Clements Center for Southwest Studies

Lance R. Blyth receives Weber-Clements Prize for his examination of “communities of violence” in northern Mexico

'Chiricahua and Janos' book coverA book examining the history of violence on the Mexico border, and how it has provided cohesion as well as disturbance to some communities, has received the 2014 David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.

SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies will present the annual book prize Wednesday, April 2, to historian Lance R. Blyth for Chiricahua and Janos: Communities of Violence in the Southwest Borderlands, 1680 to 1880 (University of Nebraska Press, 2012). The Weber-Clements Prize honors both the center’s founding director and founding benefactor.

Blyth is deputy director of the Office of History at U.S. Northern Command and a research associate professor at the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. He will be honored at a 6 p.m. reception, followed by a 6:30 p.m. lecture and book-signing in DeGolyer Library. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Call 214-678-3684 to register.

In Chiricahua and Janos, Blyth examines two centuries of violence in northern Mexico between the Chiricahua Apaches and the Hispanic garrison community of Janos. He demonstrates how violence became the primary means by which relations were established, maintained, or altered both within and between communities.

In selecting the book, judges wrote, “Chiricahua and Janos begins with the foundational premise that violence can build as much as disrupt communities. From this premise, it constructs a riveting narrative about how the communities, economies, and families of Chiricahua Apaches and Spaniards at Janos presidio became intricately entwined through two centuries of reciprocal violence and accommodation.”

The Weber-Clements Book Prize is presented by the Western History Association and the Clements Center and is administered by the Western History Association. The $2,500 award honors fine writing and original research on the American Southwest. The competition is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2014

Plains Indians and Their Horses: The Clement Center for Southwest Studies presents “Rethinking Horses, Native Peoples and Colonialism in the North American Borderlands,” Wednesday, Jan. 29. The lecture will focus on a new approach to Plains Indians and horses; placing the Plains in a broader continental context. Thomas Andrews will give the talk; Andrews specializes in the social and environmental history of the Rocky Mountain West and received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The night will begin with a reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m. and book signing immediately following. The event is in DeGolyer Library and is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Image from ''FRANK HENDERSON'S DRAWING BOOK" via Clements Center

Image from ”FRANK HENDERSON’S DRAWING BOOK” via Clements Center

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Enacting the Archives, Discentering the Muses: Professor Walter Mignolo will speak at Meadows Museum on Thursday, Jan. 30 at 5:30 p.m. Mignolo makes the point that delinking and de-westernization are taking place in the sphere of museums and biennials; he will speak on three specific examples from which this theory stems. Mignolo received his Ph.D. from Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris and is now the William H. Wannamaker Professor of Literature at Duke University, holding joint appointments in cultural anthropology and Romance studies. Thursday’s lecture is part of the Comini Lecture Series and will be held in Bob Smith Auditorium.

A Night of Stravinsky: The Meadows Wind Ensemble invites you to a concert featuring four works by Stravinsky – one including performers from SMU’s Division of Dance and another starring Meadows faculty member and pianist Catharine Lysinger. The concert take place Friday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

Tune In: SMU’s Andrew Graybill on KERA’s ‘Think’ Nov. 7, 2013

Andrew R. GraybillAndrew Graybill, associate professor of history and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss changing notions of racial identity in the West on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Graybill will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Tune in at kera.org/listen

Graybill’s new book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), follows the story of Montana fur trader Malcolm Clarke and his Piegan Blackfeet wife, Coth-co-co-na, focusing on the 1870 Marias Massacre – set in motion by the murder of Malcolm Clarke and in which Clarke’s two sons rode with the Second U.S. Cavalry to kill their own blood relatives.

In his examination of this historical tragedy, Graybill sheds light on how racial attitudes changed from the 19th century, in which Native-white marriages proliferated, to the 20th, in which such families often encountered virulent prejudice.

