endowed chairs

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

$1.5 million gift to fund new endowed chair in Art History

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

A $1.5 million gift from the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education will establish an endowed chair in the Division of Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

“We are deeply grateful to the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for its generosity and visionary support,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This gift will enable Meadows School of the Arts to add further strength to the faculty and academic offerings in one of the school’s leading departments. The gift supports a major goal of SMU’s Second Century Campaign to endow 100 faculty positions and brings the current total to 86.”

> The Dallas Morning News: Robert Miller: SMU’s Meadows School of Arts receives $1.5 million boost

The Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education is a private charitable foundation supported through contributions from Marsha and John B. Kleinheinz of Fort Worth. Their daughter, Marguerite, graduated from Meadows School of the Arts in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in art history.

“We are very impressed with Marguerite’s experience at the Meadows School and SMU. Meadows Dean José Bowen has made great progress during his tenure,” said Marsha Kleinheinz, president of the Kleinheinz Family Endowment. “We want to support the future of the University that is so important to our family.”

John Kleinheinz, a Stanford University graduate, started his career as an investment banker engaged in corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions for Nomura Securities and Merrill Lynch in Tokyo, New York and London. In 1996 he established Kleinheinz Capital Partners, Inc., a private investment management firm in Fort Worth.

Marsha Kleinheinz earned a B.B.A. degree from SMU in 1983. She is currently involved in several charitable organizations, including Gill Children’s Services, The Warm Place, The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Van Cliburn Foundation, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, Performing Arts of Fort Worth and North Texas Public Broadcasting. The Kleinheinzes have three children.

“Our art history faculty are doing remarkable new things that will change the way art is studied,” said Dean Bowen. “With this exceptionally generous gift, we will be able to recruit and retain outstanding professors and continue to enhance our reputation as one of the very best art history departments in the country.”

SMU Provost Paul Ludden added, “The Kleinheinz Family Endowed Chair in Art History will help to ensure the continued development of the Art History Division as one of SMU’s strongest academic units. It will enhance the entire University as a center of excellence for historical studies.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

Women’s health advocate Sandra Fluke to speak at SMU Sept. 24

Women's health advocate Sandra FlukeWomen’s health advocate Sandra Fluke — the Georgetown University law student Rush Limbaugh verbally attacked earlier this year for supporting contraception coverage in the Affordable Care Act — will be at SMU Monday, Sept. 24, 2012 to discuss “Economics and Equality: How Obstacles to Women’s Health Care Access Affect Us All.”

Fluke’s appearance is set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater and is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by SMU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program with support from Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Embrey Human Rights Program and the Office of the Provost.

On the heels of her speech at the Democratic National Convention Sept. 5, and her March testimony before a Democratic steering committee, “Sandra Fluke is emerging as one of our most outspoken advocates for reproductive rights and women’s health issues,” says Beth Newman, director of SMU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program and associate professor of English.

“Our goal is not to stage a debate between adversaries who hurl worn-out sound bites at one another. We want to offer students and the community an informed discussion about the relationship between reproductive rights and women’s health and how the conversation plays out in the media.”

Joining Fluke for the panel discussion will be:

  • Charles E. Curran, SMU’s Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, “who can provide insight, as a moral theologian and loyal dissenter within the Catholic Church, into some of the issues Fluke raised in her testimony last March,” Newman says.
  • SMU Associate Provost and Dedman School of Law Professor Linda Eads, who can add legal expertise to the discussion.
  • Ken Lambrecht, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of North Texas, “who can speak about how the Texas legislature’s recent defunding of all Planned Parenthood clinics is affecting women’s health,” Newman says.
  • Event moderator Karen Thomas, professor of practice in Meadows School of the Arts. The award-winning journalist has 25 years’ experience covering the news as well as health and family issues.

For more information, contact the SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read more from SMU News

SMU graduates honor Jeremy Adams with endowed professorship

SMU History Professor Jeremy Adams

Jeremy duQuesnay Adams

Two SMU graduates are showing appreciation for a professor who made a lasting impact on their lives by establishing an endowed professorship in his honor.

