Pamela Patton wins 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award

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Pamela Patton wins 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award

Pamela Patton, Chair, Division of Art History, SMU Meadows School of the ArtsPamela Patton, associate professor and chair of art history SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has won the 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award from the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies. Her 2013 book, Art of Estrangement: Redefining Jews in Reconquest Spain, was the unanimous choice for the national honor.

The Tufts Award was established in memory of noted Spanish art expert Eleanor Tufts, who taught at SMU from 1974 until her passing in 1991. The award honors a distinguished book, written in English, on the history of art or architecture in Iberia.

Book cover, 'Art of Estrangement: Redefining Jews in Reconquest Spain' by Pamela PattonThe judging committee wrote, “Patton’s engaging text examines the varied meanings of representations of Jews in the visual culture of the Reconquista. Original in its conception and compelling in its arguments, this book traces the ways in which the image of Spain’s Jews as ‘the other’ was transfigured by the cultural, political and religious agendas of its Christian rulers.… This publication met and surpassed the stipulated award criteria of ‘originality of conception, thoroughness of research, rigor of argument, brilliance of insight, significance of findings, and clarity of expression.’

“In sum, the book’s broad scope of inquiry and sophisticated interdisciplinary approach that draws on history, religion, and cultural studies make a significant and original contribution to the study of medieval Spanish art and Iberian studies as a whole. Its lucid and elegant prose made it a pleasure to read.”

Patton said she was greatly honored by the award, especially because she has a personal connection to Eleanor Tufts. “Just before she passed away, she was part of the committee that brought me to SMU as a Haakon Pre-Doctoral Fellow,” said Patton. “When I was subsequently hired as faculty, I took on several of her courses. So it’s a lovely bit of karma for me.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

March 7, 2014|For the Record, News, Year of the Faculty|

Meadows dean receives national award from Association of American Colleges and Universities

Jose Antonio Bowen, dean, Meadows School of the Arts at SMUThe Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) has announced that José Antonio Bowen, dean of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, is the winner of the national 2014 Frederic W. Ness Book Award for Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning, published in 2012 by Jossey-Bass.

The Ness Award is given to a book that best illuminates the goals and practices of a contemporary liberal education. The award was  presented to Bowen at AAC&U’s annual meeting last week in Washington, D.C.

In Teaching Naked, Bowen explores how technology can be most powerfully used outside the classroom rather than as a substitute for traditional classroom learning. Among other things, Bowen discusses particular approaches to using technology to improve learning outcomes and ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty.

Book cover of 'Teaching Naked' by Jose Antonio BowenThis year’s Ness Award winner was selected by a committee of higher education leaders including Dianne Harrison (chair), president, California State University-Northridge; Jim Collins, Virginia M. Ullman Professor of Natural History and Environment, Arizona State University; and Marc Roy, provost, Goucher College.

“José Bowen’s work is both compelling and useful,” said Dianne Harrison, “and it also is very cognizant of the ideals and values of liberal education.”

The Ness Book Award was established by AAC&U in 1979 to honor AAC&U’s president emeritus, Frederic W. Ness. Recent winners include Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession by Dr. Anne Colby, Thomas Ehrlich, Dr. William Sullivan, and Dr. Jonathan R. Dolle; Why Choose the Liberal Arts? by Mark W. Roche; Tearing Down the Gates: Confronting the Class Divide in American Education by Peter Sacks; Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More by Derek Bok; Saving Higher Education in the Age of Money by James Engell and Anthony Dangerfield; Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi; Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past by Sam Wineburg; and Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education by Martha Nussbaum.

> Visit José Bowen’s website, TeachingNaked.com

January 28, 2014|For the Record, News|

Help create SMU’s 2013 holiday book list

'Sweet On Texas' bookcover

“Sweet On Texas” by SMU staff member Denise Gee was part of the University’s 2012 holiday book list. The Office of News and Communications has created a new online entry form for 2013 submissions.

Attention all authors: The SMU Office of News and Communications wants your book news. And for 2013, it’s easier than ever to send it in.

Faculty and staff authors are asked to submit information on their general-interest books – no text books, please – published in 2013 or scheduled to be published before the year’s end. All entries will be considered for SMU’s holiday gift-giving book list, posted annually to the University home page.

This year, SMU News and Communications has created an easy-to-use template for authors to provide all necessary information about their latest books. Please use the template at smu.edu/News/Books and send a cover image from your book to smunews@smu.edu. The deadline is Friday, Nov. 15, 2013.

November 13, 2013|News, Save the Date|

Tune In: SMU’s Andrew Graybill on KERA’s ‘Think’ Nov. 7, 2013

Andrew R. GraybillAndrew Graybill, associate professor of history and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss changing notions of racial identity in the West on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Graybill will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Tune in at kera.org/listen

Graybill’s new book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), follows the story of Montana fur trader Malcolm Clarke and his Piegan Blackfeet wife, Coth-co-co-na, focusing on the 1870 Marias Massacre – set in motion by the murder of Malcolm Clarke and in which Clarke’s two sons rode with the Second U.S. Cavalry to kill their own blood relatives.

In his examination of this historical tragedy, Graybill sheds light on how racial attitudes changed from the 19th century, in which Native-white marriages proliferated, to the 20th, in which such families often encountered virulent prejudice.

Visit SMU’s Clements Center online at smu.edu/swcenter

November 7, 2013|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News, Tune In|

Tune In: The constitutional conundrum of the No Fly List

Most people are familiar with the No Fly List, part of the Secure Flight program run by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). What most don’t realize, however, is how similar that list is to a system used more than 50 years ago – one ultimately deemed unconstitutional.

Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists (University of Michigan Press) combines history, policy analysis and the law, beginning with an introduction to the No Fly List’s intellectual ancestor: Ruth B. Shipley. Her grandmotherly appearance belied the immense power she wielded as chief of the U.S. State Department Passport Office from 1928 to 1955, when she almost single-handedly decided which Americans could travel outside the country and which would be kept at home.

Author Jeffrey Kahn (pictured left), an associate professor in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, writes that “Mrs. Shipley’s ghost” now permeates a massive computerized system that diffuses her authority across multiple agencies – but still denies due process and infringes on citizens’ constitutionally protected rights. He discusses his book with KERA Radio in an interview scheduled to air from 1-2 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, 2013. Listen on your radio at 90.1 FM, or click here to listen on your computer or other electronic device.

> Read more about Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost from SMU News

June 4, 2013|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News, Tune In|
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