faculty books

Meadows dean receives national award from Association of American Colleges and Universities

Jose Antonio Bowen, dean, Meadows School of the Arts at SMUThe Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) has announced that José Antonio Bowen, dean of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, is the winner of the national 2014 Frederic W. Ness Book Award for Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning, published in 2012 by Jossey-Bass.

The Ness Award is given to a book that best illuminates the goals and practices of a contemporary liberal education. The award was  presented to Bowen at AAC&U’s annual meeting last week in Washington, D.C.

In Teaching Naked, Bowen explores how technology can be most powerfully used outside the classroom rather than as a substitute for traditional classroom learning. Among other things, Bowen discusses particular approaches to using technology to improve learning outcomes and ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty.

Book cover of 'Teaching Naked' by Jose Antonio BowenThis year’s Ness Award winner was selected by a committee of higher education leaders including Dianne Harrison (chair), president, California State University-Northridge; Jim Collins, Virginia M. Ullman Professor of Natural History and Environment, Arizona State University; and Marc Roy, provost, Goucher College.

“José Bowen’s work is both compelling and useful,” said Dianne Harrison, “and it also is very cognizant of the ideals and values of liberal education.”

The Ness Book Award was established by AAC&U in 1979 to honor AAC&U’s president emeritus, Frederic W. Ness. Recent winners include Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession by Dr. Anne Colby, Thomas Ehrlich, Dr. William Sullivan, and Dr. Jonathan R. Dolle; Why Choose the Liberal Arts? by Mark W. Roche; Tearing Down the Gates: Confronting the Class Divide in American Education by Peter Sacks; Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More by Derek Bok; Saving Higher Education in the Age of Money by James Engell and Anthony Dangerfield; Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi; Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past by Sam Wineburg; and Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education by Martha Nussbaum.

> Visit José Bowen’s website, TeachingNaked.com

Help create SMU’s 2013 holiday book list

'Sweet On Texas' bookcover

“Sweet On Texas” by SMU staff member Denise Gee was part of the University’s 2012 holiday book list. The Office of News and Communications has created a new online entry form for 2013 submissions.

Attention all authors: The SMU Office of News and Communications wants your book news. And for 2013, it’s easier than ever to send it in.

Faculty and staff authors are asked to submit information on their general-interest books – no text books, please – published in 2013 or scheduled to be published before the year’s end. All entries will be considered for SMU’s holiday gift-giving book list, posted annually to the University home page.

This year, SMU News and Communications has created an easy-to-use template for authors to provide all necessary information about their latest books. Please use the template at smu.edu/News/Books and send a cover image from your book to smunews@smu.edu. The deadline is Friday, Nov. 15, 2013.

By | 2013-12-11T10:40:54+00:00 November 13, 2013|Categories: News, Save the Date|Tags: , , , , , |

Tune In: SMU’s Andrew Graybill on KERA’s ‘Think’ Nov. 7, 2013

Andrew R. GraybillAndrew Graybill, associate professor of history and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss changing notions of racial identity in the West on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Graybill will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Tune in at kera.org/listen

Graybill’s new book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), follows the story of Montana fur trader Malcolm Clarke and his Piegan Blackfeet wife, Coth-co-co-na, focusing on the 1870 Marias Massacre – set in motion by the murder of Malcolm Clarke and in which Clarke’s two sons rode with the Second U.S. Cavalry to kill their own blood relatives.

In his examination of this historical tragedy, Graybill sheds light on how racial attitudes changed from the 19th century, in which Native-white marriages proliferated, to the 20th, in which such families often encountered virulent prejudice.

Visit SMU’s Clements Center online at smu.edu/swcenter

Tune In: The constitutional conundrum of the No Fly List

Most people are familiar with the No Fly List, part of the Secure Flight program run by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). What most don’t realize, however, is how similar that list is to a system used more than 50 years ago – one ultimately deemed unconstitutional.

Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists (University of Michigan Press) combines history, policy analysis and the law, beginning with an introduction to the No Fly List’s intellectual ancestor: Ruth B. Shipley. Her grandmotherly appearance belied the immense power she wielded as chief of the U.S. State Department Passport Office from 1928 to 1955, when she almost single-handedly decided which Americans could travel outside the country and which would be kept at home.

