Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2014

Comini Lecture Series

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2014

Plains Indians and Their Horses: The Clement Center for Southwest Studies presents “Rethinking Horses, Native Peoples and Colonialism in the North American Borderlands,” Wednesday, Jan. 29. The lecture will focus on a new approach to Plains Indians and horses; placing the Plains in a broader continental context. Thomas Andrews will give the talk; Andrews specializes in the social and environmental history of the Rocky Mountain West and received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The night will begin with a reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m. and book signing immediately following. The event is in DeGolyer Library and is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Image from ''FRANK HENDERSON'S DRAWING BOOK" via Clements Center

Image from ”FRANK HENDERSON’S DRAWING BOOK” via Clements Center

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Enacting the Archives, Discentering the Muses: Professor Walter Mignolo will speak at Meadows Museum on Thursday, Jan. 30 at 5:30 p.m. Mignolo makes the point that delinking and de-westernization are taking place in the sphere of museums and biennials; he will speak on three specific examples from which this theory stems. Mignolo received his Ph.D. from Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris and is now the William H. Wannamaker Professor of Literature at Duke University, holding joint appointments in cultural anthropology and Romance studies. Thursday’s lecture is part of the Comini Lecture Series and will be held in Bob Smith Auditorium.

A Night of Stravinsky: The Meadows Wind Ensemble invites you to a concert featuring four works by Stravinsky – one including performers from SMU’s Division of Dance and another starring Meadows faculty member and pianist Catharine Lysinger. The concert take place Friday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

January 29, 2014|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: March 27, 2013

Screen shot 2013-03-25 at 1.18.00 PMStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History presents “‘The Hispanic Challenge’ and the ‘Mexicanization’ of America” by Neil Foley, SMU’s Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History. Foley will focus on the rapid increase in the Hispanic population since the 1980s and the fear Americans hold that Hispanic immigration will be the end of America’s “core Anglo-Protestant culture.” The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, with a reception beforehand at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Please contact Mildred Pinkston for more information.

Comini Lecture: Susan Verdi Webster, Jane Williams Mahoney Professor of Art History and Studies at the College of William and Mary, will speak on “The Secret Lives of Buildings in Colonial Quito: People, Processes and Cultural Optics” at 5:30 p.m. Friday, March 29 in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum, Webster will discuss Andean and European perspectives on architectural production in colonial Quito, Ecuador, with the view that the way buildings are perceived within a historical context is based upon who is actually doing the looking. Learn about her unique approach to analyzing and understanding architectural production within colonial contexts at this event.

Happy Good Friday and Easter Weekend!

(Images c/o SMU) 

March 27, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2013

From Print to Icon/Icon to Print: On Thursday, Jan. 31, the Comini Lecture Series will explore the visual connections and identity of Mount Sinai and the Monastery of St. Catherine. During the 16th century, images and print media helped to promote the Sinai monastery as a strong focus of Christian pilgrimage and transform it to an iconic place. Kristine Larison, Tufts Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer of Art History, will speak on “Replicating Sacred Space at Sinai” at 5:30 p.m. in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. This lecture is free and open to the public; call 214-768-2698 for more information.

Memoirs and history: The SMU Center for Presidential History invites you to a lecture on The Evolving Story of the George W. Bush Administration. On Friday, Feb. 2Melvin Leffler will speak on the foreign policies of the George W. Bush administration, specifically the complexities of American foreign policy in the pre- and post-9/11 world. Two of Dr. Leffler’s books, For the Soul of Mankind and In Uncertain Times, will be available for purchasing and signing at the lecture. The lecture starts at 5 p.m. in the Jones Great Hall of the Meadows Museum. This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

MSO: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra kicks off their Spring Term season on Friday, Feb. 1. The weekend performances will feature winners of the annual Meadows Concerto Competition, including student conductors Eldred Marshall, Jonathan Moore and Parisa Zaeri and soloists Daniel Hawkins on horn and Rebecca Roose singing soprano. The concert starts at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1 and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

(Image via SMU Center For Presidential History)

January 29, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 15, 2012

Comini Lecture: The Meadows School of the Arts presents Dana Leibsohn, Priscilla van der Poel Professor of Art of Smith College, in the Comini Lecture Series on Thursday, Oct. 18. Leibsohn will focus on the work of Antonio de Margo contemporary conceptions of style and materiality to discuss what constitutes a “good colonial object” in regards to art from Spanish America. The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum and is free and open to the public.