The $1.25 million gift from Stephen L. and Kathryn Hedges Arata of Dallas will create the Jeremy duQuesnay Adams Centennial Professorship in Western European Medieval History in honor of the longtime SMU professor, who will continue to teach in the University’s Clements Department of History.

“We are honored to have an endowed professorship bearing the name of one of SMU’s most distinguished and revered faculty members,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are grateful to the Aratas for their vision and generosity in providing this gift, which supports our Second Century Campaign goal to increase the number of endowed chairs to 100. With the Adams Professorship, the University is within 15 faculty positions of reaching that goal.”

Several other former students of Professor Adams have contributed toward the endowed professorship in his honor. Those contributing $25,000 and more include Cindy and Dr. David Stager Jr. ’87; Jo ’90 and Joe Goyne; and Renee Justice Standley ’90 and Kenneth Standley.

Both the Aratas majored in English and minored in medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College. Kathryn earned her B.A. degree in 1987 and an M.A. in English from SMU in 1991. Stephen received two degrees from SMU in 1988 — a B.A. from Dedman College and B.B.A. from Cox School of Business. He also earned a Master’s of Management degree from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Kathryn Arata said, “My parents, the Rev. Bill B. Hedges and Jane Hedges, graduated from SMU in 1960. All of my life I have loved this university, growing up steeped in the SMU culture and history. When I finally arrived on the campus, I was captivated by the quality and variety of the courses offered.

“Jeremy Adams created a sense of academic curiosity and desire for learning that I possess to this day. Now that Stephen and I are in a position to pay back (actually pay forward) the gifts he gave us, we wanted to do something that would be close to Jeremy’s heart. He is passionate about his subject, and we have given this endowment to ensure that his passion will continue to light the fires of academic curiosity in students for years to come.”

The Adams Professorship is the first Centennial Professorship to be established in Dedman College. The “Centennial” designation is a special gift category during SMU’s 100th anniversary commemoration, 2011-15. It requires that gifts meet elevated giving levels and provide a combination of endowment and annual support. Because a faculty position designated as “Centennial” enables the appointment to be made sooner, SMU has initiated a search to fill the Adams Professorship in the 2013-14 academic year.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Christensen to serve as interim Engineering Dean as of July 1, 2012

Marc ChristensenMarc Christensen has agreed to serve as dean ad interim of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering effective July 1, 2012. He will serve an initial appointment that ends in August 2013.

Christensen is the school’s Bobby B. Lyle Professor in Engineering Innovation and chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering. He also holds an appointment as a research associate professor in the Department of Physics in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He began his SMU career in 2002.

In addition, Christensen serves as faculty representative to SMU’s Second Century Campaign.

“In my discussions with faculty, staff and students of the Lyle School, Marc received great support for this new role,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “I’m sure that you will join me in working with Marc to ensure the continued success of the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.”

>  Visit the Lyle School of Engineering online

Major General, Civil & Environmental Engineering chair leaving SMU

Jeffrey W. Talley will join innovative technologies company and Johns Hopkins

Maj. Gen. Jeffrey W. TalleyAcclaimed general and engineering professor Jeffrey W. Talley will leave SMU Aug. 31, 2011 to begin new duties as President and CEO of Environmental Technologies Solutions (ETS). ETS is an engineering, research and services limited liability company (LLC) that develops and commercializes innovative technologies to benefit society and the environment. ETS consists of a combination of subsidiary companies and joint ventures around the globe, predominantly organized around new technical products and associated services.

At SMU, Talley is Professor and Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Bobby B. Lyle Professor of Leadership and Global Entrepreneurship and the Founding Director of the Hunter and Stephanie Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity.

“Jeffrey Talley is an engineer who has made important contributions to our country, particularly as an Army officer in Iraq working to provide the infrastructure needed for peace and hope,” said Geoffrey Orsak, dean of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering. “We thank him for his service to SMU and wish him well as he takes this wonderful opportunity to lead ETS in areas of great importance.”

