Clements Department of History

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 25, 2013

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Dr. Eric Bing via George W. Bush Institute

New adventures in global health: SMU and Bush Institute concurrent appointee Eric Bing will speak on conquering the challenges of global health in “Making a Cure for Cancer as Accessible as Coca-Cola” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. His lecture will include discussion of his work as creator of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, an $85 million public-private partnership to reduce cervical and breast cancer in low-resource settings. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He is Senior Fellow and Director of Global Health in the George W. Bush Institute and a professor of global health in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in Dedman College’s Department of Anthropology. The lecture is free.

The Usefulness of Art: Meadows Prize winner Tania Bruguera and SMU Associate Professor of Art Noah Simblist will host a conversation on the use of art in exploring real-world issues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 at the Texas Theatre, 213 W. Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Bruguera, a 2013-14 Meadows Prize Winner and Meadows Visiting Artist, founded Immigrant Movement International, a think tank for immigrant issues that offers free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to the immigrant community. Simblist won the 2007 Moss/Chumley Artist Award presented by the Meadows Museum and was recently a guest blogger for Art21. The conversation is presented by Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas and SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

Stanton Sharp Lecture: SMU’s Clements Department of History presents “Revolution, Reform and Rejuvenation: A Century of Intellectual Service in ChinaWednesday, Sept. 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Timothy Cheek, professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research in the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, will speak on China’s intellectuals from the start of Modern Turmoil in the 1890s to the declared “victory” of a Rising China at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek will explore China’s intellectuals by tracking five notable Chinese from across the century who all sought to “serve the people.” Cheek has written three books and is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao. The event begins with a reception at 6 p.m.; the lecture follows at 6:30 p.m.

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales, via Riviera 24

Music at Meadows: Brothers Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales will perform a chamber program for piano and guitar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 in the Bob & Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The duo was born in Spain, have performed throughout the world and recorded five albums. Critics rave that their music is “unique in the way both instruments melt as one with grand elegance and fine touch.” The concert is free and open to the public.

Calendar Highlights: March 27, 2013

Screen shot 2013-03-25 at 1.18.00 PMStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History presents “‘The Hispanic Challenge’ and the ‘Mexicanization’ of America” by Neil Foley, SMU’s Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History. Foley will focus on the rapid increase in the Hispanic population since the 1980s and the fear Americans hold that Hispanic immigration will be the end of America’s “core Anglo-Protestant culture.” The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, with a reception beforehand at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Please contact Mildred Pinkston for more information.

Comini Lecture: Susan Verdi Webster, Jane Williams Mahoney Professor of Art History and Studies at the College of William and Mary, will speak on “The Secret Lives of Buildings in Colonial Quito: People, Processes and Cultural Optics” at 5:30 p.m. Friday, March 29 in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum, Webster will discuss Andean and European perspectives on architectural production in colonial Quito, Ecuador, with the view that the way buildings are perceived within a historical context is based upon who is actually doing the looking. Learn about her unique approach to analyzing and understanding architectural production within colonial contexts at this event.

Happy Good Friday and Easter Weekend!

(Images c/o SMU) 

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 18, 2013

President's Day graphic

Giving art meaning: Artist David Mackenzie will be at SMU tonight, Monday, Feb. 18, as part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series. Mackenzie explores art through videos and performances focusing on identity, race and how people represent themselves in public. His work has been described as brief but powerful. Originally from Jamaica, he received a B.F.A. in printmaking from the University of the Arts. The lecture is free and open to the public and starts at 6:30 p.m. in 241 Umphrey Lee Center.

The Naples DocumentsStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History invites you to a lecture by Kenneth J. Andrien, SMU’s Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Chair in History. He will speak on the historic Naples documents, whose discovery in 1996 presented a challenge to the historical understanding of the Inca Empire and Spanish conquest. Andrien will explain these controversies and speak on whether he believes the documents are authentic. The lecture takes place Wednesday, Feb. 20, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. with the lecture following at 6:30 p.m.