Author Jeffrey Kahn (pictured left), an associate professor in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, writes that “Mrs. Shipley’s ghost” now permeates a massive computerized system that diffuses her authority across multiple agencies – but still denies due process and infringes on citizens’ constitutionally protected rights. He discusses his book with KERA Radio in an interview scheduled to air from 1-2 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, 2013. Listen on your radio at 90.1 FM, or click here to listen on your computer or other electronic device.

> Read more about Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost from SMU News

Research: How hiding in plain sight saved the Jicarilla Apache

Book cover of 'Becoming White Clay' by B. Sunday EiseltNorth America’s Jicarilla Apache tribe cloaked themselves in trade, diplomacy, and intermarriage and nearly escaped incarceration on an American Indian reservation. How they did it has been a mystery of the historical American Southwest – until now.

“In some ways, the Jicarilla still remain invisible,” according to SMU anthropologist Sunday Eiselt.

The Jicarilla Apache, an amalgamation of nomadic tribes that in the 18th century migrated off the plains and settled in the northern Rio Grande of New Mexico, were accustomed to armed resistance, guerrilla tactics and inter-tribal warfare.

They fought alongside the Pueblo Indians in the Revolt of 1680 and later resisted Comanche raiders, sometimes as contract fighters and security guards for the Spanish and American trade caravans. Then quietly, deliberately and peacefully they slipped off the radar of Spanish colonization and U.S. Manifest Destiny until 1888, when the Jicarilla became the last Native American tribe forcibly settled on a reservation.

“This was not an accident of history,” says Eiselt. The Apache, particularly the Jicarilla, were experts at invisibility — not just physically, but also socially and economically. For example, Jicarilla warriors on raids would paint themselves during the journey to the plains with white clay to avoid detection by their enemies.

The protocol beckoned supernatural or spiritual protections to bring the warriors home safely. Just as white clay was a warrior strategy for self-preservation, it stands as a metaphor for the primary message of the book.

“By ‘becoming white clay’ in their social and economic dealings,” Eiselt contends, “the Jicarilla turned the tables on non-Indian expansion and disappeared into the cultural fabric of the Southwest’s Pueblo colonies as other Native Americans were being forced onto reservations.” The Jicarilla, without firing a shot, not only avoided confinement and even extermination for nearly two centuries, they rescued their culture from extinction.

“The Jicarilla essentially colonized the colonies,” says Eiselt, an expert on the Jicarilla. “They became invisible to government authorities because they were always on the move, they intermarried with the Pueblo and Hispanic peoples, and they established long-standing trade with them. They disappeared by becoming essential, an everyday part of the frontier society of New Mexico, which sustained Spanish, Mexican and ultimately U.S. interests.”

Encapsulation of one society within a larger, dominant or more powerful society is a phenomenon known as enclavement. As a strategy it was not new to the ancestors of the Jicarilla. In fact, enclavement may have occurred multiple times as their Athapaskan ancestors migrated from Canada to the American Southwest beginning as early as the 12th century, Eiselt says.

“Few scholars recognize how significant the Jicarilla contribution was to the survival of the traditional cultures of New Mexico,” says Eiselt, whose new book “Becoming White Clay” (University of Utah Press, 2012) is a comprehensive study of one of the longest-lived and most successful nomadic ethnic group enclaves in North America. “There hasn’t been a whole lot of research into the Jicarilla, even though they’ve always been there and their contribution to New Mexican history is almost entirely underappreciated.”

“Sunday Eiselt has produced the definitive work on Jicarilla Apache history and archaeology,” says Ronald H. Towner, University of Arizona. “She uses a strong theoretical approach to enclavement and combines history, archaeology and ethnohistory to not only describe past Jicarilla movements and cultural development throughout the Southwest, but to explain how and why Jicarilla social organization at different scales structured that development during times of warfare, removal from traditional lands and economic stress. Eiselt’s scholarship is second-to-none.”

Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

Tune In: Jeffrey Engel discusses the Gulf War on C-SPAN2 Feb. 9-10

Book cover for 'Into the Desert,' edited by Jeffrey EngelJeffrey Engel, director of SMU’s Center for Presidential History in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, visited Texas A&M University to talk about his latest book, Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War. Now C-SPAN2 will air Engel’s discussion at 11:30 p.m. CT Saturday, Feb. 9 and 4 p.m. CT Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013 as part of its Book TV series.

