Clements Department of History

SMU sponsors musical tribute to African American author-activist Margaret Walker Alexander on Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Randy Klein and Aurelia Williams

Randy Klein, at piano, and Aurelia Williams

Members of the SMU community are invited to a free performance of “For My People: A New Musical Work” on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 7 p.m. at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, Clarence Muse Café Theater, 1309 Canton Street, Dallas.

Celebrating the centennial of the birth of acclaimed African American poet-scholar-activist Margaret Walker Alexander (1915-1998), the event will feature the opus’ author, Randy Klein, joined by Aurelia Williams and the Heart and Soul Singers performing in honor of SMU’s first sponsorship of the annual College Language Association (CLA) convention (April 8-11 in Dallas).

Margaret Walker Alexander

Margaret Walker Alexander

Co-sponsors of the musical tribute are SMU’s Department of English and Ethnic Studies Program in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences along with the University’s Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, in partnership with the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, the College Language Association and Dr. Maryemma Graham of the University of Kansas.

“This is not only CLA’s 75th convention and the centennial of Dr. Margaret Walker Alexander’s birth, but it’s also the centennial of SMU’s opening,” says CLA host committee chair Darryl Dickson-Carr, associate professor of English in SMU’s Dedman College.

“Walker Alexander was the direct inspiration for The Black Academy of Arts and Letters, as its founder, Curtis King, was her student and protégé,” Dickson-Carr says. “The CLA’s first visit to Texas in 50 years coincides with remarkable events in Dallas and SMU’s histories, and features the work of some of its best and most celebrated students.”

Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith

Synthia Green

Synthia Green

SMU will host a private reception for CLA members at Café 43 in the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. University leaders set to greet CLA guests include Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero, Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies James Quick and Department of English Chair Nina Schwartz.

A jazz trio led by Dylan Smith of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will provide entertainment, as will Meadows student Synthia Green.

SMU English Department graduate students will serve as CLA convention volunteers.

For more details about the CLA and related events, contact Dr. Dickson-Carr.

Written by Denise Gee

April 2, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News|

Three SMU history scholars receive 2013-14 book prizes

Three SMU history scholars recently won prestigious awards for books honed during their time at the University.

“These recognitions confirm that the Clements Department of History – through its graduate program and research institute ­– continues to lead the way in producing first-rate scholarship on Texas, the American Southwest, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands,” says Andrew Graybill, associate professor and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies.

Raul CoronadoRaúl Coronado’s book A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s Kate Broocks Bates Award for Best Historical Research and second prize from the Texas Institute of Letters’ Ramirez Prize for Best Scholarly Book. Coronado completed his Ph.D. in modern thought and literature in 2004 at Stanford University. He was a William P. Clements Fellow in 2009-10 and is associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of California-Berkeley.

Jason MellardJason Mellard’s Progressive Country: How the 1970s Transformed the Texan in Popular Culture (University of Texas Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s 2013 Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for Best Book on Texas History. He completed his Ph.D. in American studies at the University of Texas-Austin in 2009 and was a 2010-11 Clements Fellow. He is currently the assistant director at the Center for Texas Music History at Texas State University in San Marcos.

Alicia DeweyPh.D. graduate Alicia Dewey won the Robert A. Calvert Book Prize for the best manuscript on the history of the American South, West or Southwest submitted in 2013 to Texas A&M University Press. Her book, Pesos and Dollars: Entrepreneurs in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, 1880-1940, is scheduled for publication in summer 2014. Dewey earned her Ph.D in history at SMU in 2007 and is currently an associate professor of history at Biola University in La Mirada, California.

Established in fall 1996, the Clements Center in SMU’s Dedman College is internationally known as an incubator for research and writing and an organizer of public programming, all related to the American Southwest.

The center annually provides post-doctoral fellowships for scholars studying the American Southwest and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, allowing them to focus on additional research and to further develop manuscripts, leading to publication by prestigious presses in cooperation with the Center.

Fellowships to emerging and senior scholars have resulted in 38 books published by 17 major university presses. Nine more Clements Center Fellows have publications forthcoming.

