Darwin Year

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 26, 2010

Simon Conway MorrisDarwin Year continues: Fellow of the Royal Society Simon Conway Morris (right), professor of evolutionary paleobiology at the University of Cambridge, will present “Darwin’s Compass: Why the Evolution of Humans is Inevitable” at 3 p.m. Jan. 29 in McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall. The lecture is part of SMU’s Darwin’s Evolving Legacy series and is sponsored by the University’s Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series; Morris appears at the co-invitation of SMU’s Departments of Mathematics and Biological Sciences. For more information, visit the Darwin’s Evolving Legacy homepage.

Student symphony stars: SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra presents a concert led by students in the Meadows School of the Arts‘ master’s degree program in orchestral conducting, and featuring winners of the Meadows Concerto Competition. The show begins at 8 p.m. Jan. 29 and 3 p.m. Jan. 31 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For tickets and information, contact the Meadows Box Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Ministers Week 2010: The annual gathering at SMU’s Perkins School of Theology complements the University’s 200th-anniversary celebration of Charles Darwin’s birth with “The Pew and the Petri Dish: Contemporary Issues in Religion and Science” Feb. 1-3 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Featured speakers include John Haught, senior fellow in science and religion at Georgetown University, author of God and the New Atheism, and winner of the 2002 Owen Garrigan Award in Science and Religion and the 2004 Sophia Award for Theological Excellence. Other lecturers include Gregory Cuellar, three-time fellow of the Hispanic Theological Initiative and adjunct professor of bible at Richland College, as well as SMU faculty members John Holbert, Rebekah Miles and William Abraham of the Perkins School and Mark Chancey of Dedman College. SMU community members can attend several Ministers Week events at discounted rates by visiting the Faculty/Staff/Student Registration page of the Ministers Week website.

Eugene Andolsek, 'Untitled 311C'Drawing inspiration: Artist and lifelong Rock Island Railroad employee Eugene Andolsek (1921-2008) produced thousands of drawings on graph paper over a period of 50 years, working alone at his kitchen table to ease the anxieties that plagued him his entire life. His work, exploring an array of colors and geometrical combinations, came to the attention of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, and Andolsek was one of five artists included in the 2006 Obsessive Drawing exhibition at the American Folk Art Museum in Manhattan. Now, selected works have been collected in a new exhibition at SMU – Kaleidoscope: Eugene Andolsek’s Geometric Ink Drawings runs Feb. 1-Mar. 20 in the Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. (Right, an untitled work featured in a 2008 Andolsek exhibition at the American Primitive Gallery in New York City.)

Beauty marked: SMU hosts a panel discussion examining the emphasis women place on striving for beauty and the damage they do to themselves in the process. “The Power and Burden of Beauty” features international artist Rachel Hovnanian, former national Fox News anchor Laurie Dhue; Bonnie Wheeler, director of medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College; Carolyn Hodges, senior sales director with Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Rachel Dodds, UT student and sorority member. The discussion takes place 5-6:30 p.m. Feb. 2 in Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. For more information, call Lisa Bytner at 917-951-8940.

Faculty Club Distinguished Luncheon Series: The SMU Faculty Club presents Jim Hollifield, professor of international political economy and director of SMU’s Tower Center for Political Studies, in the first of two lectures on “Immigration and Migration” at noon Feb. 3 in the Faculty Club. Cost is $12 for members, $15 for non-members. RSVP by Jan. 29 to Dee Powell, 214-768-3012.

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 17, 2009

Jane Buikstra“Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” lecture: Jane Buikstra (left), Regents’ Professor of Bioarchaeology and director of the Center for Bioarchaeological Research at Arizona State University, will give the Wendorf Distinguished Lecture in Archaeology. She will speak on “Tuberculosis: a Deep Time Perspective” at 5 p.m. Nov. 19 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

“Holocaust Legacies” series continues: SMU professors Virginia Dupuy (Meadows School of the Arts), Christopher Anderson (Perkins School of Theology) and John Holbert (Perkins School of Theology) present “Music Out of the Ashes,” a lecture/performance focusing on Victor Ullmann’s opera Der Kaiser von Atlantis, written in the Theresienstadt concentration camp but not performed until the 1970s. The evening will include scenes from the opera interspersed with commentary about the camp, the music and the composer and takes place 6-10 p.m. Nov. 19 in the Great Hall, Perkins Prothro Hall.

Meadows World Music EnsembleWorld music: Imaginative improvisation and plenty of jamming are part of the performance for the Meadows World Music Ensemble (right), directed by Jamal Mohamed. The group performs traditional works and original compositions at 8 p.m. Nov. 19 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public.

Chamber Music Honors Concert: The Meadows School of the Arts presents its most outstanding chamber music ensembles, performing a range of works composed for trios, quartets and quintets. The concert takes place at 8 p.m. Nov. 21 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public.

