Darwin Payne

Calendar Highlights: Mustang Must-do’s for April 22, 2016

Korean ‘Comfort Women’ Presentation: In a rare U.S. appearance, two surviving Kang Il-chul, a former Korean sex slavevictims of Japanese military sexual slavery will be at SMU on Friday, April 22, for the Embrey Human Rights Program’s “Evening With Kang Il-Chul and Lee Ok-Seon,” held in partnership with Seoul, South Korea’s House of Sharing, an assisted living home where Il-Chul and Ok-Seon and five others find support. The free public event will begin with a 6:30 p.m. reception featuring Korean food and dance tributes, followed by a 7:15 p.m. discussion in McCord Auditorium, Room 306 of Dallas Hall, 3225 University Blvd.

Cézanne Quartet: Join the Cézanne Quartet, Meadows’ Peak Fellowship Ensemble-in-Residence, on Saturday, April 23 as they perform the two quartets by Janacek and Beethoven’s “Rasumovsky” Quartet, op. 59, no. 2. Since winning Second Place Ensemble in the Senior Division of the Coltman Chamber Music Competition, the musicians have collaborated with cellist Andrés Díaz and violist Matt Albert of SMU, performed with the Bridge the Gap Chamber Players and Open Classical Artist Series and participated in the McGill International String Quartet Academy. The free public event will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium.

Heavenly Images: “When I consider your heavens….” The words of Psalm 8 serve as the basis for the final choral concert of the season on Thursday, April 28 at 7:30 p.m. From Tarik O’Regan’s The Ecstasies Above, a setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s Israfel, to Franz Joseph Haydn’s celebratory chorus The Heavens Are Telling, you will spend the evening gazing at a myriad of heavenly images. The Meadows choirs are honored to be joined in this performance by the young artists of Flower Mound High School. The concert is free and open to the public and will be held in Caruth Auditorium.

Tables of Content invitationFriends of the Library: The Friends of the SMU Libraries will host the 16th annual Tables of Content fundraiser at 6 p.m., Saturday, April 30, in the newly renovated Fondren Foundation Centennial Reading Room in Fondren Library, 6414 Robert S. Hyer Lane.

The event will include the presentation of the 7th annual Literati Award to Darwin Payne ’68, SMU centennial historian and professor emeritus of communications. The event also will feature a reception honoring the “Top 10 Haute Young Authors” as well as 19 table hosts who will lead discussions on a variety of topics with guests at the dinner.

Tickets to Tables of Content are $150. Sponsorship packages with special benefits and seating for the event are available from $1,000 to $10,000. For additional information, call (214) 768-3225 or visit smu.edu/friends.

 

Calendar Highlights: Mustang Must-do’s for April 15, 2016

Sing Song: Sing Song, the annual musical theater performance competition for SMU students hosted by SMU Program Council, is Friday, April 15 at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The performances are centered on this year’s theme of “Twisted Tales” – featuring an updated take on traditional fairy tales. Tickets are available online.

Campaign Finale: SMU gathers Friday, April 15 to unveil a new campus monument recognizing major donors and to dedicate the new Crain Family Centennial Promenade, it will mark the finale to the University’s historic $1.15 billion Second Century Campaign. The community is invited to attend the ceremony at 6 p.m. on the South Plaza, near the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, followed by a festive celebration.

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Inside SMU: Inside SMU, scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 16 in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, is a full morning of topical discussions delivered by SMU faculty and students. The plenary session at 9 a.m. features Darwin Payne ’68, SMU historian and professor emeritus of communications, sharing “Ten Stories You Should Know about SMU.”

Meadows World Music Ensemble: Take a musical trip around the world with the World Music Ensemble spring concert. The performances will feature Arabic, Celtic, Indian and Greek music, and much more. Special guest artist Poovalur Sriji, a world-renowned virtuoso on the mridangam (Indian barrel drum), will perform his composition Jamming Saints. The event will be held on Sunday, April 17 from 6-8:30 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre and is free and open to the public.

Christianity in 2050: The Department of Religious Studies presents Philip Jenkins, Distinguished Professor of History at the Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University. On Tuesday, April 19 from 4-5 p.m. in Dedman Life Sciences Building, room 131. Dr. Jenkins will discuss revolutionary religious change worldwide. For centuries, Christianity has had its strongest centers in Europe and North America, but the world now finds itself in rapid transformation. Christianity is growing rapidly in the Global South, especially in Africa and Asia, while traditional Western religion is under threat from secularization. Meanwhile, Christians find themselves in competition with other religions, including Islam. So what will Christianity look like in 2050? The event is free and open to the public.

