SMU announces Meadows dean search committee

David Chard

SMU announces Meadows dean search committee

SMU has announced the members of a search committee to identify candidates for dean of the University’s Meadows School of the Arts. The 19-member committee includes the chair of SMU’s Board of Trustees; the chair and several members of the Executive Board of Meadows School of the Arts; University faculty members; and two Meadows School directors, as well as two Meadows students.

Current Meadows Dean José Antonio Bowen has been named president of Goucher College in the Baltimore area. He will continue his SMU service through June 2014.

David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, will serve as committee chair. In addition to Chard, the Meadows Dean’s Search Committee includes:

  • Linda Pitts Custard, chair of the Meadows Museum Advisory Council and member of the Executive Board and Campaign Steering Committee, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Bess Enloe, former chair of the Executive Board, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Linda Perryman Evans, president and CEO, The Meadows Foundation
  • Melissa Fetter, chair of the Executive Board and member of the Campaign Steering Committee, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Caren Prothro, chair, SMU Board of Trustees

Faculty members (Meadows School of the Arts unless otherwise noted):

  • Rhonda Blair, professor, Division of Theatre
  • Patty Harrington Delaney, associate professor and chair, Division of Dance
  • Hemang Desai, department chair and Robert B. Cullum Professor of Accounting, Cox School of Business
  • Virginia Dupuy, professor of voice, Division of Music
  • Maria Dixon Hall, associate professor and director of Mustang Consulting, Division of Communication Studies
  • Pamela Elrod Huffman, associate professor and director of choral activities, Division of Music
  • Pamela Patton, professor and chair, Division of Art History
  • Tony Pederson, professor and The Belo Foundation Endowed Distinguished Chair, Division of Journalism
  • Jay Sullivan, professor, Division of Art


  • Mark Roglán, Linda P. and William A. Custard Director and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts, Meadows Museum
  • Kris Vetter, assistant dean for development and external affairs, Meadows School of the Arts


  • Adrian Aguirre, dance performance and film major
  • Katie Schaible, dance performance and international studies major
June 4, 2014|For the Record, News|

Simmons Dean David Chard elected chair of National Board for Education Sciences

David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU's Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human DevelopmentDavid Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been elected by fellow board members as chairman of the National Board for Education Sciences, effective immediately.

The U.S. Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Chard to the board in 2012. The 15-member board oversees and directs the work of the Institute of Education Sciences.

“Schools throughout the nation will benefit from David Chard’s leadership of this important board,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His support of evidence-based education practices will help ensure that proven teaching strategies make their way to the classroom.”

One of the board’s functions is to advise the research priorities for the Institute of Education Sciences, the primary research and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education.

The institute collects and analyzes education research data and funds researchers nationwide who are working to improve education outcomes for all students, particularly those at risk. In addition, the institute produces the Nation’s Report Card. As chair, Chard succeeds Bridget Terry Long from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she is academic dean and the Xander Professor of Education.

Supporting education must be more than rhetoric, Chard says. “We can’t talk about how important education is to the future of our country when we invest so little in knowing what works and for whom it works in the classroom,” he says. “Taxpayer dollars have to be wisely invested in education research and the results of research must be incorporated into our classrooms and schools.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News


February 18, 2014|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News|

2014 Simmons Luminary Awards honor advocates for children

SMU Simmons Luminary Award logoFour organizations that advocate for the education and well-being of at-risk children will be honored Thursday, Jan. 23, by SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The East Dallas Community Schools, TexProtects, the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children will receive 2014 Luminary Awards at 6:30 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

“This year’s honorees exemplify the power of collaboration and will to create movements that champion children who are poor, neglected or abused,” says David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of the Simmons School. “These children, like any other, deserve a healthy childhood and a good education; the recipients of the Luminary Award shine an important light on what we need to advance.”

• For 35 years, the East Dallas Community Schools (EDCS) have documented the power of high-quality early childhood education, particularly education that starts young and involves the parents. Based on the Montessori education model, staff at the three EDCS campuses provide parents of 550 students with information, encouragement and support. The schools are located in high-risk Dallas areas and open to children ages nine or younger, regardless of income. School founder and director Terry Nelson Ford, a 1974 SMU graduate, will accept the Luminary Award for local excellence.

• The Texas Association for the Protection of Children (TexProtects) was created in 2004 to advocate for reform and better funding of Child Protective Services in Dallas and across the state. The research and advocacy organization is dedicated to representing the needs of Texas children who have been the victims of abuse and neglect by educating decision-makers and the public about child abuse. Founder and director Madeline McClure will accept the Luminary Award for regional achievement.