Visit SMU’s Clements Center online at smu.edu/swcenter

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2013

Fame & photography: The Meadows Museum presents a lecture on the evolution of art and its influence on society, “The Construction of Artistic Celebrity in the Late Nineteenth Century,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29. The lecture focuses on the 1850s and the introduction of mass-produced photographic prints, and “how art dealers, photographers and journalists worked in concert to transform artists into trendsetters and their works into status symbols for nouveau riche collectors.” Anne McCauley, Professor of the History of Photography and Modern Art at Princeton University, will give the lecture and use the album compiled by William H. Stewart, recently acquired by Meadows, to convey her point. The lecture will be in the Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium and is free to attend.

Collage c/o SMU Women's & Gender Studies Program

Shelby Knox (Collage c/o SMU Women’s & Gender Studies Program)

Feminist, Activist, Texan: Women’s rights activist Shelby Knox will speak at SMU, Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m. Knox started her women’s rights journey at 15 years old when she campaigned to have her Lubbock high school adopt comprehensive sex education as well as allow a gay-straight alliance. Her work was then chronicled in the 2005 Sundance film, “The Education of Shelby Knox.” Knox now travels across the country speaking and hosting workshops on women’s issues; she is also working on a book. The SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program invites you to this free event in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

As the Nation May Direct: The Clements Center for Southwest Studies presents a Noon Talk on “Pensions and the Financing of a Post-Removal Cherokee Nation” Wednesday, Oct. 30at noon. The talk will focus on the history of Cherokee pensions, starting with the Red Stick Revolt in the War of 1812, and how they have changed since then and what that means for the Cherokees. Julie Reed will host the talk; she is the David J. Weber Research Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at the Clements Center. Reed is also revising for publication her book manuscript, Ten Times Better: Cherokee Social Services, during her time at the Clements Center. Noon Talk is free and open to the public and will be held in DeGolyer Library.

MSO: Meadows Symphony Orchestra invites you to a concert featuring guest violinist and SMU Meadows Artists-in-Residence Chee-Yun Kim. Kim attended Juilliard School of Music, has received several music honors and has even appeared in an episode of HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm. Kim will perform Jean Sibelius Violin Concerto, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 and more. There will be performances Friday, Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3 p.m in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students, please call 214-768-ARTS for more information.

Calendar Highlights: April 4, 2013

Erudition-11171

photo c/o SMU English

Gilbert Lecture Series: The Department of English presents a lecture on Zimbabwean writer NoViolet Bulawayo by Elizabeth Tshele on Thursday, April 4. Tshele, herself born and raised in Zimbabwe, earned her M.A. from SMU in 2007. She will also read from her new book, We Need New Names, which will be released this summer. The event takes place in DeGolyer Library with a reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room and lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. It is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required.

Haute culture: On Thursday, April 4, SMU’s Meadows Museum presents “The Art of Fashion,” a lecture by Myra Walker, University of North Texas professor and curator and director of UNT’s Texas Fashion Collection. In 2007 she was guest curator at the Meadows for its blockbuster exhibition Balenciaga and His Legacy: Haute Couture from the Texas Fashion Collection. The lecture coincides with the second annual SMU Fashion Week, a five-day campus event in collaboration with Meadows School of the Arts, the Division of Journalism’s Minor in Fashion Media Program, and the SMU Retail Club. The event is free and open to the public and begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Museum’s Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium.

Ambivalent resistance: The Thinking about Agency Series presents Sherry Ortner, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at UCLA, on “The Case of Gendered Agency” at 3:15 p.m. Friday, April 5. Ortner has done fieldwork with the Sherpas of Nepal and has received numerous grants and fellowships. The lecture takes place in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, and is free and open to the public.

Slavery Symposium: The William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies and The School for Advanced Research present “Uniting The Histories of Slavery in North America and its Borderlands” on Saturday, April 6. The all-day public symposium will bring together specialists in history, anthropology, folklore and psychology to speak on slavery and the areas of the country it affected in the past. Panelists will present their research and results, and a moderator will guide questions and discussion between the panelists and the audience. The event begins at 10 a.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

Below is an overview of the day:

Screen shot 2013-04-03 at 1.39.36 PM

Load More Posts