Meadows kicks off new community performance series in 2013-14

community programs

Meadows kicks off new community performance series in 2013-14

Meadows Symphony OrchestraSMU’s Meadows School of the Arts is transporting its art and music into the community as part of a new “Meadows Community Series,” which will present five events in diverse venues throughout Dallas over the fall and spring semesters.

The series launches with a concert by the Meadows Wind Ensemble at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13 in the new Dallas City Performance Hall. Other offerings will include concerts by the Meadows Symphony Orchestra and Meadows choirs, a creative take on Shakespeare at NorthPark Center, and a dance performance and children’s creative movement class at Klyde Warren Park.

The new series is part of Meadows’ ongoing initiative to engage the community with art, music, theatre, dance and more. Sam Holland, professor and director of the Division of Music at Meadows, says the series is about more than showcasing talented Meadows performers in new city locales; it’s also about inviting the audience members to have an aesthetic experience.

“People don’t come to concerts to learn something, or to be edified, or to be in the presence of greatness,” says Holland. “They come to feel something, to be moved by something greater than themselves. That is what the aesthetic experience is, and that is what we want to provide.”

Three of the events are ticketed, and two are free. Ticket prices range from $7-$13 and may be purchased at the door or online in advance at Vendini.com. For more information contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

> Find a full schedule of Meadows Community Series events at SMU News

September 11, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Imagining the energy future at Visioneering 2009

Visioneering 2009 presentation

More than 700 middle-school students from the North Texas area gathered in SMU’s Moody Coliseum to brainstorm the future of energy at Visioneering 2009 in February.

Seventy-five teams worked under the guidance of professional engineers to imagine their school in 2030, with traditional sources of energy no longer available. They made plans to create, deliver and store clean, sustainable power for their school’s computers, lights, heating and cooling systems as well as buses. Each team then presented its ideas before a panel of judges.

Visioneering, hosted annually by the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education in SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering, celebrates National Engineers Week by introducing young students to the field of engineering.

Watch local coverage on FOX 4 News

March 24, 2009|News|
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