Campus celebrates Veterans Day 2013

digital collections

Campus celebrates Veterans Day 2013

SMU Veterans pinVeterans Day 2013 is Monday, Nov. 11, and SMU will honor its military vets in many ways this week:

• SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility will present SMU Veteran lapel pins to all University vets – students, faculty and staff – to recognize their service and identify their membership with the University’s veteran community. The Maguire Center will present pins 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11 at the Main Quad flagpole. In addition, Ruthie’s Rolling Café will offer free sandwiches to vets wearing their pins.

• The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum will offer free admission to all veterans, retirees, active duty, National Guard, Reserve, and Coast Guard service members on Veterans Day. The Museum is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Veterans Day 2013; the offer is good for all tickets sold at the admissions desk that day, but not applicable to tickets sold online. Any service member participating in the free admission offer will be asked to show a form of identification upon purchasing their tickets. For more information, e-mail bush43media@nara.gov.

• The Office of the Provost hosts a luncheon honoring veterans 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. The keynote speaker is U.S. Army Col. Miguel Howe (Ret.), director of the Military Service Initiative in the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Special presentations will also be made by:

  • SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden
  • University Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo (U.S. Navy 1975-77, U.S. Navy Reserve 1978-80)
  • SMU Chief of Police Richard Shafer (U.S. Air Force 1973-94)
  • SMU Color Guard
  • Associate Vice President for Campus Services Julie Wiksten ’78, ’92
  • Brandon Montgomery ’14, president, U.S. Military Veterans of SMU (U.S. Marine Corps 2005-10)
  • Blake Helm ’14 (M.B.A.), vice president, Cox Veterans in Business (U.S. Army, 2005-12)

• In addition, the Office of the Provost and SMU Military Veterans are collecting holiday toys and care package items during the luncheon. Please bring a new unwrapped toy for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys For Tots program and personal items for active-duty U.S. military service members. Visit the United Service Organizations (USO) website for a list of suggested care package items.

• SMU’s Central University Libraries invite you to view one of DeGolyer Library’s finest collections in digitized form: the Melvin C. Shaffer World War II Photographs. Shaffer’s evocative images depict the indigenous populations and local conditions of North Africa, Italy, Southern France, and Germany from 1943 to 1945. Included are 19 images of Mount Vesuvius that depict the volcano before, during and after its eruption in 1944.

November 8, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU Digital Repository ready for faculty submissions

SMU Digital Repository logoSMU’s Central University Libraries, Office of Research and Graduate Studies, and Office of Information Technology have combined resources to create the SMU Digital Repository, an online archive for collecting and sharing the scholarly work of SMU faculty, staff and students.

The repository is the product of a strategic partnership headed by CUL Dean and Director Gillian McCombs, Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies Jim Quick, and Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo.

Using the Digital Commons software platform created by Berkeley Electronic Press, the SMU Digital Repository provides open access to research documents, articles, preprints, working papers, conference agendas and papers, and scholarly image collections created by SMU faculty, students, and academic staff.

The Digital Commons software also allows the publishing of open-access or subscription-based journals, and includes journal management software to customize workflows.

In the early stages of building the repository, “we’re focused on getting faculty members comfortable with the interface and with the idea of storing their work online,” says Josh Lupkin, faculty liaison for the Digital Repository. “Professors are used to communicating with colleagues in particular ways and publishing in venues specific to their fields. We’re not competing with those, but offering them another way to showcase their work and to make it more visible and accessible.”

Repository staff members are available to address any questions regarding storage, Lupkin says. For example, “some faculty members may have concerns about uploading papers to the Repository, because of publishing agreements. In those cases, we may be able to store an abstract with descriptive keywords and an outside link to the full publication.

“Above all else, this is a service to faculty that will afford them and their departments the benefits of increased relevance in Google and other searches.”

Details about the Digital Repository, including information about submitting materials, can be found at digitalrepository.smu.edu. Digital Repository team members are also available to present information sessions tailored to individual schools, departments and centers.

The University’s Norwick Center for Digital Services (nCDS) works with faculty and academic units to identify, manage, upload and present a wide range of text, image, video, audio, database, and other files that showcase SMU’s research and scholarly achievements. The Scholarly Digitization Program – offered by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies – funds digitization of materials through the nCDS for University faculty and staff members who would like to contribute nondigital materials to the Repository but lack the technology or funds required to digitize them. Up to $25,000 per semester is available, and applicants can apply for up to $5,000 of funding per project. The funding application form is available online.