Engel edited the collection of essays by journalists, government officials and scholars that looks back on the events and impact of the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War. The book was published by Oxford University Press in December 2012.

> Add these showtimes to your Outlook or iCal calendar

Good reading, good giving: SMU books for 2012

From art, history and religion to sweet Texas cuisine and fiction, SMU’s 2012 book roundup offers a wide selection to satisfy the readers in your life. Treat yourself or those on your gift list to one of the current titles listed below the link.

(more…)

Research: A new look at the Native American movement

'Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power' book coverWhen several hundred Native Americans took over the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C., on November 3, 1972, it was with the backing of a hodgepodge of supporters ranging  from hippies to Methodists to Hollywood celebrities.

SMU History Professor Sherry Smith’s new book, Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power  (Oxford University Press, 2012), is the first to examine this alliance that cut across racial, ethnic and class lines.

“I felt this story had not been told,” says Smith, who devoted 10 years to writing the book. “The primary figures in the Red Power movement  – the most important movers and shakers – were Native Americans. But the support they received from non-Indians was a critical, even essential, component in their ultimate successes.”

Hippies looked to Native Americans as symbols of alternative ways of life that were opposite of established society’s values and beliefs, but the hippie-Indian interaction was more textured and complicated than that, Smith says.

“Hippies were among the first non-Indians of the postwar generation to seek out contact with Native Americans, learn about their grievances, and join their call for reform,” she says. “They did so in large and significant numbers, which in turn caught the attention of the rest of the nation.”

To tell the story, Smith interviewed non-Indians involved in the alliance such as Stewart Brand, creator of the Whole Earth Catalog; actor and counterculture activist Peter Coyote, as well as Native Americans such as Joe Sando of the Albuquerque Pueblo Cultural Center. She also relied on sources ranging from the Richard Nixon Presidential Papers to the American Friends Service Committee.

Smith links the interest in Indian affairs in the 1960s and ’70s to cultural events such as the 1962 publication of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, which featured one of the first prominent fictional contemporary Indian characters, Chief Broom. In addition, Dee Brown’s 1970 bestseller, Bury My Heart at Wounded Kneeopened readers’ eyes to the root of Native American demands with the first history of the American West told from the Indians’ point of view.

As the 40th anniversary of events such as the Trail of Broken Treaties (Nov. 3-9, 1972) and the occupation of Wounded Knee (Feb. 27-May 8, 1973) approaches, Smith’s book examines a period when Americans supported social justice movements that did not serve their personal interests.

“I was very impressed with those individuals and groups, including the church-based organizations, that rose to the occasion and helped push for substantive reform in Indian policy in the 1970s,” Smith says. “This was not about them, but about others. They had nothing to gain personally, other than a sense that the nation was finally living up to its promises.”

Can it happen again?

“We have become increasingly fragmented in this country,” Smith says. “I think our nation has been in a reactive state for 40 years now, turning away from the turmoil and challenges of the Sixties. But I am heartened by the resurgence of activism. It is certainly possible and even probable that social and economic justice movements will be revitalized.”

> Read more from SMU News

Research: A field-changing view of divine kingship in Islam

'The Millennial Sovereign' by Azfar Moin, book coverIn a new and potentially field-changing study, SMU historian Azfar Moin explores why Muslim sovereigns in the early modern era began to imitate the exalted nature of Sufi saints.

Uncovering a startling but widespread phenomenon, Moin shows how the charismatic pull of sainthood (wilayat) — rather than the draw of religious law (sharia) or holy war (jihad) —inspired a new style of sovereignty in Islam. Moin’s research is published in his new book, The Millennial Sovereign (Columbia University Press, 2012).

At the end of the 16th century and the turn of the first Islamic millennium, the powerful Mughal emperor Akbar declared himself the most sacred being on earth. The holiest of all saints and above the distinctions of religion, he styled himself as the messiah reborn. Yet the Mughal emperor was not alone in doing so.

