Three education innovators receive 2013 Simmons Luminary Awards

education issues

Three education innovators receive 2013 Simmons Luminary Awards

Educators dedicated to promoting evidence-based change for the betterment of students were honored Thursday, Jan. 24 by SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The Dallas Arboretum; Daniel P. King, superintendent of the Pharr-San Juan-Alamo School District in South Texas; and America’s Promise Alliance received 2013 Luminary Awards during ceremonies at the University.

  • The educational programs at the Dallas Arboretum introduce more effective instruction to more than 100,000 children in life and earth science each year.
  • Under Superintendent Daniel P. King’s leadership, several Texas school districts have been transformed from among the poorest performing to national models of success.
  • America’s Promise Alliance brings together more than 400 organizations dedicated to stemming the nation’s high dropout rate.

“The 2013 Luminary recipients are driven by the same level of dedication to do whatever it takes to impact students and get them engaged in learning,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean in the Simmons School. “America’s Promise Alliance, The Dallas Arboretum and Superintendent King deeply understand their mission, and with data have designed innovative approaches that work. Once students can understand that their community, region and nation are behind them, their aspirations become real.”

Click the YouTube screen to see a video about this year’s winners, or click here to open the 2013 Simmons Luminary Award video in a new windowvideo

> Read the full story from SMU News

January 30, 2013|News|

Tune In: When computers leave the classroom, so does boredom

Jose Bowen on 'Teaching Naked'Colleges worldwide are investing millions in “smart” classrooms, but Meadows Dean José Bowen has challenged his colleagues to “teach naked” – by which he means, sans machines. Dean Bowen believes too many professors use PowerPoint as a crutch rather than a creative tool – and class time should be reserved for discussion, he contends, especially now that students can download lectures online and find libraries of information on the web.

Statistics back him up: A study published in the April 2009 British Educational Research Journal found that 59 percent of students in a new survey reported that at least half of their lectures were boring, and that PowerPoint was one of the dullest methods they saw. They gave low marks not just to the popular slide-display program, but to all kinds of computer-assisted classroom activities, even interactive exercises in computer labs.

“The least boring teaching methods were found to be seminars, practical sessions, and group discussions,” said the report. In other words, tech-free classrooms were the most engaging.

Read more from The Chronicle of Higher Education, and watch Bowen’s video on “teaching naked.” video

August 17, 2009|Tune In|
Load More Posts