For a song: The Meadows Chorale and Concert Choir present “The Spirit Rejoices” at 8 p.m. Nov. 22 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. In lieu of admission, the choirs request voluntary donations to the North Texas Food Bank – give online or at the concert. For more information, call the Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 20, 2009

Scott ApplebyDarwin Year continues: Scott Appleby (right), professor of history and director of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame, will speak on “From Apocalypse to Accommodation: Catholic, Protestant and Jewish Responses to Darwin in America, 1865-1910” at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 20 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The lecture is the latest event in SMU’s year-long “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” series. Sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies in Dedman College, the Office of the Chaplain and Religious Life and the Catholic Campus Ministry. Free and open to the public.

Reading and results: SMU Distinguished Professor of Education Leadership and Policy Reid Lyon will speak on “Leadership Lessons: Turning the Agony of Reading Failure Around” at 8 a.m. Oct. 22 at the Park City Club, 17th floor, 5956 Sherry Lane in Dallas. The lecture is part of the Dallas Regional Chamber’s Focus on Education Series. Cost is $45 for non-Chamber members. Register online at the Chamber’s website; click on the Events tab.

President’s Leadership Summit: Hart Group Vice Chair and CEO Linda Hart will share her experiences and expertise with SMU students in President R. Gerald Turner’s Leadership Summit at 5 p.m. Oct. 22 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. No RSVP is needed. For more information, contact Leadership and Community Involvement, 214-768-4403.

Perkins Interdisciplinary Dialogue: The ongoing struggles of everyday life as a source of theological reflection and of women’s influence in society will be the topic of “Lo Cotidiano: Daily Life, Stage for Religious Understanding” Oct. 27 in the Prothro Hall Refectory, Room 104. The discussion will be moderated by Ada Maria Isasi Diaz, visiting professor, Perkins School of Theology; and Josephine Caldwell-Ryan, Women’s and Gender Studies, Dedman College. A light dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m., followed by discussion 7-8:30 p.m. To register, contact Rachel Lamb.

Faculty Club Distinguished Luncheon: SMU Associate Provost Ellen Jackofsky will speak on “Women at SMU: Creating and Continuing a Meaningful Legacy” in the next Distinguished Luncheon at noon Oct. 28 in the SMU Faculty Club. Lunch is $12 for members, $15 for nonmembers. RSVP by Oct. 23 to Dee Powell, 214-768-3012.

Tune In: Behind the Darwin debate

On Sept. 24, 2009, as part of a yearlong celebration of “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy,” SMU hosted a discussion of the legal, ethical and journalistic issues surrounding the making of the NOVA documentary film “Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial.” The panel included key participants in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District, the landmark case that inspired the PBS documentary.

Revisit the debate with John E. Jones, the federal judge who in 2005 barred a Pennsylvania public school district from teaching “intelligent design”; Paula Apsell and Melanie Wallace, NOVA producers of the documentary; plaintiff’s council Eric Rothschild; and Lauri Lebo, a Dover-area journalist and author of The Devil in Dover.

Click the YouTube screen to watch the panel discussion.

Visit SMU’s “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” homepage

Courtroom-classroom clash revisited in ‘Intelligent Design on Trial’

'Judgment Day' bannerA landmark federal court decision banning the teaching of creationism, and the NOVA film documentary that recounts the case, will be the focus of a series of events at SMU Sept. 24-25.

In 2005, federal Judge John E. Jones III banned the Dover, Pennsylvania, school district from teaching “intelligent design” in the classroom, ruling that the course of study had been introduced by the local school board for religious reasons and did not constitute science.

But the case was far from the final word. Many Americans still question evolution and believe that an alternative should be taught in public schools. In Texas, controversy over the teaching of science continues to roil meetings of the State Board of Education.

Several of the major players in the Dover trial, as well as professionals who later helped analyze its impact through the media, will be featured at SMU through an assortment of lectures, film screenings and panel discussions.

Paula ApsellThe programs begin Sept. 24 with a 10 a.m. reception and 10:30 a.m. lecture at DeGolyer Library, featuring Paula Apsell (right), senior executive producer, and Melanie Wallace, senior series producer of NOVA’s documentary, “Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial.” Those planning to attend should RSVP to 214-768-3225 or Cynthia Ruppi.

The documentary, “Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial,” will be screened at 4 p.m. Sept. 24 in O’Donnell Hall, Owen Arts Center. A panel discussion on legal, ethical and journalistic issues surrounding the making of the film will follow from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Panelists will include Judge Jones, documentary producers Apsell and Wallace, plaintiff’s council Eric Rothschild and Lauri Lebo, author of The Devil in Dover.