• The Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children work with state, local and national child advocates to improve the lives of children. Marian Wright Edelman created the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973 after observing poverty’s devastating effects on children while working with Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign in the 1960s. The organization advocates for better health care, child care and nutrition, equal educational opportunities and leadership training for children, particularly disadvantaged children. Jonah Edelman will accept the national Luminary Award for the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children.

The Luminary Award was created in 2009 by the Simmons School to honor individuals and organizations that have shown an extraordinary commitment to improving people’s lives through education. The award is given annually to a local, regional and national recipient.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

January 23, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|

Michael McLendon named Centennial Chair in Simmons

Michael McLendon, SMU's Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial ChairMichael McLendon, associate dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been named the Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial Chair. McLendon, a noted higher education policy and leadership scholar, is the Simmons School’s first Centennial Chair – one of three academic positions made possible as part of a $25 million gift from Mr. and Mrs. Simmons in February 2013.

Two endowed positions to be filled in 2014 are the Patsy and Ray Caldwell Centennial Chair, initially to be directed in the Simmons School’s Department of Teaching and Learning, and the Glenn Simmons Endowed Professorship, to be based first in the Department of Applied Physiology and Wellness.

The recipient of numerous teaching and mentoring awards, McLendon teaches graduate courses on public policy and education, university governance and finance, leadership and American public policy.

In 2013 McLendon received national recognition for his research contributing to public debates about K-12 and higher education. He has been a principal investigator or lead consultant on national studies funded by the Lumina Foundation, National Science Foundation and the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges.

McLendon’s widely published research centers primarily on factors influencing policy change at both the state and campus levels, with a particular focus on how political behavior shapes states’ policy choices. He also has studied the effects of campus and state policies on college student success.

“Through his superb scholarship and dedication to the higher education field, Michael will integrate research-based solutions with practice and policy, and make a mark on the way colleges and universities evolve,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons dean of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. “The Simmons School is enormously privileged to have him fill the school’s first Centennial chair. His caliber of scholarship and teaching immediately elevates us in important state and national policy conversations.”

“I’m deeply honored to hold the Simmons School’s first endowed Centennial Chair,” McLendon said. “My aim is to help position the Simmons School and SMU as research leaders around matters of education policy and policy reform and as conveners of important conversations nationally on the future of higher education.”

McLendon joined SMU in 2012 after serving as a professor of public policy and higher education at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College, where he was executive associate dean and chief of staff from 2008 to 2011. He holds a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in higher education from Florida State University and a B.A. in political science from Baylor University. Before his doctoral studies, the Texas native served as a policy analyst in the Florida House of Representatives and as a staff member in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C.

In addition to the creation of these three academic positions, the Simmons’ recent financial commitment also will fund a new building for the expanding programs of the school. The new facility will be named Harold Clark Simmons Hall, in honor of Mr. Simmons, at the request of Mrs. Simmons, a 1957 SMU alumna.

> Read the full story from SMU News

January 13, 2014|News|

SMU announces new $25 million gift to the Simmons School

Harold C. and Annette Caldwell Simmons

Annette and Harold C. Simmons have committed a new $25 million gift to SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

Harold C. and Annette Caldwell Simmons have committed a new gift of $25 million to SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

Their gift will fund a new building for the expanding programs of the school and support three new endowed academic positions. The new facility will be named Harold Clark Simmons Hall, in honor of Mr. Simmons, at Mrs. Simmons’ request.

Their combined gifts of $45 million to the school make Harold and Annette Simmons’ commitment among the largest to SMU’s Second Century Campaign, also making them among the most generous donors in SMU’s 100-year history.

Watch the announcement on YouTube in a new window

“We are truly fortunate to count the Simmons as partners in our academic mission and greatly value their leadership and generosity,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “They have established an enduring legacy of service and generosity benefitting SMU and show great foresight by supporting education. Since its creation less than a decade ago, the Simmons School has made significant and rapid contributions addressing the challenges facing schools and educators.”

> Robert Miller, DMN: Harold and Annette Simmons give $25 million to SMU

“Since our first gift to the school in 2007, we have been pleased to see the rapid progress the school has made in developing programs aimed at addressing the greatest challenges in our nation’s schools,” said Harold Simmons. “Our investment has resulted in the formation of innovative programs for education and human development, the hiring of outstanding faculty leading research that makes a difference, and growing outreach to communities with solutions that work. This progress is worthy of continued investment, which we are pleased to lead.”

“This extraordinary gift enables our school to leave a more durable imprint as we increase our capacity for making an impact,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons Dean of the Simmons School. “The new building and endowed faculty positions will enable us to expand dramatically the scope and quality of our teaching, research and service.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

February 21, 2013|News|
Load More Posts