Creative Time, Meadows School release recommendations for fostering arts in Dallas

Creative Time

Creative Time, Meadows School release recommendations for fostering arts in Dallas

Creative Time logoA series of recommendations for fostering the arts in Dallas has been released by SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and Creative Time, a New York-based public arts organization. In October 2009 Creative Time received one of the inaugural two Meadows Prize artist residency awards from the Meadows School.

Creative Time’s residency has taken the form of a yearlong study of the Dallas art community to identify strengths and potential areas for growth. During the course of three weeklong visits to Dallas over the past year, Creative Time’s team met with a wide range of members of the art community, including artists, curators, collectors, gallery owners, visual and performing arts organization leaders, school administrators, philanthropists, writers, community organizers and city officials.

“Our goal was to begin an inclusive dialogue about where Dallas could focus energies to nurture its artistic life, a conversation that we hope will continue long after our residency has ended and will lead to new initiatives, policies and opportunities for artists,” said Creative Time President and Artistic Director Anne Pasternak.

Dallas skylineThe group identified 13 key elements necessary for the Dallas art community to thrive. Many are already in place and working effectively, while others are lacking or nonexistent, Pasternak said. For each element, Creative Time developed several recommendations to further strengthen programs and structures and to create new opportunities.

The 13 key elements are:

  • A sustainable artist community and opportunities for live/work space
  • Cultural institutions with international reach, innovative programs and historically relevant collections
  • Great patrons who support the creation, presentation and acquisition of art
  • Mid-sized and small art spaces that support the creation of new and experimental work by local and international artists
  • Skilled and visionary arts leaders in institutions big and small
  • Excellent contemporary art galleries with international reach
  • Residency programs for national and international artists to create in Dallas
  • Master of Fine Arts programs to train and attract artists
  • Arts education in Dallas public schools
  • Public art to engage broad audiences and activate public spaces
  • Engaged audiences
  • Experienced art writers featured daily in primary news media
  • Civic championing of the arts through policies and urban planning

A conversation about Creative Time’s study and the Dallas art community is now open to audiences online with D Magazine‘s FrontRow. Creative Time encourages everyone to read the report, consider its recommendations, and post reactions on the website at frontrow.dmagazine.com/creativetime.

Owen Arts Center, Meadows School of the ArtsIn addition, as a follow-up to the report, the Meadows School will host a public symposium titled “The Freedom of the City: Models of Urban Engagement and Creativity in the 21st Century” 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 9 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center. The event will explore new models of public art practice in the urban environment. Participants will include socially engaged artists such as Rick Lowe, creator of Houston’s Project Row Houses, and Tom Finkelpearl, executive director of the Queens Museum of Art, as well as members of Creative Time and prominent Dallas community builders. Admission is free, and no tickets are required. For more information, call the Division of Art at 214-768-2489.

“This is an important moment for Dallas,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “We’ve built wonderful new performance spaces and we are clearly ambitious in our desire to be a major cultural center. The report highlights the existence of terrific collectors, patrons, artists, institutions and partnerships, but also gives us a fresh perspective on what Dallas needs to do to fulfill its promise. Mostly, we hope this report, and the symposium to follow, will serve as the beginning of a conversation for how we can make the Dallas arts community the best in the world.”

> Learn about Creative Time’s 58 ideas for action at the SMU News site
> Read the full Creative Time report (PDF format)
> Join the conversation at D Magazine‘s FrontRow
> Visit Creative Time online

February 9, 2011|News|

Two winners announced for inaugural Meadows Prize

eighth blackbirdGrammy-winning new music ensemble eighth blackbird (right) and New York-based public arts organization Creative Time have been selected by SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts as recipients of the inaugural 2009-2010 Meadows Prize, a new international arts residency.

The announcement was made Oct. 14 at the “Act 3, Scene I” gala at the AT&T Performing Arts Center by José Bowen, dean of the Meadows School.

“The opening of the AT&T Performing Arts Center is making a huge impact on the world’s perception of Dallas as a great city for the arts,” said Bowen. “To help make Dallas a great cultural capital, we must also become known as a center for the creation of new works, building a community that nurtures its own and tolerates artistic risk the same way we embrace entrepreneurial risk. To further that goal, in partnership with the Dallas arts community, the new Meadows Prize will bring artists with an international reputation to Dallas each year to produce an artistic legacy for the city.”

The prize includes housing for a one-to-three-month residency in Dallas, transportation expenses, studio/office space and project costs, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

eighth blackbird formed in 1996 when its members were students at Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Since then, they have appeared in concert halls and festivals worldwide; released four acclaimed CDs, including the Grammy-winning strange imaginary animals in 2008 (Best Chamber Music Performance); received numerous grants and awards; and commissioned and premiered new works by eminent composers, including Steven Reich’s Double Sextet, which won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize.

During their time in Dallas, eighth blackbird will introduce new music and provide workshops for chamber ensembles with the Meadows School and other local schools as well as the wider community. Their legacy for the city will be a curated music series in partnership with the Dallas Arts District.

Founded in New York in 1974, Creative Time has a history of commissioning, producing and presenting adventurous public artworks. During the 1980s and 90s it broadened the definitions of both art and public space, presenting projects on sites from billboards to landmark buildings to deli cups, and encouraging artists to address timely issues such as domestic violence, AIDS and racial inequality. Creative Time also promotes collaboration within the creative community, partnering with such organizations as Lincoln Center and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2007 Creative Time expanded to national and international projects, working with artists, sites and partners in cities such as New Orleans, Baltimore, Chicago and London. In 2008 Creative Time was hired by the city of Louisville to develop its first Public Art Master Plan.

Through the Meadows Prize, Creative Time’s consultants will make several extended trips to Dallas over a year’s period to develop recommendations for growing and nurturing the Dallas arts community. The group intends to lead discussions, identify stakeholders, and help participants agree on goals and a plan of action. The aim is to bring together artists, collectors, gallery owners, arts organizations, urban planners, schools and city officials to lay the preliminary groundwork for a process that will lead to a master plan for the arts in the city.

The new Meadows Prize replaces the Meadows Award, which was given annually from 1981 to 2003 to honor the accomplishments of an artist at the pinnacle of a distinguished career. The Meadows Prize will be presented each fall to up to four artists. Recipients must be pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile, active in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School: advertising, art, art history, arts administration, cinema-television, corporate communications, dance, journalism, music and theatre.

Above, eighth blackbird members (back row, left to right): Nicholas Photinos, cello; Tim Munro, flutes; Matthew Duvall, percussion; Michael J. Maccaferri, clarinets; (front row) Matt Albert, violin and viola; Lisa Kaplan, piano. Photo by Luke Ratray.

Read more about the selection committee and process from SMU News
Learn more about eighth blackbird
Visit the Creative Time website

October 20, 2009|News|
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