Award-nominated 1983 documentary, directed by Gregory Nava, focuses on two Guatemala Mayan peasants, a brother and sister, who flee their country because of political persecution and head north (el norte). The film traces their journey, border-crossing experiences and subsequent life in the U.S. as undocumented immigrants.

“It raises poignant questions about the concept of home and touches on a host of issues important to understanding U.S. immigration,” Brettell says.

For more information about this event or others in the series, contact “Migration Matters” coordinator Jayson Sae-Saue, Department of English, Dedman College, 214-768-4369.

Shirin Tavakoli contributed to this report.

> Find the full “Migration Matters” schedule at the SMU News website

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