On Sept. 25, from 10-11:30 a.m., First Amendment issues will get closer scrutiny in a panel discussion at SMU’s Dedman School of Law. Jones, Rothschild (now in private practice), Liberty Legal Institute attorney Hiram Sasser and Dedman School of Law Professor Lackland Bloom will trade ideas and opinions in Karcher Auditorium, Storey Hall.

The series concludes Sept. 25 with reporter and author Lebo’s lecture from 2-3 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. Lebo will speak on “From Dover to Texas: Reporting on Extremist Views in a Fair and Balanced World” and sign copies of her book, The Devil in Dover.

NOVA Senior Executive Producer Apsell, who received an honorary degree from SMU in 2008, says the documentary underscores not only a historic court case, but also a critical science lesson.

“What happens when half of the population doesn’t accept one of the most fundamental underpinnings of the sciences?” Apsell asks. “Evolution is the absolute bedrock of the biological sciences. It’s essential to medical science, agriculture, and biotechnology. And it’s critical to understanding the natural world around us.”

The events are part of SMU’s yearlong “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” series. All are free and open to the public.

Read more from SMU News
Visit the “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” website
Learn more about the documentary at the NOVA homepage
Review Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District at Wikipedia

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 22, 2009

'Tainted Souls and Painted Faces' book coverGilbert Lecture Series: Johns Hopkins University Professor Amanda Anderson (Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture) will discuss the role of political ideology in the works of authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell and Anthony Trollope in “Politics and the 19th-Century British Novel” Sept. 22 in DeGolyer Library. Reception in the Texana Room at 6 p.m., lecture in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room at 6:30 p.m. Cosponsored by the Department of English and DeGolyer Library. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series homepage.

Turn down the noise: Feeling the burn of too much stress? Learn positive ways to cope at noon Sept. 23 in Room 205, Memorial Health Center. Faculty and staff earn 1 Wellpower credit for attending. Sponsored by Counseling and Psychiatric Services. For more information, contact Marianne Stout.

Celebrating Darwin: Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and The Friends of KERA host a celebration of the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species and the 200th birthday of Charles Darwin Sept. 24 in DeGolyer Library. Guest speakers include Paula Apsell (’08 honoris causa), “NOVA” senior executive producer; and Melanie Wallace, “NOVA” senior series producer. Reception at 10 a.m., lecture at 10:30 a.m. RSVP to 214-768-3225 or Cynthia Ruppi.

'Beyond Nations' by John Chavez, bookcover“Tragic” love: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 6 (“Tragic”) at 8 p.m. Sept. 25 and 3 p.m. Sept. 27 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Clements Center Brown Bag: SMU History Professor John Chávez will discuss his new book tracing the evolution of “peripheral” ethnic homelands around the North Atlantic in “Beyond Nations: Evolving Homelands in the North Atlantic World, 1400-2000.” The event begins at noon Sept. 30 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch.

Sounds of India: The Meadows School of the Arts presents a concert of classical South Indian music with percussionist and Grammy Award nominee Poovalur Srinivasan and his group, Karnatic Kutcherri, at noon Sept. 30 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. The show is part of the Expanding Your Horizons Brown Bag Concert Series. Admission is free; bring your lunch. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Robert Moyzis to give 2009 Collegium da Vinci Public Lecture

Biological chemist Robert MoyzisRecent research that suggests human culture may have had a profound effect on shaping our DNA will be the topic of the Collegium da Vinci’s 2009 Darwin’s Evolving Legacy Public Lecture. Robert Moyzis, professor of biological chemistry at the University of California-Irvine, will address the question, “Are Humans Still Evolving?” at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in the Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Center.

Moyzis’ work focuses on human DNA, particularly the tips of human chromosomes, known as telomeres. His mapping of these areas as part of the Human Genome Project revealed that these telomeres – previously thought to be “junk DNA” – contain active sequences that may play important roles in cancer and aging. His most recent research suggests that as much as 10 percent of the human genome is still evolving and that the process may actually have accelerated during the past several thousand years.

In 1993, Moyzis won the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science for “distinguished contributions to the field of molecular genetics,” citing research that “point[s] to the existence of a new type of DNA code that is ‘structural’ in nature and is shared by the DNA of many other organisms.”

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Collegium da Vinci office, 214-768-1177.

Learn more at the Collegium da Vinci homepage

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2009

Illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250, from SMU's Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible CollectionGood books: Nearly 60 remarkable bibles – including Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and early American editions – are on view in “The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection” in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library, through Dec. 11, 2009. For more information call 214-768-3483 or visit the Bridwell Library website. (Right, a page from an illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250.)

Patriotic pride: SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2009 at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution and the traveling Liberty Bell will be present, and cake and punch will be served. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 214-768-4498.

Remembering a pioneer: Author and editor Charlotte Whaley will give a lecture on her latest work – a collection of memoirs by Alice Marriott, one of the first women in the Southwest to hold an advanced degree in anthropology and who studied Southwestern American Indian culture. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by a book signing for Alice Marriott Remembered. All events take place in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and DeGolyer Library. For more information, call 214-768-3225.