SMU vs. The Great Debaters: SMU will face Wiley College in a public debate Wednesday, Feb. 20. The last time SMU took on the Marshall, Texas-based college was back in 2009. The topic of the debate is to be determined but will focus on a timely controversy that is of interest to the public. The debate starts at 7 p.m. in O’Donnell Hall, 2130 Owen Arts Center.

Arlene Sanchez WalshParar de Sufrir: The Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology welcomes Arlene Sánchez Walsh, speaking on “Parar de Sufrir: Health, Wealth, and Suffering in the Latino/a Religious Imagination.” Dr. Sánchez Walsh is an associate professor of church history at Azusa Pacific University and the 2012-13 visiting scholar for the Center. She is an expert in Pentecostal studies, one of the fastest-growing Christian movements, and has published works in this area. The lecture starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 in 121 Prothro Hall. It is free and open to the public and will include refreshments. For more information, contact Josefrayn Sánchez-Perry.

MWE: As part of Black History Month, SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble will perform an I Have A Dream concert featuring a reading of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech performed by Meadows alum Donnie Ray Albert and a gospel collaboration with the Hamilton Park Baptist Church Men’s Choir. Albert will also perform two spirituals. The performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. Buy tickets online or contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Research: A new look at the Native American movement

'Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power' book coverWhen several hundred Native Americans took over the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C., on November 3, 1972, it was with the backing of a hodgepodge of supporters ranging  from hippies to Methodists to Hollywood celebrities.

SMU History Professor Sherry Smith’s new book, Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power  (Oxford University Press, 2012), is the first to examine this alliance that cut across racial, ethnic and class lines.

“I felt this story had not been told,” says Smith, who devoted 10 years to writing the book. “The primary figures in the Red Power movement  – the most important movers and shakers – were Native Americans. But the support they received from non-Indians was a critical, even essential, component in their ultimate successes.”

Hippies looked to Native Americans as symbols of alternative ways of life that were opposite of established society’s values and beliefs, but the hippie-Indian interaction was more textured and complicated than that, Smith says.

“Hippies were among the first non-Indians of the postwar generation to seek out contact with Native Americans, learn about their grievances, and join their call for reform,” she says. “They did so in large and significant numbers, which in turn caught the attention of the rest of the nation.”

To tell the story, Smith interviewed non-Indians involved in the alliance such as Stewart Brand, creator of the Whole Earth Catalog; actor and counterculture activist Peter Coyote, as well as Native Americans such as Joe Sando of the Albuquerque Pueblo Cultural Center. She also relied on sources ranging from the Richard Nixon Presidential Papers to the American Friends Service Committee.

Smith links the interest in Indian affairs in the 1960s and ’70s to cultural events such as the 1962 publication of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, which featured one of the first prominent fictional contemporary Indian characters, Chief Broom. In addition, Dee Brown’s 1970 bestseller, Bury My Heart at Wounded Kneeopened readers’ eyes to the root of Native American demands with the first history of the American West told from the Indians’ point of view.

As the 40th anniversary of events such as the Trail of Broken Treaties (Nov. 3-9, 1972) and the occupation of Wounded Knee (Feb. 27-May 8, 1973) approaches, Smith’s book examines a period when Americans supported social justice movements that did not serve their personal interests.

“I was very impressed with those individuals and groups, including the church-based organizations, that rose to the occasion and helped push for substantive reform in Indian policy in the 1970s,” Smith says. “This was not about them, but about others. They had nothing to gain personally, other than a sense that the nation was finally living up to its promises.”

Can it happen again?

“We have become increasingly fragmented in this country,” Smith says. “I think our nation has been in a reactive state for 40 years now, turning away from the turmoil and challenges of the Sixties. But I am heartened by the resurgence of activism. It is certainly possible and even probable that social and economic justice movements will be revitalized.”

> Read more from SMU News

Research: A field-changing view of divine kingship in Islam

'The Millennial Sovereign' by Azfar Moin, book coverIn a new and potentially field-changing study, SMU historian Azfar Moin explores why Muslim sovereigns in the early modern era began to imitate the exalted nature of Sufi saints.

Uncovering a startling but widespread phenomenon, Moin shows how the charismatic pull of sainthood (wilayat) — rather than the draw of religious law (sharia) or holy war (jihad) —inspired a new style of sovereignty in Islam. Moin’s research is published in his new book, The Millennial Sovereign (Columbia University Press, 2012).