The title of the book reflects the Mughal emperors’ messianic and Sufi beliefs, which also led these Muslim rulers to explore European Christianity, says Moin, an expert on the history of South Asia who teaches in the Clements Department of History of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

“The Mughal emperors of 16th- and 17th-century India — of Taj Mahal fame — were also avid collectors of Christian art. They even invited Jesuit missionaries to discuss the Bible. At first the Catholic priests were delighted that such powerful Muslim kings were attracted to Christianity, but they eventually realized that their hosts were more interested in the millennium,” Moin says.

“The first millennium of Islam occurred at the end of the 16th century,” he says. “The Mughals used this religiously charged moment to style themselves as saintly and messianic sovereigns. They called their queens ‘The Mary of the Age’ and ‘Of the Stature of Mary.’ This didn’t mean that they had turned Christian, but that they were Jesus-like in their sacredness.”

“This is a brilliant book,” said South Asia expert Francis Robinson, a professor at Royal Holloway, University of London. “It is the most innovative contribution to our understanding of Mughal history of my time. As a work of the first importance, and a step change in our knowledge of 16th-century India, it must be read by anyone interested in the fields of Islamic kingship, millenarianism and astrology in the Muslim world, and in the early modern world in general.”— Columbia University Press

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

For the Record: May 2012

The SMU Office of Public Affairs received 10 awards in 8 different categories in the 2012 Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District IV competition. Nicole SantosMelinda Matthews, Laura Graham, Karen Shoholm and Vicki Olvera, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, won a Gold Award in the Design category for “Say Hello to SMU,” the University’s new admission brochure. Sarah Hanan and Kathleen Tibbetts, News and Communications, won the Gold and Silver Awards in the Blogs category for SMU Adventures and SMU ForumHillsman S. Jackson, Laura GrahamPatti LaSalle, Mitch WhittenSherry MyresKaren Shoholm and Nancy George received the Silver Award in the Institutional Relations category for the University’s Centennial picture book, SMU: Unbridled Vision (pictured).

Pat Ward, Public Affairs/Periodicals, brought home the Silver Award in the Newsletters category for the Central University Libraries newsletter, Annotations. Brooke Carlock, Karen Shoholm, Melinda Matthews and Vicki Olvera, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, won the Bronze Award in the Design – Special Pieces category for the President’s Associates calendar and Academic Programs booklet. Brittney Wallace, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, earned a Bronze Award for Design Improvement for the President’s Scholars recruitment brochure.

The Development and External Affairs team won a Bronze Award for Institutional Relations for The Second Century Celebration. Denise Gee, News and Communications, won a Bronze Award in the Writing Collection category for her portfolio focused on the University’s human rights programs. Eva Parks, News and Communications, received an Honorable Mention in the Electronic Communications category for the Fall 2011 “SMU in the News” video.

Irina Dumitrescu, English, Dedman College, has received a 24-month Humboldt Research Fellowship to begin August 1, 2012. The award allows postdoctoral researchers who have completed their doctorates within the past four years to carry out a long-term research project (6 to 24 months) in cooperation with an academic host of their choosing at a research institution in Germany. Dumitrescu’s host institution is the Free University of Berlin, where she will work with Andrew James Johnston in the Institute for English Language and Literature. Her Humboldt-funded project, “The Drama of Grammar: Second-Language Learning in Early England,” will examine the ways in which vivid, surprising, and often scandalous grammar texts used to teach Latin and French during the Middle Ages shaped the emotional lives of students and taught them innovative ways to engage with literature.

Jennifer Dworak, Computer Science and Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, has received a Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Consortium. The awards provide seed money for research by junior faculty at ORAU member institutions to enrich their research and professional growth.

'Revelations in Business' book cover

Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College, gave an invited talk on “Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road” at Stanford University’s Center for East Asian Studies April 26, 2012. The lecture was sponsored by the Silk Road Foundation and the Stanford Humanities Center, Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, Ho Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for East Asian Studies, Department of Religious Studies, and Department of History.

K. Shelette Stewart, Executive Education, Cox School of Business, has written Revelations in Business: Connecting Your Business Plan with God’s Purpose and Plan for Your Life (pictured), published by Tate Publishing. She is also the narrator of the audio edition, currently available at Amazon.com

Load More Posts