Titans: Author Leila Meacham will give a free lecture and book signing for her new novel, Titans, on Thursday, April 21 in Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. An author’s reception will be held from 1-11:30 a.m. Tickets to the reception can be purchased for $30 (includes signed book and lunch). A complimentary light buffet will be served at 11:30 a.m. The lecture and book signing will begin at noon. No RSVP is required for the lecture.

SMU celebrates Founders’ Day Weekend 2016 April 15-16

Peruna mascot at SMU Founders Day 2015SMU Founders’ Day Weekend will kick-start the University’s second century April 15-16, 2016 with a celebration of renovated library facilities, a new book on SMU history, the dedication of a new campus walkway, and a Mustang-sized finale to the Second Century Campaign.

Saturday’s community activities will include faculty talks at Inside SMU, opportunities to explore and create at the Meadows Museum, and an afternoon of fandom and Mustang football.

> Read the full story from SMU News

“We look forward to celebrating our beginnings at Founders Day each year, but in 2016 we also celebrate a very happy ending – the April 15 finale of the $1.15 billion fundraising campaign that has changed the trajectory of SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “All of the opportunities the campaign has opened for SMU ultimately become community assets that we want to share.  We hope our North Texas neighbors will come explore the Hilltop and enjoy Community Day with us on April 16.”

FRIDAY, APRIL 15

• SMU will celebrate the renovation of Fondren Library, including the Fondren Foundation Centennial Reading Room, at 12:30 p.m. Friday.

• A 1 p.m. open house will honor the release of the new book from SMU historian Darwin Payne ’68One Hundred Years on the Hilltop: The Centennial History of Southern Methodist University.  Signed copies are available for order online and will be shipped to purchasers after Founders’ Day Weekend.

• At 6 p.m., the University will celebrate the campaign finale on the South Plaza of the Hughes-Trigg Student Center with a salute to the campaign’s major and leadership donors, the dedication of the Crain Family Centennial Promenade and the unveiling of a campaign major donor monument, including plaques listing major donors to the Second Century Campaign. During the reception that follows, guests can stroll the promenade and view their engraved pavers.

Read some of the stories behind the Crain Family Centennial Promenade bricks

• The day ends with Sing Song, the annual musical theater performance competition for SMU students hosted by SMU Program Council.  Scheduled for 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium, the performances are centered on this year’s theme of “Twisted Tales.”  Tickets are available online.

> Celebrate Peruna’s Birthday during Founders’ Day Weekend 2016, Friday, April 15

SATURDAY, APRIL 16 – SMU COMMUNITY DAY

All SMU Community day activities are open to the public.

Guitarist in Meadows Museum, SMU Founders' Day 2015Inside SMU, scheduled for 8:30 a.m.-noon in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, is a full morning of topical discussions delivered by SMU faculty and students. The plenary session at 9 a.m. features Darwin Payne ’68, SMU historian and professor emeritus of communications, sharing “Ten Stories You Should Know about SMU.”

Community Day at the Meadows Museum is from 10-1 p.m. and will enable visitors to explore its Salvador Dali exhibit, as well as participate in special activities for children.

SMU Athletics hosts afternoon events at Gerald J. Ford Stadium: Mustang Fan Fair begins at noon with inflatables and food trucks, followed by the SMU Spring Football Game at 1 p.m.

See the full schedule and register for activities

— Kimberly Cobb

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 17, 2014

BwjF4ZXCEAAqvAlRonald Reagan and the Struggle Over Apartheid: As part of the Presidential Forum lecture series, the SMU Center for Presidential History presents “Ronald Reagan and the Struggle Over Apartheid.” Co-sponsored by the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s Seminar “Global Africa: Between Intervention and Engagement,” the event will feature a discussion between two distinguished guests: Rozell W. “Prexy” Nesbitt and Piero Gleijeses. The event will take place Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 5-7 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Register for the forum online.

Professor Emeritus Darwin Payne Book Signing: DeGolyer Library and Friends of the SMU Libraries presents Professor Emeritus Darwin Payne and his new book, No Small Dreams: J. Erik Jonsson – Texas Visionary. Payne shares the biography of J. Erik Jonsson, the industrialist who led Texas Instruments during its rise to become one of the nation’s leading electronics firms. The event will take place Thursday, Sept. 18, 6 p.m. in DeGolyer Library. For additional information or to RSVP, e-mail DeGolyer Library.

Economics Seminar Series: The Department of Economics presents Denis Nekipelov from the Departments of Economics and Computer Science at the University of Virginia. Dr. Nekipelov will share his recent work on advertising Friday, Sept. 19, 2 p.m. in 303 Umphrey Lee. For more information about the seminar series, click here.

Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 11.25.52 AM Happiness Symposia: Continuing its two-month series on “Happiness: What Makes you Smile?,” the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute presents Peter Huang from the University of Colorado Law School Friday, Sept. 19. Dr. Huang will share how happiness research can inform legal policy, as well as improve legal education and practice. The event will take place in McCord Auditorium at 5 p.m. For more information, e-mail Elizabeth Fielding.

Friday Night Stampede: Celebrate the 100th season of SMU Athletics and the first home football game by joining SMU for a special Friday Night Stampede on Sept. 19. Put on your red spirit attire and head out for the dedication of the new Mustang Band Hall at 7 p.m. Stick around for a block party starting at 7:30 p.m. on Mustang Mall. Then at 8:30 p.m. enjoy a Mustang Band concert and pep rally Doak Walker Plaza. For more information, visit the SMU Stampede homepage.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Book Signing: Senator Kirsten Gillibrand presents Off the Sidelines: Raise Your Voice, Change the World Sunday, Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Theater. Off the Sidelines is New York Senator Gillibrand’s call to action encouraging every woman and girl to make their voice heard on issues they care about. This event is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase.

World Peace Day: Celebrate World Peace Day with live music, poetry, food and special guest speakers from Human Rights Initiative, Dallas Peace Center, and other local organizations. The event will take place Sunday, Sept. 21, 4-7 p.m. on the Quad in front of Dallas HallFor more information, e-mail Amber Jackson.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 3, 2013

Higher Education Colloquium: The Department of Education Policy and Leadership presents a panel on the impact of changes in national and state policy on college student success and financial aid. The panel includes Don Heller, Professor and Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University, Michael McLendon, Professor and Associate Dean of the Simmons School of Education at Southern Methodist University, Laura Perna, Professor at University of Pennsylvania, and Scott Thomas, Professor and Dean of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University. Michael Harris, Associate Professor of the Simmons School of Education at Southern Methodist University, will moderate the panel. The event is on Thursday, Oct. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in McCord Auditorium; registration is required.

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Family Weekend 2013: SMU families will arrive at the Hilltop for Family Weekend 2103, Oct. 4-6. The theme is SMU: Where Dreams Come True, and the weekend is full of activities from the Annual Taste of Dallas Dinner on Friday to the football game against Rutgers on Saturday. Read all the details here. Pony up!

MVP: The Meadows Virtuosi Players was formed in 2012 to showcase outstanding meadows students performing side by side with their faculty colleagues. Faculty artists Andrés Díaz and Matt Albert started the program and will perform alongside Ekaterina Gumenyuk and Hando Nahkur Saturday, Oct. 5. Gumenyuk and Nahkur were the first two pianists accepted into the Meadows Artist Diploma Program. The concert is at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium and is free and open to the public.

2013 Sammons Lecture explores how JFK’s death changed media

Official portrait of President John F. Kennedy

An official portrait of John F. Kennedy used in a memorial folio. From the Stanley Marcus Collection, used with permission of DeGolyer Library, SMU.

A panel of distinguished Texas journalists, including a longtime SMU professor, will share their insights during the 14th annual Rosine Smith Sammons Lecture in Media Ethics.

The program marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy with a special presentation, “How the JFK Assassination Changed North Texas Media.”

Legendary Dallas journalist Hugh Aynesworth will introduce and moderate a panel of journalists who covered the historic events of November 1963, including Bob Huffaker, S. Griffin Singer and SMU Professor Emeritus of Journalism Darwin Payne.

The discussion begins at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The event is free; however, tickets are required and must be reserved in advance by calling the Meadows Ticket Office at 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

The Sammons Lecture Series is presented by the Division of Journalism in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

> More on the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination: smu.edu/jfk

Hugh Aynesworth has been a reporter since 1948 and is widely considered the journalistic authority on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. As a reporter for The Dallas Morning News, he was an eyewitness to the assassination and covered every major event related to it, including the capture of Lee Harvey Oswald and his murder two days later by Jack Ruby. He is the author of November 22, 1963: Witness to History, published to mark the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination.

Bob Huffaker, a reporter for KRLD and CBS, broadcast the JFK motorcade, the Parkland vigil and the Oswald shooting. He also interviewed Oswald’s mother and covered Jack Ruby’s trial. The Radio Television News Directors Association awarded his KRLD team its top honor for spot reporting. Huffaker became an English professor, then a Texas Monthly editor. He is a co-author (with his colleagues Wes Wise, Bill Mercer and George Phenix) of When the News Went Live, which next week is being published in a 50th anniversary edition.

