Calendar Highlights: Dec. 3, 2014

Clements Center for Southwest Studies

Calendar Highlights: Dec. 3, 2014

rhetoric-of-genocide-bookcoverPublic Debate: SMU Debate Team vs. National Debate Team of Rwanda: Sponsored by the Meadows School’s Division of Communication Studies, SMU hosts a one-hour debate with the Rwandan national debate team Wednesday, Dec. 3, 7 p.m., in Umphrey Lee Center, Room 241. The topic for the evening debate is “The United States has an obligation to take the international lead against global instances of genocide.” The SMU debate team will take the affirmative and Rwanda will take the negative. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, email Dr. Ben Voth or call 214-768-2787.

Christmas Worship Services: The annual Christmas Worship Services will take place Thursday, Dec. 4, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., in Perkins Chapel. These services reflect the liturgical context of the Advent season, the musical traditions of Perkins School of Theology and Meadows School of the Arts, and the muliticultural environment of SMU. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 214-768-2091.

Houston Faust Mount II Book Signing: The SMU Central University Libraries present a book signing for Oilfield Revolutionary: The Career of Everette Lee DeGolyer with author Houston Faust Mount II Thursday, Dec. 4, 6 p.m., in the DeGolyer Library. The novel explores DeGolyer’s influence on oil exploration through national politics, geology and philanthropy. For additional information, visit the CUL News blog.

Meadows Symphony: Meadows School of the Arts presents Meadows Symphony Orchestra: Mozart, Weber and Strauss Friday, Dec. 5, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 7, 3 p.m., in the Caruth Auditorium. The performance will feature Meadows Associate Professor Carol Leone as a soloist for Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor, as well as Weber’s Overture to Der Freischutz and Strauss’s Also Sprach Zarathustra. Tickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information, call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 22, 2014

15210Contested Spaces of Early America: The William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies presents “Contested Spaces of Early America” Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 6 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The event will celebrate the publication of Contested Spaces of Early Americaan edited collection of scholarly essays supported by the Clements Center and honoring the pioneering work of David J. Weber (1940-2001), former SMU Dedman History Professor. Although this event is free and open to the public, seating is limited. E-mail the Clements Center to RSVP or call 214-768-3684.

Tower Center Monthly Seminar: As part of the Tower Center Monthly SeminarPaul Avery will discuss “Tempting Fate: Interests, Red Lines and Conflict in Nuclear Monopoly.” Avery is a postdoctoral fellow at the SMU Tower Center for Political Studies, who prior to joining the Tower Center was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT. The seminar will take place Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 3 p.m. in 227 Carr Collins Hall. While the event is free and open to the public, attendees are encouraged to RSVP.

Public Lecture on “Jews and Muslims in Christian America”: Sponsored by the Weatherred Memorial Fund and the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute, religious historian Charles L. Cohen will discuss “Jews and Muslims in Christian America.” This event will take place Thursday, Oct. 23, 4 p.m., in 100 Hyer Hall. For more information please contact Richard Cogley or Katherine Engel.

Juan Muñoz, Seated Figure Looking Backwards, 1996

Juan Muñoz, Seated Figure Looking Backwards, 1996

Museum Evening Lecture: Led by independent scholar and consultant Charlie Wylie, Meadows Museum presents “Juan Muñoz, Looking Back” Thursday, Oct. 23 at 6 p.m. in the Bob Smith Auditorium. This lecture will examine Juan Muñoz’s (1953-2001) Seated Figure Looking Backwards (1996), a recent gift from the Barrett Collection.  For more information call 214-768-4677.

Family Weekend 2014: Sponsored by the Student Foundation and organized by the Family Weekend committee, SMU Family Weekend 2014 will take place Oct. 24-26. Family members from across the nation will “Follow the Clues to SMU” for this three-day event to experience campus life. Stay updated with everything Family Weekend by connecting with Student Foundation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Engaged Learning Symposium: SMU’s Fall 2014 Engaged Learning Symposium will feature the work of twenty-five students in research, service, creative and internship programs. The event takes place Friday, Oct. 24, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center.

The Unstoried Life: The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s “The Situated Self” Annual Fellows Seminar presents University of Texas at Austin Professor Galen Strawson in a discussion of “The Unstoried Life.” Taking place Friday, Oct. 24 at 1 p.m. in 233 Umphrey Lee Center, this lecture features the question of: “Should ethically serious people seek unity in their lives?” For more information please contact Elizabeth Fielding or visit the DCII webpage.

Product Quality-Proliferation and Differentiation in Export Markets: Assistant Professor Maia Linask from the University of Richmond will present her recent work in the area of industrial organization and international trade. This event will take place Friday, Oct. 24, 2 p.m., in 303 Umphrey Lee Center.  For more information, please visit the Department of Economics homepage.

October 22, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 24, 2014

lonmorThe Morenci Marines: A Tale of Small Town America and the Vietnam War: Clements Center Monthly Talks presents Kyle Longley, author of The Morenci Marines: A Tale of Small Town America and the Vietnam War. Drawing on personal interviews and correspondence, Longley’s book sheds light on nine young men who left the Arizona mining camp of Morenci to serve their country in Vietnam. The event will take place 12:30-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24, in 144 Simmons Hall. 

