Calendar Highlights: Sept. 22, 2009

Darwin Year

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 22, 2009

'Tainted Souls and Painted Faces' book coverGilbert Lecture Series: Johns Hopkins University Professor Amanda Anderson (Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture) will discuss the role of political ideology in the works of authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell and Anthony Trollope in “Politics and the 19th-Century British Novel” Sept. 22 in DeGolyer Library. Reception in the Texana Room at 6 p.m., lecture in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room at 6:30 p.m. Cosponsored by the Department of English and DeGolyer Library. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series homepage.

Turn down the noise: Feeling the burn of too much stress? Learn positive ways to cope at noon Sept. 23 in Room 205, Memorial Health Center. Faculty and staff earn 1 Wellpower credit for attending. Sponsored by Counseling and Psychiatric Services. For more information, contact Marianne Stout.

Celebrating Darwin: Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and The Friends of KERA host a celebration of the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species and the 200th birthday of Charles Darwin Sept. 24 in DeGolyer Library. Guest speakers include Paula Apsell (’08 honoris causa), “NOVA” senior executive producer; and Melanie Wallace, “NOVA” senior series producer. Reception at 10 a.m., lecture at 10:30 a.m. RSVP to 214-768-3225 or Cynthia Ruppi.

'Beyond Nations' by John Chavez, bookcover“Tragic” love: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 6 (“Tragic”) at 8 p.m. Sept. 25 and 3 p.m. Sept. 27 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Clements Center Brown Bag: SMU History Professor John Chávez will discuss his new book tracing the evolution of “peripheral” ethnic homelands around the North Atlantic in “Beyond Nations: Evolving Homelands in the North Atlantic World, 1400-2000.” The event begins at noon Sept. 30 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch.

Sounds of India: The Meadows School of the Arts presents a concert of classical South Indian music with percussionist and Grammy Award nominee Poovalur Srinivasan and his group, Karnatic Kutcherri, at noon Sept. 30 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. The show is part of the Expanding Your Horizons Brown Bag Concert Series. Admission is free; bring your lunch. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

September 22, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

Robert Moyzis to give 2009 Collegium da Vinci Public Lecture

Biological chemist Robert MoyzisRecent research that suggests human culture may have had a profound effect on shaping our DNA will be the topic of the Collegium da Vinci’s 2009 Darwin’s Evolving Legacy Public Lecture. Robert Moyzis, professor of biological chemistry at the University of California-Irvine, will address the question, “Are Humans Still Evolving?” at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in the Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Center.

Moyzis’ work focuses on human DNA, particularly the tips of human chromosomes, known as telomeres. His mapping of these areas as part of the Human Genome Project revealed that these telomeres – previously thought to be “junk DNA” – contain active sequences that may play important roles in cancer and aging. His most recent research suggests that as much as 10 percent of the human genome is still evolving and that the process may actually have accelerated during the past several thousand years.

In 1993, Moyzis won the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science for “distinguished contributions to the field of molecular genetics,” citing research that “point[s] to the existence of a new type of DNA code that is ‘structural’ in nature and is shared by the DNA of many other organisms.”

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Collegium da Vinci office, 214-768-1177.

Learn more at the Collegium da Vinci homepage

September 15, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2009

Illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250, from SMU's Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible CollectionGood books: Nearly 60 remarkable bibles – including Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and early American editions – are on view in “The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection” in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library, through Dec. 11, 2009. For more information call 214-768-3483 or visit the Bridwell Library website. (Right, a page from an illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250.)

Patriotic pride: SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2009 at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution and the traveling Liberty Bell will be present, and cake and punch will be served. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 214-768-4498.

Remembering a pioneer: Author and editor Charlotte Whaley will give a lecture on her latest work – a collection of memoirs by Alice Marriott, one of the first women in the Southwest to hold an advanced degree in anthropology and who studied Southwestern American Indian culture. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by a book signing for Alice Marriott Remembered. All events take place in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and DeGolyer Library. For more information, call 214-768-3225.

“Holocaust Legacies” lecture: Georgetown University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Beauchamp, senior research scholar with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and primary author of the Belmont Report, will participate in a lecture and panel discussion, “From the Nuremburg Code to the Belmont Report and the Final Rule: The Protection of Human Research Subjects in the 21st Century,” Sept. 17 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program as part of “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point.” Free and open to the public.