Darwin Payne taught journalism at SMU for 30 years and is now professor emeritus. His career in journalism began as a reporter for the Fort Worth Press, and at the time of the Kennedy assassination he was a reporter for The Dallas Times-Herald. He has written several books on Dallas history, as well as biographies of writers Owen Wister and Frederick Lewis Allen, U.S. Judge Sarah T. Hughes, and Dallas’ first African-American judge, Louis A. Bedford Jr. He is the author of In Honor of the Mustangs, the centennial history of SMU athletics, and currently is writing the centennial history of SMU.

S. Griffin (Griff) Singer has devoted almost 60 years to journalism, in practice and as an educator. He retired from the University of Texas School of Journalism in 2003 but still is active part-time; seven of his former students have won Pulitzer Prizes. As a reporter and editor, he has worked at the Arlington Citizen-Journal, The Houston Chronicle and the San Antonio Light. A Dallas native, Singer was an assistant city editor at The Dallas Morning News at the time of the JFK assassination and the trial of Jack Ruby.

> Read more from the SMU Meadows News site
> Find a full calendar of SMU-sponsored events commemorating the JFK 50th anniversary

Dallas Hall celebrates 100 years on the Hilltop

Historic photo of Dallas Hall under construction

Dallas Hall, under construction. Photo courtesy of the SMU Archives.

On a chilly Thanksgiving Day in 1912, several thousand people gathered on a hill six miles from downtown Dallas. They had traveled by car and chartered train to celebrate the laying of the cornerstone of Dallas Hall, an event The Dallas Morning News described as “a day of jubilation.”

SMU celebrated the centennial of the laying of the Dallas Hall cornerstone Nov. 28, 2012, at a ceremony for the Dallas Hall Society in the Rotunda of Dallas Hall. The Dallas Hall Society recognizes those who contribute to SMU’s future through planned gifts.

In a 30-day countdown that began Homecoming weekend, alumni, students, faculty and staff signed giant Dallas Hall birthday cards and enjoyed birthday cupcakes.

For nearly 100 years, SMU’s elegant first building has served as a symbol of the University, a standard of its classic collegiate Georgian style, home to intellectual discourse for generations of students, and center of SMU’s liberal arts tradition, now Dedman College. Named in honor of the Dallas citizens whose contributions funded the building, Dallas Hall also serves as a symbol of the close relationship the University shares with the city.

Darwin Payne, SMU journalism professor emeritus and noted historian of Dallas, wrote and presented a brief history of Dallas Hall and its place in SMU’s founding at the anniversary celebration, excerpted below:

[A] Southwestern University professor had asked [SMU’s first president, Robert Stewart] Hyer if he truly thought the Methodist church could build a “real” university in Dallas. Hyer had answered: “Yes, but it will just about kill the man who does it. Nevertheless, I am willing to try. I know my limitations—I am not a money raiser. I also know my qualifications. I know how to select a faculty, and a great faculty makes a great school. Therefore, if the money is provided, I believe I can do the job.”

[…]

Precious few of the young students who arrived in 1915 for the beginning of classes – numbering 706 by the end of the first academic year – had ever seen such a building with such massive columns, its beautiful dome, and classic proportions. Their letters home and the oral histories they later gave provide unmistakable evidence of its tremendous impact.

It was a grand time, too, for SMU and for Dallas Hall and for the city of Dallas. So much excitement. So much promise. So much to do. And so much accomplished since then in these hundred years in a campus that now has more than a hundred buildings. But Dallas Hall, as we can see, is as beautiful and inspiring as it was then! It stands as a remarkable testament to the wisdom and forward-thinking of President Hyer, trustees, architects, and many others.

Written by Nancy George

> Find the full story, complete text of Payne’s remarks and historic photos at SMU News

SMU professor emeritus Darwin Payne gives a centennial history of Mustang sports

Book cover of 'In Honor of the Mustangs'As SMU celebrates the centennial of its founding in 1911 and opening in 1915, the University also is marking 100 years of achievements in athletics through a recently released book, In Honor of the Mustangs.

The first comprehensive history of SMU athletics showcases exploits on the gridiron, from the football team’s infamous 146-3 loss to the Rice Owls in 1916 to its 45-10 victory over Nevada in the 2009 Hawaii Bowl. Also highlighted are achievements in swimming, basketball, volleyball, track and field, cross country, tennis, baseball, and equestrian competition.

The book also looks at athletics in the context of the history of SMU and American higher education in general.