Virtual Read-Out: As part of international Banned Books Week, SMU Fondren Library will host a Virtual Read-Out 2-4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24. Join SMU and readers across the world to read 30 seconds out loud from a banned book of your choice. Click here to see a list of books challenged or banned in 2013-14.

SMU's James F. Hollifield

SMU’s James F. Hollifield will lead discussion on “The Euro Crisis and the Challenge for France.”

The Euro Crisis and the Challenge for France: SMU John G. Tower Center for Political Studies hosts SMU Professor James Hollifield and Dr. Mark Wynne as they discuss “The Euro Crisis and the Challenge for France.” The event will take place 12-1:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25 in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Great Hall. Open only to Tower Center Forum members, SMU students, faculty and staff, attendees are asked to please RSVP here.

Happiness Symposia: Continuing its two-month series on “Happiness: What Makes you Smile?” the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute presents Mary Esteve, Associate Professor of English at Concordia University, Thursday, Sept. 25. Esteve will share her work on “The Politics and Polemics of Happiness: Back to the Postwar Future.” The event will take place at 5 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

33rd Season of Tate Lecture Series: Former Secretaries of State Madeleine K. Albright and Colin L. Powell will visit SMU Monday, Sept. 29 to kick off the 33rd season of the Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture SeriesRead more about the 2014-15 kickoff event.

Coach Larry Brown Lecture on Value and Ethics: The Alpha Upsilon chapter of Delta Gamma and the Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility presents Basketball Hall of Fame Head Coach, Larry Brown as the next Delta Gamma Lecturer in Values and Ethics. The event will take place 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. Read more about the Lectureship in Values and Ethics [pdf].

September 24, 2014|Calendar Highlights, Year of the Faculty|

Three SMU history scholars receive 2013-14 book prizes

Three SMU history scholars recently won prestigious awards for books honed during their time at the University.

“These recognitions confirm that the Clements Department of History – through its graduate program and research institute ­– continues to lead the way in producing first-rate scholarship on Texas, the American Southwest, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands,” says Andrew Graybill, associate professor and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies.

Raul CoronadoRaúl Coronado’s book A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s Kate Broocks Bates Award for Best Historical Research and second prize from the Texas Institute of Letters’ Ramirez Prize for Best Scholarly Book. Coronado completed his Ph.D. in modern thought and literature in 2004 at Stanford University. He was a William P. Clements Fellow in 2009-10 and is associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of California-Berkeley.

Jason MellardJason Mellard’s Progressive Country: How the 1970s Transformed the Texan in Popular Culture (University of Texas Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s 2013 Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for Best Book on Texas History. He completed his Ph.D. in American studies at the University of Texas-Austin in 2009 and was a 2010-11 Clements Fellow. He is currently the assistant director at the Center for Texas Music History at Texas State University in San Marcos.

Alicia DeweyPh.D. graduate Alicia Dewey won the Robert A. Calvert Book Prize for the best manuscript on the history of the American South, West or Southwest submitted in 2013 to Texas A&M University Press. Her book, Pesos and Dollars: Entrepreneurs in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, 1880-1940, is scheduled for publication in summer 2014. Dewey earned her Ph.D in history at SMU in 2007 and is currently an associate professor of history at Biola University in La Mirada, California.

Established in fall 1996, the Clements Center in SMU’s Dedman College is internationally known as an incubator for research and writing and an organizer of public programming, all related to the American Southwest.

The center annually provides post-doctoral fellowships for scholars studying the American Southwest and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, allowing them to focus on additional research and to further develop manuscripts, leading to publication by prestigious presses in cooperation with the Center.

Fellowships to emerging and senior scholars have resulted in 38 books published by 17 major university presses. Nine more Clements Center Fellows have publications forthcoming.

Written by Devean Owens ’14

> Read more from SMU News

April 14, 2014|For the Record, News|

Lance R. Blyth receives Weber-Clements Prize for his examination of “communities of violence” in northern Mexico

'Chiricahua and Janos' book coverA book examining the history of violence on the Mexico border, and how it has provided cohesion as well as disturbance to some communities, has received the 2014 David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.

SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies will present the annual book prize Wednesday, April 2, to historian Lance R. Blyth for Chiricahua and Janos: Communities of Violence in the Southwest Borderlands, 1680 to 1880 (University of Nebraska Press, 2012). The Weber-Clements Prize honors both the center’s founding director and founding benefactor.

Blyth is deputy director of the Office of History at U.S. Northern Command and a research associate professor at the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. He will be honored at a 6 p.m. reception, followed by a 6:30 p.m. lecture and book-signing in DeGolyer Library. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Call 214-678-3684 to register.

In Chiricahua and Janos, Blyth examines two centuries of violence in northern Mexico between the Chiricahua Apaches and the Hispanic garrison community of Janos. He demonstrates how violence became the primary means by which relations were established, maintained, or altered both within and between communities.

In selecting the book, judges wrote, “Chiricahua and Janos begins with the foundational premise that violence can build as much as disrupt communities. From this premise, it constructs a riveting narrative about how the communities, economies, and families of Chiricahua Apaches and Spaniards at Janos presidio became intricately entwined through two centuries of reciprocal violence and accommodation.”

The Weber-Clements Book Prize is presented by the Western History Association and the Clements Center and is administered by the Western History Association. The $2,500 award honors fine writing and original research on the American Southwest. The competition is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

April 2, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|
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