Texas Instruments grant will fund SMU training for DISD middle-school STEM teachers

DISD

Texas Instruments grant will fund SMU training for DISD middle-school STEM teachers

Texas Instruments logoSMU will receive $1.7 million to train as many as 216 Dallas Independent School District middle school science teachers. The program will begin in summer 2017 and run for four years.

Texas Instruments and the Texas Instruments Foundation have committed $5.4 million total to advance public school education in science, technology, engineering and math. Most of the funds will be distributed in North Texas, and the rest will be earmarked for programs in the San Francisco Bay Area and southern Maine, where the company operates design and manufacturing facilities.

Dubbed Power of STEM Education, the initiative supports primary and secondary school programs with a special emphasis on opportunities for girls and minorities, who are underrepresented in science and engineering professions.

“Our focus is on collaborative strategies to improve teaching effectiveness and student success in STEM education,” said Andy Smith, executive director of the TI Foundation and TI director of corporate philanthropy. “We seek out effective partners who share our goals, make strategic investments and develop long-term relationships with educators and their organizations to support proven, successful programs that can be scaled and replicated. Working together, we believe all students can move forward and experience greater success in STEM.”

> Read the full story from The Dallas Morning News

August 16, 2016|News|

Dallas mayor, leaders meet at SMU to discuss education May 7

'Block to Boardroom' mastheadDallas Mayor Mike Rawlings will join North Texas leaders in a public discussion on the community’s ethical role in supporting public education Monday, May 7, 2012 at SMU.

As Mike Miles prepares to take over as DISD superintendent, “From Your Block to the Boardroom” is designed to spark a conversation about the community’s role in supporting excellence in education. The event is co-hosted by SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, and Center on Communities and Education.

Simmons Dean David Chard will moderate the panel, which will include the Rev. Gerald Britt, vice president of CitySquare’s public policy and community program development; Florencia Velasco Fortner, CEO of Dallas Concilio; Torrence H. Robinson, Fluor Foundation senior director of community affairs; Bill McKenzie, Dallas Morning News columnist; and Todd Williams, executive director of Commit!.

“Our efforts with schools need to be sustained, and we hope that our dialogue at SMU can be the first in a series of discussions to determine how the community can make a difference and bolster the education of all students,” Chard says.

Maguire Center Director Rita Kirk will provide the ethical framework for the discussion. “We expect our school administrators and elected officials to hold the public trust and represent the best interests of our children, but what do we expect of our neighbor or local business, or even ourselves?” she says. Kirk will join Regina Nippert, executive director for SMU’s Center on Communities and Education, and Mayor Rawlings in underscoring the vital importance of supporting public education.

The panel discussion, including breakfast, takes place 7:30-9:30 a.m. at the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. Tickets are $50 for the public, $25 for SMU employees, and are available online at block2boardroom.eventbrite.com.

> Read more from SMU News

May 4, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|

Calendar Highlights: March 29, 2011

Margaret Spellings and Geoffrey CanadaTate Series focuses on the future of education: A discussion of the future viability of American education will be the focus of the next 2010-11 Tate Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, March 29. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings and Harlem Children’s Zone founder and CEO Geoffrey Canada will discuss “How Will We Teach America’s Children?” at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. Moderator for the event will be Keven Ann Willey, vice president and editorial page editor of The Dallas Morning News. Spellings was the U.S. Secretary of Education from 2005-09 and led the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act. She is president and CEO of Margaret Spellings and Company and a leading national expert in public policy. In 2009, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development recognized her contributions to education with the Simmons Luminary Award. The Harlem Children’s Zone was featured in the 2010 film “Waiting for ‘Superman’.” Through this program, Canada has dedicated the past 20 years to helping impoverished, at-risk youth to rise above their circumstances. The Zone Project today covers a 100-block area of Harlem and serves 10,000 children and their families through in-school and after-school programs, social services and community-building programs. The evening lecture is sold out, but the speakers will answer questions from the SMU community and local high school students during the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Tate Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Admission to the Student Forum is free. For more information, call Program Services at 214-768-8283 (214-SMU-TATE).

In addition, the Simmons School will present a free screening of “Waiting for ‘Superman'” at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. The screening will be followed by a Q&A session with panelists Charles Glover, executive director of Teach for America, Dallas; Israel Cordero, principal of the Dallas Independent School District’s W.W. Samuell High School; and Deborah Diffily, Simmons faculty member. The discussion will be moderated by Lee Alvoid, chair of Simmons’ Education Policy and Leadership Department. Refreshments will be provided. Cosponsored by the SMU Program Council, Sigma Lambda Beta International Fraternity Inc. and SMU Colony.

Main cast of 'Indigenes'French Film Festival continues: The 15th-anniversary celebration of SMU’s French Film Festival continues through April 9, 2011. Among the upcoming screenings is Daratt (2006) on Friday, April 1. Written and directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and winner of a Grand Special Jury Prize (UNESCO Award) at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, the film deals with themes of family, vengeance and redemption in the aftermath of the devastating civil war in Chad. The festival continues Wednesday, April 6, with Indigènes (Days of Glory, 2006). César and Lumière award-winning cowriter and director Rachid Bouchareb tells the stories of four North African recruits who fight to liberate France during World War II, as well as for equal treatment in the French military and society. All screenings are at 7 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater, and all films will be shown in French with English subtitles. Admission is free and open to the public. These films are intended for an adult audience and may contain sexual content, nudity and violence. Sponsored by the SMU French Club, the SMU Students’ Association and the Tournées Festival. For more information and a complete schedule, visit the 2011 French Film Festival homepage.
(Right, Roschdy Zem, Samy Naceri, Jamel Debbouze and Sami Bouajila in Indigènes.)

March 29, 2011|Calendar Highlights|
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