Clements Center for Southwest Studies

Three SMU history scholars receive 2013-14 book prizes

Three SMU history scholars recently won prestigious awards for books honed during their time at the University.

“These recognitions confirm that the Clements Department of History – through its graduate program and research institute ­– continues to lead the way in producing first-rate scholarship on Texas, the American Southwest, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands,” says Andrew Graybill, associate professor and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies.

Raul CoronadoRaúl Coronado’s book A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s Kate Broocks Bates Award for Best Historical Research and second prize from the Texas Institute of Letters’ Ramirez Prize for Best Scholarly Book. Coronado completed his Ph.D. in modern thought and literature in 2004 at Stanford University. He was a William P. Clements Fellow in 2009-10 and is associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of California-Berkeley.

Jason MellardJason Mellard’s Progressive Country: How the 1970s Transformed the Texan in Popular Culture (University of Texas Press, 2013) won the Texas State Historical Association’s 2013 Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for Best Book on Texas History. He completed his Ph.D. in American studies at the University of Texas-Austin in 2009 and was a 2010-11 Clements Fellow. He is currently the assistant director at the Center for Texas Music History at Texas State University in San Marcos.

Alicia DeweyPh.D. graduate Alicia Dewey won the Robert A. Calvert Book Prize for the best manuscript on the history of the American South, West or Southwest submitted in 2013 to Texas A&M University Press. Her book, Pesos and Dollars: Entrepreneurs in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, 1880-1940, is scheduled for publication in summer 2014. Dewey earned her Ph.D in history at SMU in 2007 and is currently an associate professor of history at Biola University in La Mirada, California.

Established in fall 1996, the Clements Center in SMU’s Dedman College is internationally known as an incubator for research and writing and an organizer of public programming, all related to the American Southwest.

The center annually provides post-doctoral fellowships for scholars studying the American Southwest and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, allowing them to focus on additional research and to further develop manuscripts, leading to publication by prestigious presses in cooperation with the Center.

Fellowships to emerging and senior scholars have resulted in 38 books published by 17 major university presses. Nine more Clements Center Fellows have publications forthcoming.

Written by Devean Owens ’14

> Read more from SMU News

Lance R. Blyth receives Weber-Clements Prize for his examination of “communities of violence” in northern Mexico

'Chiricahua and Janos' book coverA book examining the history of violence on the Mexico border, and how it has provided cohesion as well as disturbance to some communities, has received the 2014 David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.

SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies will present the annual book prize Wednesday, April 2, to historian Lance R. Blyth for Chiricahua and Janos: Communities of Violence in the Southwest Borderlands, 1680 to 1880 (University of Nebraska Press, 2012). The Weber-Clements Prize honors both the center’s founding director and founding benefactor.

Blyth is deputy director of the Office of History at U.S. Northern Command and a research associate professor at the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. He will be honored at a 6 p.m. reception, followed by a 6:30 p.m. lecture and book-signing in DeGolyer Library. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Call 214-678-3684 to register.

In Chiricahua and Janos, Blyth examines two centuries of violence in northern Mexico between the Chiricahua Apaches and the Hispanic garrison community of Janos. He demonstrates how violence became the primary means by which relations were established, maintained, or altered both within and between communities.

In selecting the book, judges wrote, “Chiricahua and Janos begins with the foundational premise that violence can build as much as disrupt communities. From this premise, it constructs a riveting narrative about how the communities, economies, and families of Chiricahua Apaches and Spaniards at Janos presidio became intricately entwined through two centuries of reciprocal violence and accommodation.”

The Weber-Clements Book Prize is presented by the Western History Association and the Clements Center and is administered by the Western History Association. The $2,500 award honors fine writing and original research on the American Southwest. The competition is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2014

Plains Indians and Their Horses: The Clement Center for Southwest Studies presents “Rethinking Horses, Native Peoples and Colonialism in the North American Borderlands,” Wednesday, Jan. 29. The lecture will focus on a new approach to Plains Indians and horses; placing the Plains in a broader continental context. Thomas Andrews will give the talk; Andrews specializes in the social and environmental history of the Rocky Mountain West and received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The night will begin with a reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m. and book signing immediately following. The event is in DeGolyer Library and is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Image from ''FRANK HENDERSON'S DRAWING BOOK" via Clements Center

Image from ”FRANK HENDERSON’S DRAWING BOOK” via Clements Center

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Meadows Wind Ensemble Conductor Jack Delaney

Enacting the Archives, Discentering the Muses: Professor Walter Mignolo will speak at Meadows Museum on Thursday, Jan. 30 at 5:30 p.m. Mignolo makes the point that delinking and de-westernization are taking place in the sphere of museums and biennials; he will speak on three specific examples from which this theory stems. Mignolo received his Ph.D. from Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris and is now the William H. Wannamaker Professor of Literature at Duke University, holding joint appointments in cultural anthropology and Romance studies. Thursday’s lecture is part of the Comini Lecture Series and will be held in Bob Smith Auditorium.