Written by Devean Owens ’14

> Read more from SMU News

April 14, 2014|For the Record, News|

For the Record: Nov. 26, 2013

Book cover of 'The Millennial Sovereign' by A. Azfar Moin, SMUAzfar Moin, William P. Clements Department of History, Dedman College, has won two major awards this fall for his first book. The Millennial Sovereign: Sacred Kingship and Sainthood in Islam (Columbia University Press) earned the American Academy of Religion’s 2013 award for Best First Book in the History of Religions. It also received the 2013 John F. Richards Prize, awarded annually by the American Historical Association, as the most distinguished work of scholarship on South Asian history published in English. This prize will be awarded during a ceremony at the Association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. in January 2014.

santiago-canon-valencia-solo-cdSantiago Cañón Valencia, a graduate student in the Division of Music, Meadows School of the Arts, released a new performance CD, Solo, in March 2013. The Strad magazine has praised the 18-year-old Colombian’s “technically flawless” and “simply tremendous” playing, calling the CD “one of the most persuasive programmes of solo cello music … to date.” He is a Performer’s Diploma candidate in cello under the instruction of Meadows professor and international concert artist Andrés Díaz.

November 26, 2013|Faculty in the News, For the Record|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 25, 2013

GM121412-0236

Dr. Eric Bing via George W. Bush Institute

New adventures in global health: SMU and Bush Institute concurrent appointee Eric Bing will speak on conquering the challenges of global health in “Making a Cure for Cancer as Accessible as Coca-Cola” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. His lecture will include discussion of his work as creator of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, an $85 million public-private partnership to reduce cervical and breast cancer in low-resource settings. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He is Senior Fellow and Director of Global Health in the George W. Bush Institute and a professor of global health in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in Dedman College’s Department of Anthropology. The lecture is free.

The Usefulness of Art: Meadows Prize winner Tania Bruguera and SMU Associate Professor of Art Noah Simblist will host a conversation on the use of art in exploring real-world issues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 at the Texas Theatre, 213 W. Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Bruguera, a 2013-14 Meadows Prize Winner and Meadows Visiting Artist, founded Immigrant Movement International, a think tank for immigrant issues that offers free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to the immigrant community. Simblist won the 2007 Moss/Chumley Artist Award presented by the Meadows Museum and was recently a guest blogger for Art21. The conversation is presented by Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas and SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

Stanton Sharp Lecture: SMU’s Clements Department of History presents “Revolution, Reform and Rejuvenation: A Century of Intellectual Service in ChinaWednesday, Sept. 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Timothy Cheek, professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research in the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, will speak on China’s intellectuals from the start of Modern Turmoil in the 1890s to the declared “victory” of a Rising China at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek will explore China’s intellectuals by tracking five notable Chinese from across the century who all sought to “serve the people.” Cheek has written three books and is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao. The event begins with a reception at 6 p.m.; the lecture follows at 6:30 p.m.

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales, via Riviera 24

Music at Meadows: Brothers Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales will perform a chamber program for piano and guitar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 in the Bob & Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The duo was born in Spain, have performed throughout the world and recorded five albums. Critics rave that their music is “unique in the way both instruments melt as one with grand elegance and fine touch.” The concert is free and open to the public.

September 25, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: March 27, 2013

Screen shot 2013-03-25 at 1.18.00 PMStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History presents “‘The Hispanic Challenge’ and the ‘Mexicanization’ of America” by Neil Foley, SMU’s Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History. Foley will focus on the rapid increase in the Hispanic population since the 1980s and the fear Americans hold that Hispanic immigration will be the end of America’s “core Anglo-Protestant culture.” The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, with a reception beforehand at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Please contact Mildred Pinkston for more information.

Comini Lecture: Susan Verdi Webster, Jane Williams Mahoney Professor of Art History and Studies at the College of William and Mary, will speak on “The Secret Lives of Buildings in Colonial Quito: People, Processes and Cultural Optics” at 5:30 p.m. Friday, March 29 in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum, Webster will discuss Andean and European perspectives on architectural production in colonial Quito, Ecuador, with the view that the way buildings are perceived within a historical context is based upon who is actually doing the looking. Learn about her unique approach to analyzing and understanding architectural production within colonial contexts at this event.

Happy Good Friday and Easter Weekend!

(Images c/o SMU) 

March 27, 2013|Calendar Highlights|
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