The Repository is working with the Office of Engaged Learning to create a space for approved student work, Lupkin says. Papers from the first three students to complete Engaged Learning projects will be uploaded by May 2012. “The Repository will also give graduate students a forum for getting their work out into the world, after consultation with faculty advisors,” he adds. “It’s all about making connections.”

The Repository can even provide an online home for conferences hosted by a University center or department, Lupkin says. “This could mean anything from storing programs, papers and abstracts to presenting audio or video of individual sessions,” he says. “We can tailor the experience depending on the host entity’s needs.”

For more information, contact Josh Lupkin or Rob Walker at digitalrepository@list.smu.edu.

> Visit the SMU Digital Repository
> Create an SMU Digital Repository account
> Learn more from the SMU Digital Repository FAQ
Learn how to submit materials to the SMU Digital Repository

March 8, 2012|News|

DeGolyer Library exhibit covers 175 years of Texas fiction

Cover of 'A Love Story of Mineral Wells'A new exhibit in SMU’s DeGolyer Library offers samples of Texas fiction spanning 175 years, since before the state became a republic.

“From Live Boys to Lonesome Dove: A Panoramic View of Texas Fiction, 1836- 2011″ begins with a few works that predate Texas Independence, such as L’Heroine du Texas; ou, Voyage de Madame *** aux Etats-Unis et au Mexique. From this fictional account of the French utopian colony at Champ d’Asile, the exhibit proceeds through the antebellum period, the age of the dime novel, local color, romanticism, realism, “westerns,” and the contemporary scene.

DeGolyer promises numerous surprises, such as the first novel printed in Fort Worth, Jo: A Telegraphic Tale (1885), and Mamie Winn’s A Love Story of Mineral Wells, the first (and possibly the last) novel printed in Mineral Wells, 1915.

With more than 200 books on display, from high-brow to low-brow, the exhibition also offers visitors the opportunity to place the work of writers with some measure of literary acclaim (for example, Katherine Anne Porter, William Humphrey, William Goyen, Larry McMurtry, and many others) in historical context.

The exhibit, which is free and open to the public, continues through Dec. 15, 2011. DeGolyer is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, except holidays.

> Watch an SMU News slide show of images from the Texas fiction exhibition slide show

September 22, 2011|Calendar Highlights, News|

Discover-ing SMU Libraries’ revolutionary search engine

Librarian in the stacksSMU Libraries are pioneering a revolutionary service that allows students and faculty to search the library the same way they search the Internet.

The Discover SMU Libraries service, found on the SMU Libraries’ homepage in the Quick Search box, lets users search thousands of the libraries’ resources – books, articles, newspapers, databases and more – from a single search box. The SMU Libraries are one of a handful of university library systems around the world who are pioneering this simple, instant search of library collections.

Studies show that students and faculty prefer the quality of information found in libraries, but find web-style searching simpler and more straightforward. The Discover SMU Libraries service is designed to mimic open web search methods, delivering the kind of content that only the library holds.

“Offering this revolutionary service to our community [was] a culmination of several months of investigation, evaluation and planning by SMU Libraries and Office of Information Technology staff,” said Toni Nolen, IT Services Librarian at Fondren Library Center, who led the implementation effort. “We are excited to introduce this user-friendly service that will help researchers find the best information provided by the SMU Libraries for their needs.”

The Discover SMU Libraries service was created by Serials Solutions, a Seattle-based company that specializes in developing technology that enables university libraries to more easily manage their electronic content collections. The company developed the service in conjunction with universities on three continents and also works with thousands of publishers to pre-load content into a single repository of information – much like the web, but specific to each library’s holdings. The service’s technology allows searching to be precise and fast so that students and faculty spend less time hunting for the right information.

The Discover SMU Libraries search includes records from the SMU Libraries catalog, SMU Libraries Digital Collections, Central University Libraries research guides, and may index some or all of the libraries’ databases and journals.

> Read more from SMU News
> Enter a DIscover library search term with SMU Libraries’ Quick Search box

August 24, 2011|News|
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