A Night of Stravinsky: The Meadows Wind Ensemble invites you to a concert featuring four works by Stravinsky – one including performers from SMU’s Division of Dance and another starring Meadows faculty member and pianist Catharine Lysinger. The concert take place Friday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

Tune In: SMU’s Andrew Graybill on KERA’s ‘Think’ Nov. 7, 2013

Andrew R. GraybillAndrew Graybill, associate professor of history and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss changing notions of racial identity in the West on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Graybill will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Tune in at kera.org/listen

Graybill’s new book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), follows the story of Montana fur trader Malcolm Clarke and his Piegan Blackfeet wife, Coth-co-co-na, focusing on the 1870 Marias Massacre – set in motion by the murder of Malcolm Clarke and in which Clarke’s two sons rode with the Second U.S. Cavalry to kill their own blood relatives.

In his examination of this historical tragedy, Graybill sheds light on how racial attitudes changed from the 19th century, in which Native-white marriages proliferated, to the 20th, in which such families often encountered virulent prejudice.

Visit SMU’s Clements Center online at smu.edu/swcenter

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2013

Fame & photography: The Meadows Museum presents a lecture on the evolution of art and its influence on society, “The Construction of Artistic Celebrity in the Late Nineteenth Century,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29. The lecture focuses on the 1850s and the introduction of mass-produced photographic prints, and “how art dealers, photographers and journalists worked in concert to transform artists into trendsetters and their works into status symbols for nouveau riche collectors.” Anne McCauley, Professor of the History of Photography and Modern Art at Princeton University, will give the lecture and use the album compiled by William H. Stewart, recently acquired by Meadows, to convey her point. The lecture will be in the Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium and is free to attend.

Collage c/o SMU Women's & Gender Studies Program

Shelby Knox (Collage c/o SMU Women’s & Gender Studies Program)

Feminist, Activist, Texan: Women’s rights activist Shelby Knox will speak at SMU, Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m. Knox started her women’s rights journey at 15 years old when she campaigned to have her Lubbock high school adopt comprehensive sex education as well as allow a gay-straight alliance. Her work was then chronicled in the 2005 Sundance film, “The Education of Shelby Knox.” Knox now travels across the country speaking and hosting workshops on women’s issues; she is also working on a book. The SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program invites you to this free event in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

As the Nation May Direct: The Clements Center for Southwest Studies presents a Noon Talk on “Pensions and the Financing of a Post-Removal Cherokee Nation” Wednesday, Oct. 30at noon. The talk will focus on the history of Cherokee pensions, starting with the Red Stick Revolt in the War of 1812, and how they have changed since then and what that means for the Cherokees. Julie Reed will host the talk; she is the David J. Weber Research Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at the Clements Center. Reed is also revising for publication her book manuscript, Ten Times Better: Cherokee Social Services, during her time at the Clements Center. Noon Talk is free and open to the public and will be held in DeGolyer Library.

MSO: Meadows Symphony Orchestra invites you to a concert featuring guest violinist and SMU Meadows Artists-in-Residence Chee-Yun Kim. Kim attended Juilliard School of Music, has received several music honors and has even appeared in an episode of HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm. Kim will perform Jean Sibelius Violin Concerto, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 and more. There will be performances Friday, Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3 p.m in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students, please call 214-768-ARTS for more information.

Calendar Highlights: April 4, 2013

Erudition-11171

photo c/o SMU English

Gilbert Lecture Series: The Department of English presents a lecture on Zimbabwean writer NoViolet Bulawayo by Elizabeth Tshele on Thursday, April 4. Tshele, herself born and raised in Zimbabwe, earned her M.A. from SMU in 2007. She will also read from her new book, We Need New Names, which will be released this summer. The event takes place in DeGolyer Library with a reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room and lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. It is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required.

Haute culture: On Thursday, April 4, SMU’s Meadows Museum presents “The Art of Fashion,” a lecture by Myra Walker, University of North Texas professor and curator and director of UNT’s Texas Fashion Collection. In 2007 she was guest curator at the Meadows for its blockbuster exhibition Balenciaga and His Legacy: Haute Couture from the Texas Fashion Collection. The lecture coincides with the second annual SMU Fashion Week, a five-day campus event in collaboration with Meadows School of the Arts, the Division of Journalism’s Minor in Fashion Media Program, and the SMU Retail Club. The event is free and open to the public and begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Museum’s Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium.

