Krauthammer, Moyers close 2011-12 Tate season May 1

Derek Hubbard

Krauthammer, Moyers close 2011-12 Tate season May 1

Award-winning journalists and commentators Charles Krauthammer and Bill Moyers visit SMU May 1 for the final event of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series season. They will give the Gregg and Molly Engles Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Charles KrauthammerWinner of the Pulitzer Prize and named by The Financial Times as the most influential commentator in America, Charles Krauthammer has received honors for his writing from every part of the political spectrum, including People for the American Way’s First Amendment Award and the Bradley Foundation’s Bradley Prize. Since 1985, he has written a syndicated column for The Washington Post, for which he won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary. It is published weekly in more than 240 newspapers worldwide.

Krauthammer is a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington. He is also a contributor to FOX News, appearing nightly on FOX’s evening program, Special Report with Bret Baier.

Follow Charles Krauthammer on Twitter @krauthammer

Bill MoyersA survey of television critics by Television Quarterly, the official journal of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, placed Bill Moyers among the 10 journalists who have had the most significant influence on television news. He has received more than 30 Emmy Awards for excellence and 2 prestigious Gold Baton awards, the highest honor of the Alfred I. duPont Columbia University Award. He has also won 9 Peabody Awards and 3 George Polk Awards, including the Career Achievement Award.

Before establishing Public Affairs Television in 1986, Moyers served as executive editor of Bill Moyers’ Journal on public television, senior news analyst for the CBS Evening News, and chief correspondent for the acclaimed documentary series CBS Reports. Two of his public television series, Creativity (1982) and A Walk Through the 20th Century (1984), were named Outstanding Informational Series by the Academy of Arts and Sciences. With his wife and partner, Public Affairs Television President Judith Davidson Moyers, he has produced hundreds of hours of programming for public television. Currently, he is the host of Moyers & Company.

Follow Bill Moyers on Twitter @billmoyers

Krauthammer and Moyers will answer questions from SMU community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. May 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask the speakers a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #TateSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

The Tate Series’ 2012-13 season will be announced at the evening event, which is sold out. Watch the SMU Forum for more information after the announcement, and learn more at smu.edu/tateseries.

May 1, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Walter Isaacson to give Tate Lecture at SMU March 27, 2012

Walter IsaacsonWalter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute and author of a best-selling biography of the late Steve Jobs, comes to SMU March 27 as part of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Lacerte Family Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

As chief executive of the Aspen Institute, Isaacson leads the senior management of the nonpartisan educational and policy studies institute based in Washington, D.C. He also serves as chairman of the board of Teach for America, which recruits recent college graduates to teach in underserved communities.

Follow Walter Isaacson on Twitter @walterisaacson

Isaacson’s most recent book, Steve Jobs, was published by Simon & Schuster in October 2011, mere days after the inventor’s death from pancreatic cancer. It was named one of the “Best Books of 2011” by Amazon.com, where it also became the best-selling book of that year. In addition, it topped the New York Times nonfiction best-seller list for nine weeks and has remained on the chart continuously for 21 weeks as of the April 1, 2012 list.

Other books by Isaacson include Einstein: His Life and Universe (2007), Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2003), and Kissinger: A Biography (1992). In addition, he was coauthor with Evan Thomas of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made (1986).

Isaacson began his career at The Sunday Times of London and then worked for The New Orleans Times-Picayune/States-Item. He joined TIME in 1978 and served as a political correspondent, national editor, and editor of new media before becoming the magazine’s 14th editor in 1996. Isaacson became chairman and CEO of CNN in 2001 and president and CEO of the Aspen Institute in 2003.

He was appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as the chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, and other international broadcasts of the United States, a position he held until 2012. For two years after Hurricane Katrina, from 2005-07, Isaacson served as vice-chair of the Louisiana Recovery Authority.

Currently, Isaacson is vice-chair of Partners for a New Beginning, a public-private group tasked with forging ties between the United States and the Muslim world. In addition, he serves on the boards of United Airlines and Tulane University, as well as the Board of Overseers of Harvard University.

A New Orleans native, Isaacson is a graduate of Harvard College and of Pembroke College of Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He lives with his wife and daughter in Washington, D.C.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Isaacson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 27 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Isaacson a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #IsaacsonSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

March 27, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Food & culture writer Michael Pollan to give Tate Lecture March 1

Author and essayist Michael PollanMichael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and other bestsellers about “the places where food and culture intersect,” visits SMU March 1 as the next speaker in the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

For more than 20 years, Pollan has been writing books and articles about the places where the human and natural worlds meet: food, agriculture, gardens, drugs and architecture. He wrote the bestsellers In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, which was named one of the 10 best books of 2006 by The New York Times and The Washington Post. It also won the California Book Award and the James Beard Award for best food writing, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

> Follow Michael Pollan on Twitter @michaelpollan

Pollan’s previous book, The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, was also a New York Times bestseller, received the Borders Original Voices Award for the best non-fiction work of 2001, and was recognized as one of the best books of the year by the American Booksellers Association and Amazon.com. PBS premiered a two-hour special documentary based on The Botany of Desire in fall 2009. His most recent book is Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, which was an immediate # 1 New York Times bestseller upon publication.

A contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine since 1987, Pollan has received numerous writing awards, including the James Beard Award for best magazine series in 2003; the John Burroughs Prize for best natural history essay in 1997; the QPB New Vision Award for his first book, Second Nature (1991); the 2000 Reuters-I.U.C.N. Global Award for Environmental Journalism for his reporting on genetically modified crops; and the 2003 Humane Society of the United States’ Genesis Award for his writing on animal agriculture. His articles have appeared in Harper’s (where he served for many years as executive editor), Mother Jones, Gourmet, Vogue, Travel + Leisure, Gardens Illustrated and The Nation.

In 2010, Pollan was named to the TIME Magazine “TIME 100” in the Thinkers category. In 2009 he was named one of the top 10 “New Thought Leaders” by Newsweek magazine.

In 2003, Pollan was appointed the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism at UC-Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, and the director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism. In addition to teaching, he lectures widely on food, agriculture and gardening.

Pollan grew up on Long Island and was educated at Bennington College, Oxford University, and Columbia University, from which he received a Master’s degree in English. He lives in the Bay Area with his wife, the painter Judith Belzer, and their son, Isaac.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Pollan will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Pollan a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #PollanSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

February 28, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Dead Aid author Dambisa Moyo to give 2011-12 Tate Lecture Feb. 6

Author and international economist Dambisa MoyoInternational economist Dambisa Moyo, one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2009, visits campus Monday, Feb. 6, to deliver the Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture in SMU’s 2011-12 Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. Her talk begins at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Moyo is the author of the New York Times bestseller Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. She argues that financial aid, rather than helping Africa, has actually harmed it and should be phased out. Instead, she offers proposals for developing countries to finance their own development. Her latest book, How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead, is now available.

In 2009, Moyo was named one of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World” by TIME Magazine and was nominated to the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders Forum. Her writing regularly appears in economic and finance-related publications such as the Financial Times, the Economist and The Wall Street Journal. In addition, she has appeared as a guest on CNN, CNBC,  the BBC and Fox Business Network, among others.

Moyo is a patron of Absolute Return for Kids (ARK), a hedge fund supporting children’s charity, and serves on the Board of Directors of Room to Read, a San Francisco-based nonprofit that provides educational opportunities to local communities in the developing world.

A native of Lusaka, Zambia, Moyo earned her Ph.D. degree in economics from Oxford University and holds a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She completed a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and an M.B.A. in finance at American University in Washington, D.C.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Moyo will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 6 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Moyo a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #MoyoSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

February 6, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|
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