In Honor of the Mustangs was written by professor emeritus of communications and SMU centennial historian Darwin Payne ’68. Photo editor Gerry York ’58, curator of SMU’s Heritage Hall, selected the 650 photographs to illustrate the sports history.

Payne, who received an M.A. in history from SMU and a Ph.D. in American civilization from UT-Austin in 1973, taught journalism at the University for 30 years. He has written extensively about Dallas history and is the author of numerous books, including his most recent, Quest for Justice, a biography of Louis A. Bedford Jr. (SMU Press, 2009).

Payne says that although he had known about SMU athletics and been a sports fan all his life, “I was surprised at the national prominence SMU football teams achieved in the 1920s because of coach Ray Morrison,” Payne says. “The teams’ reliance on the forward pass became a national sensation, popularizing it as an offensive weapon, and SMU was perhaps the first Southwest Conference team to schedule significant intersectional games.

“Although football suffered after the ‘death penalty,’ other SMU sports teams generally thrived, and together they provided the University with one of the best all-round sports programs in the nation for private universities. There were many prominent athletes through the years who largely have been forgotten, and I hope this book will help bring them the attention they deserve.”

The editorial advisory group included Roman Kupchynsky II ’80, president of the Lettermen’s Association; Chuck Hixson ’70, former SMU quarterback and president-elect of the Lettermen’s Association; C. Paul Rogers III, professor of law and faculty athletics representative for SMU since 1987; Joan Gosnell, University archivist; and Russell L. Martin III ’78, director of DeGolyer Library.

Published jointly by the Lettermen’s Association and SMU’s DeGolyer Library, In Honor of the Mustangs costs $55 per copy, including tax and shipping. Make checks payable to “DeGolyer Library, SMU” and note “sports book” on the memo line. Fill out and return the order form (PDF format) to DeGolyer Library, SMU, Dallas TX 75275-0396.

For more information, contact Pam Anderson, 214-768-0829. Copies also are sold at Culwell & Son, across Hillcrest Avenue from SMU’s main campus. For more information, call 214-522-7000.

Written by Susan White for SMU Magazine

> Read the full article from SMU News
> Learn more about the book at the DeGolyer Library website
> Visit SMU Magazine online

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 9, 2010

Santuario de Chimayo, TaosTaos Open House: SMU-in-Taos will give out application forms, program information and Valentine treats at its annual Valentine’s Day Open House 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 10 in Room 338, Blanton Student Services Building.

Watching your heart health: North Texas cardiologist Dr. Sarah Samaan (The Smart Woman’s Guide to Heart Health) will talk about cardiac health factors ranging from high blood pressure and diabetes to social networks and sleep during the first event in SMU Human Resources‘ 2010 Heart Health Month Lunch & Learn series. Bring your lunch and your questions for the seminar, scheduled for noon-1 p.m. Feb. 16 in the Hughes-Trigg Forum. Attendees will earn 1 Wellpower Body credit.

'Quest for Justice' book cover'Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Clements Center Fellow Stephanie Lewthwaite will speak on “John Candelario: Modernism in Black and White” noon-1 p.m. Feb. 17 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch.

Expanding Your Horizons Brown Bag Concert: SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts presents the Iranian traditional and folk music of the Alhon Ensemble at noon Feb. 17 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. Bring your lunch.

Faculty lecture and book signing: SMU Professor Emeritus of Communications Darwin Payne will discuss and sign copies of his latest book, Quest for Justice: Louis A. Bedford Jr. and the Struggle for Equal Rights in Texas (SMU Press, 2009), Feb. 18 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by signing. The event is free and open to the public – register online or get more information from the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, 214-768-3684.

Jim Schutze to speak in Retired Faculty Association lecture

Jim SchutzeAuthor and Dallas Observer columnist Jim Schutze will share his views on everything from City Hall to the Trinity River toll road with the Retired Faculty Association Oct. 13. “Inside Dallas: A Muckraker’s Paradise” begins at 4 p.m. in Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum.

A former Dallas bureau chief for the Houston Chronicle, Schutze is familiar to Dallasites for his Observer work focusing on city politics. His reporting has earned three Unity Awards, a national prize for journalism on racial issues.

Schutze is also the author of several nonfiction books on true murder cases; two have been finalists for the Edgar Allan Poe Award presented by the Mystery Writers of America. His 1998 work, Bully: A True Story of High School Revenge, in 2001 became a major motion picture directed by Larry Clark.

The afternoon begins with a wine and cheese reception from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Meadows Museum’s Jones Great Hall. The event is sponsored by the SMU Retired Faculty Association, with the support of the Provost’s Office.

For more information, contact Darwin Payne, Retired Faculty Association president.

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