Ambivalent resistance: The Thinking about Agency Series presents Sherry Ortner, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at UCLA, on “The Case of Gendered Agency” at 3:15 p.m. Friday, April 5. Ortner has done fieldwork with the Sherpas of Nepal and has received numerous grants and fellowships. The lecture takes place in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, and is free and open to the public.

Slavery Symposium: The William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies and The School for Advanced Research present “Uniting The Histories of Slavery in North America and its Borderlands” on Saturday, April 6. The all-day public symposium will bring together specialists in history, anthropology, folklore and psychology to speak on slavery and the areas of the country it affected in the past. Panelists will present their research and results, and a moderator will guide questions and discussion between the panelists and the audience. The event begins at 10 a.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

Below is an overview of the day:

Screen shot 2013-04-03 at 1.39.36 PM

Weber-Clements Prize celebrates new name, first repeat winner

'A Great Aridness' book coverSMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies celebrates the new name – and the first repeat winner – of its prestigious annual book prize with a lecture and booksigning by author and conservationist William deBuys on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 in the University’s DeGolyer Library

DeBuys will discuss A Great Aridness: Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest as the 2012 winner of the renamed David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America. The evening begins with a 6 p.m. reception and lecture at 6:30 p.m. A book-signing will follow immediately after the lecture.

Learn more about William deBuys

In A Great Aridness, deBuys paints a vivid picture of what the Southwest might look like when the heat turns up and the water runs out. This semi-arid region – vulnerable to water shortages, rising temperatures, wildfires and many other environmental challenges – is poised to bear the heaviest consequences of global environmental change in the United States.

Examining factors such as vanishing wildlife, forest die-backs and the over-allocation of the Colorado River (upon which nearly 30 million people depend for water), the author tells the stories of the climatologists and others who are helping to untangle the causes and effects of global warming. What happens in the Southwest, deBuys suggests, will provide a glimpse of what other mid-latitude arid lands such as the Mediterranean Basin, southern Africa and the Middle East will experience in the coming years. A 2008-09 Guggenheim Fellow, deBuys spent his fellowship year working on the book.

A Great Aridness is deeply researched, engagingly written, powerful in its arguments, and of urgent importance to anyone interested in the Southwest,” wrote the Weber-Clements Book Prize judging committee upon its selection. “This is clearly the work of a mature scholar and writer at the top of his game, and with a story to tell of critical importance.”

Clements Center Director Andrew Graybill added: “A Great Aridness is easily one of the best books about the single most pressing environmental issue of our time. And it’s written with Bill deBuys’ typical clarity and grace, making it accessible to anyone interested in the future of the American Southwest, and the planet more broadly.”

One of deBuys’ six books, Salt Dreams: Land and Water in Low-Down California, won the first Clements Prize in 1999. (DeBuys was the Carl B. and Florence E. King Senior Fellow in Southwest History at the Clements Center in 1999-2000.) Another work, River of Traps: A New Mexico Mountain Life, was a finalist for the 1991 Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction. He has also written Enchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range, The Walk, and Seeing Things Whole: The Essential John Wesley Powell.

An active conservationist, deBuys was the founding chairman of the Valles Caldera Trust (2001-04), which manages the 89,000-acre Valles Caldera National Preserve in northern New Mexico. He has helped protect more than 150,000 acres in New Mexico, Arizona and North Carolina. He lives and writes on a small farm in northern New Mexico.

Since 1999, the Clements Center for Southwest Studies has presented the award as the William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America. The prize was named for the former Texas governor and the Center’s founding benefactor, who passed away in May 2011.

In spring 2012, the Center approached the Western History Association (WHA) about taking over the administration of the prize as a way to honor both Governor Clements and David J. Weber, the Center’s founding director and past WHA president, who passed away in August 2010. The Weber-Clements Book Prize is now presented by the WHA Council and the Clements Center and is now administered by the WHA.

The $2,500 Weber-Clements Book Prize honors fine writing and original research on the American Southwest. The competition is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 13, 2012

Tate Lecture: The third Tate lecture of the semester will feature Jane McGonigal, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. McGonigal is the author of Reality is Broken and is known as a visionary in the gaming world. Her lecture will focus on the idea of applying the gamer spirit to the problems that we face in the 21st century. The student forum is at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom and the lecture is at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

MJO: The Meadows School of the Arts invites you to hear the Meadows Jazz Orchestra in a free concert Tuesday, Nov. 13. The ensemble will perform works focused on the traditions of large ensemble jazz as well as new works by Director Akira Sato and Meadows faculty and students. Sato is a trumpet player, arranger and composer and has directed the Meadows Jazz Orchestra at SMU since 2011. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Take a stand: The SMU Debate program presents a public debate on energy, Wednesday, Nov. 14. This event is free and open to the public for observation as well as participation. The debate starts at 6 p.m. in the O’Donnell Hall, Owen Arts Center (Room 2130).