Prior to his appointment at SMU, Talley was on faculty at the University of Notre Dame. He has more than 29 years in various academic, design, consulting and military positions involving hundreds of different environmental sites and business projects throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Talley will continue his academic activities as an Adjunct Professor at The Johns Hopkins University. At Johns Hopkins, Talley will teach and conduct research in environmental engineering, engineering for sustainability development and entrepreneurship associated with technology. He also will continue his global work integrating engineering and business as part of social entrepreneurship in disadvantaged communities. Talley will retain his duties as a Major General in the Army Reserve as Commanding General, 84th Training Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Talley received his Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. He also holds multiple master’s degrees in environmental engineering and science, strategic studies, liberal arts (history and philosophy) and religious studies. He currently is completing his Executive M.B.A. at the University of Oxford. Talley is a registered professional engineer (P.E.) in environmental engineering, a board certified environmental engineer (BCEE) in environmental sustainability and a diplomate, water resources engineer (D.WRE).

By | 2011-05-18T10:45:48+00:00 May 18, 2011|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |

CTE names 2011-13 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

SMU's Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors, 2011-13Four of SMU’s best teachers have been named 2011-13 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors by the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence. This year’s honorees are Marc Christensen, Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Alyce McKenzie, Homiletics, Perkins School of Theology; David Son, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; and Greg Warden, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts.

The new members of SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers will join returning members Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College; Randall Griffin, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts; Roy Heller, Old Testament, Perkins School of Theology; and Donald VandeWalle, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business.

Each year since 2001, the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Awards recognize four SMU faculty members for their commitment to and achievements in fostering student learning. “These are faculty whose concerns for higher education go beyond classroom boundaries and often the boundaries of their own discipline,” according to the CTE website. “They represent the highest achievement in reaching the goals of higher education.” The professorships are named for SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler.

Each recipient receives a $10,000 award and membership in SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers for the two years of their appointment as Altshuler Professors. Members participate actively with other members of the Academy to address issues in classroom teaching.

Above, the new Altshuler Professors were honored by the SMU Board of Trustees during its May 2011 meeting (left to right): SMU President R. Gerald Turner, Greg Warden, David Son, Alyce McKenzie, Marc Christensen and SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler.

(more…)

New gift establishes first Endowed Centennial Chair at SMU

Ross Perot Jr. and Sarah Fullinwider Perot with Jerome FullinwiderA new gift from Sarah and Ross Perot Jr. of Dallas will establish the Jerome M. Fullinwider Endowed Centennial Chair in Economic Freedom, named in honor of Mrs. Perot’s father. The chair-holder will join the faculty in the William J. O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom in SMU’s Cox School of Business.

The gift makes history for the University as its first endowed centennial chair, part of a new category of gifts to commemorate the 100th anniversary of SMU’s founding and opening. A position designated as “centennial” must meet elevated giving levels, be a combination of endowment funding and five years of annual support, and be created during the centennial celebration period – Jan. 1, 2011, through Dec. 31, 2015.

“This gift supports one of the top priorities of SMU’s Second Century Campaign and the University’s strategic plan – increasing the number of faculty positions that are endowed,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “When this campaign began, SMU had 62 endowed faculty positions. Our goal is to increase that number to 100. With other endowed chairs and professorships established during the campaign, this new commitment brings us to 83. We are deeply grateful for the generosity and foresight of the Perot and Fullinwider families for leading the way in establishing this centennial chair.”

The gift for the Fullinwider chair counts toward SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which at midpoint has raised more than $500 million to advance student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Jerome “Jerry” M. Fullinwider received a B.B.A. degree from SMU in 1951 and is a 1953 graduate of the U.S. Naval School of Justice in Newport, Rhode Island. Following graduation, he served with the U.S. Navy in Korea and China.