“Holocaust Legacies” lecture: Georgetown University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Beauchamp, senior research scholar with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and primary author of the Belmont Report, will participate in a lecture and panel discussion, “From the Nuremburg Code to the Belmont Report and the Final Rule: The Protection of Human Research Subjects in the 21st Century,” Sept. 17 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program as part of “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point.” Free and open to the public.

'Galileo Goes to Jail' book coverStanton Sharp Lecture: Author, editor and historian Ronald L. Numbers (Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion), Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss “Anti-Evolution in America: From Creation Science to Intelligent Design” Sept. 18 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 3:30 p.m., lecture at 4 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History, Dedman College. For more information, contact the history department, 214-768-2967, or visit its Sharp Lectures web page.

Fun and games: Prospective students can explore The Guildhall at SMU during its Fall 2009 open house, 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 19 at the SMU-in-Plano campus, 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2. Activities include food and games for all ages and a bounce house for kids, plus LEGO Star Wars for gaming enthusiasts. RSVP online at the Guildhall website.

Tate-Willson Lecture: Nigel Biggar – Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology and director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at the University of Oxford – will discuss “Behaving in Public: Christian Ethics in a Polyglot Secularity” at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 in 106 Prothro Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Graduate Program in Religious Studies Office, 214-768-2432. Presented by the Graduate Program in Religious Studies and cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 9, 2009

'Darwin's Evolving Legacy' logoThe joy of science: SMU professors from multiple schools and disciplines will participate in a faculty symposium on “The Year of Darwin” 9:30 a.m.-noon Sept. 12 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Participants include David Meltzer and Ronald Wetherington, Anthropology, Dedman College; Larry Ruben and John Wise, Biological Sciences, Dedman College; Louis Jacobs, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College; and Rhonda Blair, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts. Presented by the Office of the Provost, Dedman College, Meadows School of the Arts, and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. For more information, contact Pia Vogel, 214-768-1790, or visit the “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” homepage.

Adobe churchInterdisciplinary Dialogue: The interplay between basic social science research and action research will be at the center of “Research on Latino Religious Topics: A Challenge to Scholars,” moderated by Harold Recinos, professor of church and society, Perkins School of Theology; and Hector Rivera, assistant professor, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. The event begins Sept. 16 in the Prothro Hall Refectory (Room 104) with a light dinner at 6:30 p.m. and discussion 7-8:30 p.m.

Going green: The City of Dallas and more than 20 vendors will present sustainable products and other green solutions as part of SMU’s first Sustainability Fair for students, faculty and staff. The event takes place 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Hors d’oeuvres will be served along with tea and lemonade. Presented by SMU Purchasing.

Recycling logoGodbey Lecture Series: Associate Professor of Hispanic American Literature Francisco Morán of Dedman College will discuss “Why Poetry Matters: Playing ‘Ajedrez’ (Chess) with Language” Sept. 17 at Maggiano’s NorthPark Center. The lecture begins at 11 a.m., followed by lunch at noon. The cost is $45 for Godbey members, $65 for non-members. Register online or call 214-768-2532.

Early editions highlight DeGolyer’s ‘Origin’ exhibition

Early editions of Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species'When Charles Darwin‘s On the Origin of Species was first published in 1859, only 1,250 copies of the book were printed. Subsequent printings were not much larger, 3,000 at the most, despite five additional editions published through 1872.

The collections of SMU’s DeGolyer Library include a copy of each of the six editions published in Darwin’s lifetime, as well as the numerous impressions made for each edition – including more than 60 volumes printed through 1890. Those editions form the nucleus of a major exhibit about the father of evolution.

“On the Origin of Species: Texts and Contexts for Charles Darwin’s Great Work” will appear Sept. 8-Dec. 9, 2009, as part of “Darwin’s Evolving Legacy,” SMU’s yearlong celebration honoring both the 150th anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s seminal text and the 200th anniversary of his birth. The exhibition will be accompanied by comments from the popular press of the time, as well as other books and publications by Darwin, including his famous The Voyage of the Beagle.

“The Charles Darwin collection is one of the hidden jewels in the library. While we are best known, perhaps, for our Western Americana and railroadiana, our books and journals in the history of science are extraordinary,” says Russell Martin, DeGolyer Library director.

“We hope the exhibit will be a visual feast,” Martin adds. “We”ll get to see how the book itself evolved over time – text, bindings – and how Darwin fit into the scientific and popular literature of his day. Many of the books are annotated by former readers, so we can see the notes his contemporaries made.”

Read more about the exhibition in the Spring 2009 issue of Annotations, the newsletter of SMU’s Central University Libraries.

Find more Darwin Year events
Visit DeGolyer Library online

Load More Posts