Women’s rights in the Muslim world: A panel of notable females will speak about women’s rights in the Muslim world at SMU Thursday, Oct. 18. “Giving Voice to Muslim Women” is presented by the University’s Embrey Human Rights Program, and featured panelists include Fawzia Afzal-Khan, Sahar Aziz, and Shahnaz Bukhari – all scholars who are well versed in Muslim traditions. Barbara Harlow will moderate the discussion that begins at 7:30 p.m., preceded by a 7 p.m. reception. The event will be in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, and is free and open to the public.

Weekday Boulevard: The SMU Mustangs will face Houston on Thursday, Oct. 18. The game kicks off at 7 p.m. in Ford Stadium. Pony up!

Artist and activist: The Meadows School of the Arts continues its Visiting Artist Lecture Series with Lillian Ball on Friday, Oct. 19. Ball is an artist and environmental activist who will speak on her various projects – including her work Leap of Faith, which combines different art mediums to voice issues on a wetland preservation project. Ball combines her backgrounds in anthropology, ethnographic film and sculpture to craft her unique work. The lecture begins at 1 p.m. in the Greer Garson Screening Room, Owen Arts Center.

Dazzle the darkness: Meadows School of the Arts will host its first choral concert of the season Sunday, Oct. 21, featuring the Meadows Concert Choir, Meadows Chorale and Diva Dolce (a select women’s ensemble and the newest vocal group in Meadows). The theme of the concert is the soul’s search for healing light amidst darkness and sorrow, and is inspired by Madeline L’Engle’s poem A Ring of Endless Light. The Chorale will also perform with the Meadows Symphony Orchestra, providing a night of musical enchantment. The concert begins at 3 p.m. in the Owen Arts Center. Admission is free; the Meadows choirs are asking instead that you make a donation to the North Texas Food Bank.

October 15, 2012|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 28, 2010

censored text‘Heretical’ exhibition: SMU’s Bridwell Library adds to their already large stable of exhibits as a new research piece on Medieval censorship, Heresy and Error: The Ecclesiastical Censorship of Books, 1400-1800, continues today. Contained within the exhibit are damaged and censored texts from the mid-1500s, when censor-heavy religious groups such as the Council of Trent sought to expurge and control all information related to the Church. (Pictured right, an example from Erasmus: In Novum Testamentum.) The exhibit operates within normal Bridwell Library hours, which can be found here and will run through Dec. 17. For more information, visit the Bridwell Library site or call 214-768-3483.

Brazil’s history in pictures: Meadows’ Comini Lecture Series continues with a look at the rapid modernization of Brazil during the Roaring ’20s and its effects not only on the nation itself but on geographer and explorer Alexander H. Rice, who is the subject of the lecture’s two documentaries. Culled together from 1924-25 footage, these records paint two contrasting pictures of Rice’s journey and paint a picture of how Brazil quickly rose from colony to an epicenter of industrialization in South America. The lecture is at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 30 in the Bob Hope Theatre. Admission is free, but reservations are required. For more information, call 214-768-2698; for reservations call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Return of the celluloid: The Student Filmmakers’ Association will hold its bi-annual Film Fest Oct. 1. Works are culled from across SMU’s diverse Cinema-Television family, with works ranging from conventional drama, comedy and documentary to experimental and animation. The event will begin at 7 p.m. in the O’Donnell Auditorium, Owen Arts Center, and is free and open to the public. For more information, call 214-768-2129.

September 28, 2010|Calendar Highlights|
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