“My father has pursued his interest in free enterprise and expansion of global business relationships throughout his business career,” Sarah Perot said. “When he told us of his commitment to the O’Neil Center, Ross and I decided that an endowed faculty chair in his name would be a fitting way for us to recognize his achievements and to ensure the permanence of his interest long into the future.” The Perots added to his commitment to provide a total gift of $2 million for the centennial chair.

Above, Ross Perot Jr. and Sarah Fullinwider Perot with Jerome M. Fullinwider (right).

> Read more from SMU News
> Visit the O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom online

Marc Christensen named Bobby B. Lyle Professor in Engineering Innovation

Marc Christensen, SMU's Bobby B. Lyle Professor in Engineering InnovationSMU’s Lyle School of Engineering has appointed Marc P. Christensen to its Bobby B. Lyle Professorship in Engineering Innovation. He is the first professor to be named to the recently established chair.

Christensen came to SMU from industry as the co-founder of Applied Photonics Inc., a Washington, D.C. area-based company focusing on the development of a new method in multi-scale optical design. Since arriving at the University, he has served as chair of the Electrical Engineering Department, providing leadership to the faculty while pursuing greater departmental productivity in research.

“Marc is one of our most valued and inspiring classroom instructors, a true innovative engineer, and an extraordinary researcher continuously striving to create novel solutions for challenging problems on the forefront of engineering and science,” says Engineering Dean Geoffrey Orsak. “His co-development of the SMU Innovation Gymnasium ‘Innovation Fridays’ lecture series and his central role in the redesign of our first-year engineering experience are just two examples of how his entrepreneurial spirit, intellect and energy continue to motivate young engineers.”

Dr. Christensen has been awarded several optoelectronic design patents, with several more pending. In addition to his scholarship, he has written numerous articles for engineering journals and serves as an invited guest speaker at many conferences. He has also contributed to or been featured in articles that have appeared in Wired Magazine, Discovery Magazine and The Wall Street Journal.

Among his honors for teaching and research are the 2004 SEJC Electrical Engineering Department Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award, the 2007 SMU Golden Mustang Award, the 2007 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2008 Gerald J. Ford Research Fellowship, and the 2010 SEJC Electrical Engineering Department Outstanding Professor Award.

Christensen earned his bachelor’s degree in engineering physics at Cornell University in 1993. He received his master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1998 and his Ph.D. in electrical and computing engineering in 2001, both from George Mason University.

Volkan Otugen named to George R. Brown Chair in Mechanical Engineering

M. Volkan Otugen, SMU's George R. Brown Chair in Mechanical EngineeringSMU’s Lyle School of Engineering has named M. Volkan Otugen to its George R. Brown Chair in Mechanical Engineering. The appointment is effective as of March 2011.

The endowed position was established in 1995 and previously held by Jack Holman, who retired in 2005.

Otugen’s appointment recognizes his “exceptional record as an educator, researcher, and leader,” says Geoffrey Orsak, dean of the Lyle School. “His proven excellence in these areas, combined with his international reputation, provides tremendous value to students in the Mechanical Engineering Department, the Lyle School and to the entire SMU community.”

Currently, Otugen serves as chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department in the Lyle School, as well as director of the Micro Sensor Laboratory. His undergraduate courses include thermodynamics, aerodynamics and rocket propulsion. At the graduate level, he teaches transport phenomena and convective heat transfer.

The holder of two patents pertaining to micro-optical sensor technology, Otugen has won significant research support from NASA, the National Science Foundation and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in addition to continuous financial support from major international corporations. He serves on several international technical committees, including the Aerodynamic Measurement Technical Committee and the Sensor Systems Technical Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Otugen is a contributing author for more than 120 technical journal articles and conference papers. His honors and awards include recognition as a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a Fulbright Fellowship in 1998.

Dr. Otugen attended Istanbul Technical University, earning his B.S. degree in naval architecture and marine engineering in 1978. He earned his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering and mechanics from Drexel University in 1982 and 1986.

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