Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

Daniel Shuman

Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

SMU Law Professor Daniel ShumanDaniel Shuman, M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, will be remembered for his work as a renowned legal scholar, but he was much more to his students.

“He was a caring mentor to so many of us, right up to even the last week of his life,” says Clarence Wilson, who recently achieved a scholarship with Shuman’s help. Shuman, 62, died Tuesday, April 26, 2011 of multiple system atrophy, a rare neurological disorder.

SMU’s Health Law Association (HLA) has announced that it will raise money for a plaque to serve as a lasting tribute to Shuman’s dedication.

Shuman was the inaugural M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law at the law school and a member of the faculty for more than 33 years teaching torts, evidence, law and social science and mental health law.

“The Law School family has suffered a great loss and our thoughts and prayers are with the Shuman family right now,” says Law Dean John B. Attanasio.

Shuman was a nationally and internationally respected scholar in two separate fields, says colleague and HLA advisor Thomas Mayo, associate professor of law. “Early in his career he did groundbreaking empirical research on the attitudes and behaviors of juries, and he followed that with the best research and writing on law and psychiatry anyone has ever done. His productivity and quality were at the highest levels for an incredible three decades.”

Earlier this year, Shuman received the 2011 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The recognition – shared with psychiatrist Liza Gold – honors their book, Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace: Model, Process, and Analysis (Springer, 2009), as an “outstanding contribution to the literature of forensic psychiatry.” The award will be presented during the APA’s annual meeting May 14-18 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

“Institutionally, he shaped the present and future course of the law school as the long-time chair of the faculty appointments committee, and he was extremely helpful to the development of our young faculty,” Mayo adds. “Students adored him.”

One of those is Juris Doctor candidate Isaac Haas, who says, “Professor Shuman was passionate about teaching his students to look beyond mere memorization and understanding of the law and consider the consequences of the decisions we make as a community about right and wrong. And while he was a brilliant scholar and writer, what set him apart as a teacher was the interest that he took in me and so many others.

“Very rarely would I ever leave a conversation with Professor Shuman without him asking about my other classes, job prospects, wife or son,” Haas says. “I am incredibly grateful for the time I spent with him, and with his wife, Emily, as a student, teaching assistant and friend.”

The family has requested that memorials be made to the Texas Voice Project for Parkinson Disease.

To contribute to the HLA’s memorial gift for Shuman, contact Alex Berk.

Written by Denise Gee

May 2, 2011|News|

For the Record: Feb. 8, 2011

'Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace' cover, Daniel Shuman-Liza GoldDaniel Shuman, Dedman School of Law, has received the 2011 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The recognition, shared with psychiatrist Liza Gold, honors their book, Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace: Model, Process, and Analysis (Springer, 2009), as an “outstanding contribution to the literature of forensic psychiatry.” The award will be presented during the APA’s annual meeting May 14-18 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Anthony Cortese, Sociology, Dedman College, moderated the Roundtable Writer’s Breakfast, “The 14th Amendment: Race, Immigration and Transformation in the 21st Century,” presented by the Black Academy of Arts and Letters Jan. 8, 2011 at the Dallas Convention Center. Read coverage by Norma Adams-Wade of The Dallas Morning News.

Gary Swaim, Master of Liberal Studies Program, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has written a play, Morphine, that has been accepted for a full production at the Arts Theatre Center in Plano during its 2012 season.

In addition, he has been invited to present poetry at the opening presentation of the newly installed grand painting of The Resurrection at the Dallas Museum of Biblical Arts in Spring 2011. On Good Friday (April 22) and Easter Sunday (April 24), he will read his original poetry, Cloud of Witnesses, providing a historical and cultural sweep of ancient Hebrew and Christian figures.

Taylor Reed, a sophomore communication studies major in Meadows School of the Arts, is one of five national finalists in the PRWeek Student of the Year competition. The winner will be announced at the annual PRWeek Awards dinner and ceremony March 10, 2011, in New York City. The competition invites undergraduates from any academic area to create a communications campaign around a brand or company that demonstrate the student’s writing ability, planning skills, strategic approach and creativity. Reed completed the campaign for SanDisk Corporation, the global leader in flash memory cards, as part of required coursework for an Introduction to Public Relations class taught by Christy Baily-Byers, APR.

'Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road' by Johan ElverskogJohan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College, has received a CHOICE Award – presented annually by the Association of College & Research Libraries – for his latest book. Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road (University of Pennsylvania Press) was recognized as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2010 in the religious books category. In presenting the Outstanding Academic Title awards, the editors consider “overall excellence in presentation and scholarship, importance relative to other literature in the field, distinction as a first treatment of a given subject in book or electronic form, originality or uniqueness of treatment, value to undergraduate students and importance in building undergraduate library collections.” Read more from SMU News.

February 8, 2011|For the Record|
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