At the end of the 16th century and the turn of the first Islamic millennium, the powerful Mughal emperor Akbar declared himself the most sacred being on earth. The holiest of all saints and above the distinctions of religion, he styled himself as the messiah reborn. Yet the Mughal emperor was not alone in doing so.

The title of the book reflects the Mughal emperors’ messianic and Sufi beliefs, which also led these Muslim rulers to explore European Christianity, says Moin, an expert on the history of South Asia who teaches in the Clements Department of History of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

“The Mughal emperors of 16th- and 17th-century India — of Taj Mahal fame — were also avid collectors of Christian art. They even invited Jesuit missionaries to discuss the Bible. At first the Catholic priests were delighted that such powerful Muslim kings were attracted to Christianity, but they eventually realized that their hosts were more interested in the millennium,” Moin says.

“The first millennium of Islam occurred at the end of the 16th century,” he says. “The Mughals used this religiously charged moment to style themselves as saintly and messianic sovereigns. They called their queens ‘The Mary of the Age’ and ‘Of the Stature of Mary.’ This didn’t mean that they had turned Christian, but that they were Jesus-like in their sacredness.”

“This is a brilliant book,” said South Asia expert Francis Robinson, a professor at Royal Holloway, University of London. “It is the most innovative contribution to our understanding of Mughal history of my time. As a work of the first importance, and a step change in our knowledge of 16th-century India, it must be read by anyone interested in the fields of Islamic kingship, millenarianism and astrology in the Muslim world, and in the early modern world in general.”— Columbia University Press

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

SMU graduates honor Jeremy Adams with endowed professorship

SMU History Professor Jeremy Adams

Jeremy duQuesnay Adams

Two SMU graduates are showing appreciation for a professor who made a lasting impact on their lives by establishing an endowed professorship in his honor.

The $1.25 million gift from Stephen L. and Kathryn Hedges Arata of Dallas will create the Jeremy duQuesnay Adams Centennial Professorship in Western European Medieval History in honor of the longtime SMU professor, who will continue to teach in the University’s Clements Department of History.

“We are honored to have an endowed professorship bearing the name of one of SMU’s most distinguished and revered faculty members,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are grateful to the Aratas for their vision and generosity in providing this gift, which supports our Second Century Campaign goal to increase the number of endowed chairs to 100. With the Adams Professorship, the University is within 15 faculty positions of reaching that goal.”

Several other former students of Professor Adams have contributed toward the endowed professorship in his honor. Those contributing $25,000 and more include Cindy and Dr. David Stager Jr. ’87; Jo ’90 and Joe Goyne; and Renee Justice Standley ’90 and Kenneth Standley.

Both the Aratas majored in English and minored in medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College. Kathryn earned her B.A. degree in 1987 and an M.A. in English from SMU in 1991. Stephen received two degrees from SMU in 1988 — a B.A. from Dedman College and B.B.A. from Cox School of Business. He also earned a Master’s of Management degree from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Kathryn Arata said, “My parents, the Rev. Bill B. Hedges and Jane Hedges, graduated from SMU in 1960. All of my life I have loved this university, growing up steeped in the SMU culture and history. When I finally arrived on the campus, I was captivated by the quality and variety of the courses offered.

“Jeremy Adams created a sense of academic curiosity and desire for learning that I possess to this day. Now that Stephen and I are in a position to pay back (actually pay forward) the gifts he gave us, we wanted to do something that would be close to Jeremy’s heart. He is passionate about his subject, and we have given this endowment to ensure that his passion will continue to light the fires of academic curiosity in students for years to come.”

The Adams Professorship is the first Centennial Professorship to be established in Dedman College. The “Centennial” designation is a special gift category during SMU’s 100th anniversary commemoration, 2011-15. It requires that gifts meet elevated giving levels and provide a combination of endowment and annual support. Because a faculty position designated as “Centennial” enables the appointment to be made sooner, SMU has initiated a search to fill the Adams Professorship in the 2013-14 academic year.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Gov. Bill Clements remembered as SMU alumnus and supporter

Bill and Rita Clements at SMU-in-TaosFormer Texas Governor William P. Clements Jr., a longtime major supporter of SMU academic programs, died May 29, 2011 in Dallas. He was 94 years old.