'Galileo Goes to Jail' book coverStanton Sharp Lecture: Author, editor and historian Ronald L. Numbers (Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion), Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss “Anti-Evolution in America: From Creation Science to Intelligent Design” Sept. 18 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 3:30 p.m., lecture at 4 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History, Dedman College. For more information, contact the history department, 214-768-2967, or visit its Sharp Lectures web page.

Fun and games: Prospective students can explore The Guildhall at SMU during its Fall 2009 open house, 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 19 at the SMU-in-Plano campus, 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2. Activities include food and games for all ages and a bounce house for kids, plus LEGO Star Wars for gaming enthusiasts. RSVP online at the Guildhall website.

Tate-Willson Lecture: Nigel Biggar – Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology and director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at the University of Oxford – will discuss “Behaving in Public: Christian Ethics in a Polyglot Secularity” at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 in 106 Prothro Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Graduate Program in Religious Studies Office, 214-768-2432. Presented by the Graduate Program in Religious Studies and cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

September 15, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 9, 2009

'Darwin's Evolving Legacy' logoThe joy of science: SMU professors from multiple schools and disciplines will participate in a faculty symposium on “The Year of Darwin” 9:30 a.m.-noon Sept. 12 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Participants include David Meltzer and Ronald Wetherington, Anthropology, Dedman College; Larry Ruben and John Wise, Biological Sciences, Dedman College; Louis Jacobs, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College; and Rhonda Blair, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts. Presented by the Office of the Provost, Dedman College, Meadows School of the Arts, and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. For more information, contact Pia Vogel, 214-768-1790, or visit the “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” homepage.

Adobe churchInterdisciplinary Dialogue: The interplay between basic social science research and action research will be at the center of “Research on Latino Religious Topics: A Challenge to Scholars,” moderated by Harold Recinos, professor of church and society, Perkins School of Theology; and Hector Rivera, assistant professor, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. The event begins Sept. 16 in the Prothro Hall Refectory (Room 104) with a light dinner at 6:30 p.m. and discussion 7-8:30 p.m.

Going green: The City of Dallas and more than 20 vendors will present sustainable products and other green solutions as part of SMU’s first Sustainability Fair for students, faculty and staff. The event takes place 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Hors d’oeuvres will be served along with tea and lemonade. Presented by SMU Purchasing.

Recycling logoGodbey Lecture Series: Associate Professor of Hispanic American Literature Francisco Morán of Dedman College will discuss “Why Poetry Matters: Playing ‘Ajedrez’ (Chess) with Language” Sept. 17 at Maggiano’s NorthPark Center. The lecture begins at 11 a.m., followed by lunch at noon. The cost is $45 for Godbey members, $65 for non-members. Register online or call 214-768-2532.

September 9, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

Early editions highlight DeGolyer’s ‘Origin’ exhibition

Early editions of Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species'When Charles Darwin‘s On the Origin of Species was first published in 1859, only 1,250 copies of the book were printed. Subsequent printings were not much larger, 3,000 at the most, despite five additional editions published through 1872.

The collections of SMU’s DeGolyer Library include a copy of each of the six editions published in Darwin’s lifetime, as well as the numerous impressions made for each edition – including more than 60 volumes printed through 1890. Those editions form the nucleus of a major exhibit about the father of evolution.

“On the Origin of Species: Texts and Contexts for Charles Darwin’s Great Work” will appear Sept. 8-Dec. 9, 2009, as part of “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy,” SMU’s yearlong celebration honoring both the 150th anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s seminal text and the 200th anniversary of his birth. The exhibition will be accompanied by comments from the popular press of the time, as well as other books and publications by Darwin, including his famous The Voyage of the Beagle.

“The Charles Darwin collection is one of the hidden jewels in the library. While we are best known, perhaps, for our Western Americana and railroadiana, our books and journals in the history of science are extraordinary,” says Russell Martin, DeGolyer Library director.

“We hope the exhibit will be a visual feast,” Martin adds. “We”ll get to see how the book itself evolved over time – text, bindings – and how Darwin fit into the scientific and popular literature of his day. Many of the books are annotated by former readers, so we can see the notes his contemporaries made.”

Read more about the exhibition in the Spring 2009 issue of Annotations, the newsletter of SMU’s Central University Libraries.

Find more Darwin Year events
Visit DeGolyer Library online

September 1, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
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