Clements’ relationship with SMU began in the mid-1930s, when he was an engineering student. Through the years he and his wife, Rita, have contributed more than $21 million for some of SMU’s highest academic priorities, including support for his special interest in the Southwest.

“Bill Clements’ generosity and guidance have made a significant impact on academic programs throughout SMU, with major gifts supporting engineering, theology, mathematics and history,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “By endowing the Clements Department of History, including a new Ph.D. program, and the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, he enabled students ranging from undergraduates to doctoral fellows to learn more about the history and cultures of this region. Bill and Rita Clements also made it possible for SMU to acquire, rebuild and offer academic programs at SMU-in-Taos, located on the site of historic Fort Burgwin in northern New Mexico. This facility has given generations of students and faculty a tremendous and unique resource for teaching, learning and research.

“Earlier, as chair of SMU’s Board from 1967-73 and again from 1983-86, Bill Clements led the formation of an endowment committee resulting in dramatic increases in market value. He led funding of the campus master plan that continues to guide our academic offerings, and with an eye for detail in bricks and mortar, he preserved the continuity of SMU’s Collegiate Georgian architecture.

“All this he accomplished with his typical no-nonsense approach and direct style of communication. His legacy as a business leader, public official and supporter of SMU will stand the test of time. He was a member of the SMU community for more than 70 years and he will be greatly missed.”

A memorial service honoring the life of Governor Clements will be held 4 p.m. Thursday, June 2 at St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church.

Gifts to SMU in memory of Governor Clements can be directed to the William P. Clements Jr. Memorial Fund. Visit the SMU Giving homepage for information on how to make a gift to SMU.

> Read more on Gov. Clements and his more than 70-year relationship with SMU

Above, Bill and Rita Clements at the 2009 opening of new student housing they helped to provide for the SMU-in-Taos campus on the grounds of Fort Burgwin, New Mexico. Photo by Hillsman S. Jackson.

Remembering the Civil War on its 150th anniversary

Steven HahnTuesday, April 12, 2011 marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War with the first shots fired on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. SMU’s Clements Department of History will observe the date on which the deadliest conflict in the nation’s history began with a Stanton Sharp Lecture by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Steven Hahn.

Hahn will discuss “Why the Civil War Mattered” at 6:30 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The event will begin with a reception at 6 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

How might America have looked had there been no Civil War – or if the war had ended differently? Hahn’s lecture will revisit these issues by reminding us of the power of slaveholders and slavery in antebellum America.

“The legacy of the Civil War and its aftermath is still unfolding in this nation. Issues of race remain current and contentious,” says Sherry L. Smith, professor and acting chair of SMU’s Clements Department of History. “Understanding this war – what was at stake and what changed as a result of it – is critical in coming to terms with race in America.”

Hahn is the Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor in American History at the University of Pennsylvania. His latest book, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South, from Slavery to the Great Migration (Harvard University Press, 2005), won the Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize in American History and the Merle Curti Prize in Social History of the Organization of American Historians.

He also is the author of the prize-winning book The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Upcountry, 1850-1890 (Oxford University Press, 1983).

Written by Denise Gee

> Read more about SMU Civil War resources from SMU News
> Learn more about SMU’s Stanton Sharp Lecture Series online

Pubols’ family saga wins 2009 Clements Book Prize

Louise PubolsLouise Pubols (right), chief curator of history at the Oakland Museum of California, has won SMU’s William P. Clements Book Prize for the best nonfiction book on the Southwest published in 2009. Pubols’ winning entry is The Father of All: The De La Guerra Family, Power, and Patriarchy in Mexican California, published by the University of California Press and the Huntington Library.

Pubols’ work explores the history of the de la Guerras of Santa Barbara, a powerful California family that adapted to economic and political upheavals that included the U.S.-Mexican War. Pubols traces the de la Guerras’ political, business and family relationships to illustrate how patriarchy functioned from generation to generation in Spanish and Mexican California.

The story of this influential extended family opens vistas onto larger debates about patriarchy, Mexican liberalism, intermarriage, and the economic and social transformations of Mexican California, says Benjamin Johnson, professor in SMU’s William P. Clements Department of History in Dedman College and director of its Clements Center for Southwest Studies.

“Popular understanding and scholarly arguments alike treat the Mexican North – the area that now constitutes the U.S. states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California – as sleepy backwaters in comparison to the dynamic young United States. Pubols’ close study of politics and society in Mexican California really demolishes this view,” Johnson says. “She shows how Mexican liberalism, unleashed by that young nation’s independence, transformed California’s economy, family life and politics. Mexican California’s elites were adaptive and clever.”

Book cover for 'The Father of All' by Louise PubolsJohnson hails the prize-winning book as “gracefully written and deeply researched.” Perhaps most impressively, “Pubols both draws on and contributes to a generation of historical scholarship on the U.S. West and Latin America alike,” he adds.

The quality and number of Clements Book Prize entries prompted the judges to name two finalists for the second year in a row, Johnson adds. Those honors went to Katherine Benton-Cohen of Georgetown University for Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands (Harvard University Press) and Patrick Ettinger of California State University-Sacramento for Imaginary Lines: Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, 1882-1930 (University of Texas Press).

Past Clements Book Prize winners have also won awards from the American Historical Association, Organization of American Historians, Western History Association, and Southern Historical Association, as well as the Bancroft Prize awarded by Columbia University.

The deadline for submissions for the 2010 prize is Feb. 5, 2011. For more information, visit the Clements Center website.

Clements Center founding director David Weber dies

David J. WeberSMU Professor David J. Weber, one of the nation’s leading scholars on the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, died Aug. 20 of multiple myeloma. He was 69.

Weber joined SMU’s Department of History in 1976 and chaired the Department from 1979 to 1986. He also held the Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Weber was the founding director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at SMU, part of the Clements Department of History, both endowed by former Governor William P. Clements and his wife, Rita. The Clements Center for Southwest Studies is widely regarded as the leading institute for the study of the American West and the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.

In leading the History Department’s new Ph.D. program and the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Weber was a mentor to numerous graduate students as well as post-doctoral fellows awarded stipends to conduct research and complete their manuscripts for publication through the Center. Hundreds of other scholars throughout the world followed Weber’s work and learned from his publications. He retired from teaching in spring 2010 but continued his research and writing.

As an internationally renowned scholar, David Weber “brought honor to SMU through his achievements,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “But he was also a dedicated teacher inspiring all levels of students, from undergraduates to post-doctoral fellows. He helped to shape the entire discipline of Southwest studies, leaving us with a greater understanding of our region’s history and cultures.”

“David Weber was not only one of the greatest historians of his generation, but also one of the most beloved,” said James K. Hopkins, long-time colleague and former chair of the Clements Department of History. “Colleagues, students, readers and friends around the world will mourn our loss today and for a long time to come. His life enlarged us all.”

Two governments gave Weber the highest honor they can bestow on foreigners: in 2002 King Juan Carlos of Spain named him to membership in the Real Orden de Isabel la Católica, the Spanish equivalent of a knighthood, and in 2005 Mexico named him to the Orden Mexicana del Águila Azteca (the Order of the Aztec Eagle). He was one of a few U.S. historians elected to the Mexican Academy of History.

Honors in the United States included his 2007 induction into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

“David Weber was a gentle man and a brilliant scholar. He was a visionary whose academic interest in the history of the Southwest was equaled only by his love for the region,” said George Bayoud of Dallas, long-time and immediate past chair of the Advisory Panel for the Clements Center for Southwest Studies. “David built the Center into a thriving forum for research, dialogue and scholarship. Numerous books by emerging scholars have resulted from the time they spent under David’s guidance. Those of us who worked with David on the Advisory Panel were honored and fortunate to spend time with him and learn from him.”

Plans for a service in Dallas are pending.

Memorials may be made to the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, SMU Office of Development, P.O. Box 281, Dallas, TX 75275, or the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

> Read more from SMU News

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