Mexico’s melting pot: Clements Fellow Ruben Flores will speak on the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution and Mexico’s efforts to create a unified nation in the Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture Series Wednesday, Nov. 14. Flores is at SMU completing his manuscript The Beloved Communities: Mexico’s Melting Pot and the Making of American Civil Rights. The lecture starts at noon in the Texana Room of the Degolyer Library. Don’t forget your lunch!

Levine Lecture: Shalem Center founder Yoram Hazony visits SMU for a Levine Lecture in Jewish Studies Thursday, Nov. 15. Hazony, president of the Center’s Institute for Advanced Studies, will focus his lecture on whether the Bible can be read as a work of philosophy in narrative form. After the lecture Dr. Hazony’s most recent book will be available for purchase and signing. The lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Please contact Rabbi Heidi Cortez  for more information.

Image c/o Steve Hofstetter

Looking for a laugh: The Program Council invites you to a night of stand-up comedy: Steve Hofstetter, know as the man of “comedy without apology,” is coming to SMU Thursday, Nov. 15. Hofstetter has appeared on numerous national TV shows, has written three books and released three albums. He is a columnist with College Humor and visits over 100 colleges every year. The stand-up starts at 8 p.m. in the Hughes Trigg Theater.

In C: SYZYGY and DJ Dennis DeSantis invite SMU to a collaborative remix performance of Terry Riley’s In C. On Friday, Nov. 16, the sounds of pianos, percussion, strings, winds and singers will be heard with DJ DeSantis and Meadows ensemble director Mat Albert. This unique performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center, and is $7 for faculty, staff and students

2009 Clements Book Prize winner to speak at SMU Nov. 8, 2012

Louise PubolsLouise Pubols (right), chief curator of history at the Oakland Museum of California, will visit SMU to discuss her award-winning work as an author. The University’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies hosts Pubols for a 6 p.m. reception followed by a 6:30 p.m. lecture Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, in DeGolyer Library.

Pubols won the 2009 Clements Book Prize, presented by the Clements Center, for The Father of All: The De La Guerra Family, Power, and Patriarchy in Mexican California, published by the University of California Press and the Huntington Library.

> SMU Forum: Pubols’ family saga wins 2009 Clements Book Prize

Her work explores the history of the de la Guerras of Santa Barbara, a powerful California family that adapted and thrived through several major economic and political upheavals, including the U.S.-Mexican War. Through the de la Guerras’ political, business and family relationships, Pubols illustrated how patriarchy functioned from generation to generation in Spanish and Mexican California.

Book cover for 'The Father of All' by Louise Pubols

In 2010, SMU Professor of History Ben Johnson hailed the prize-winning book as “gracefully written and deeply researched. Pubols both draws on and contributes to a generation of historical scholarship on the U.S. West and Latin America alike.

“Popular understanding and scholarly arguments alike treat the Mexican North – the area that now constitutes the U.S. states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California – as a sleepy backwater in comparison to the dynamic young United States,” Johnson added. “Pubols’ close study of politics and society in Mexican California really demolishes this view. She shows how Mexican liberalism, unleashed by that young nation’s independence, transformed California’s economy, family life and politics.”

“Using a micro-historical approach – in this case, the story of a single family – Pubols is able to tell a story that is at once both big and small, placing the experiences of the de la Guerras within the wider sweep of events that remade North America during the first half of the 19th century,” says Associate Professor of History and Clements Center Director Andrew Graybill. “The Father of All is a brilliant contribution to the literature on the American Southwest and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands.”

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 21, 2012

Ilona Romule: Creamer Horse (courtesy of Ferrin Gallery)

Art smart: Ceramicist Ilona Romule will be at SMU Monday, Sept. 24, to give the Meadows Visiting Artist Lecture. Romule’s unique work is simultaneously two-and three-dimensional: She draws figures on the sides of her pots and sculpts them partially emerging from the pots as three-dimensional forms. She is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics and has participated in international competitions and exhibitions. The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. in the Greer Garson Screening Room of the Owen Arts Center and is free to the public.

SYZGY: The Meadows new music ensemble SYZGY will open its 2012-13 season Friday, Sept. 28 with a program featuring work by composer John Adams and led by ensemble director Matt Albert. The strings, winds and percussions can be heard at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Raúl Coronado

“We the Pueblo of Texas”: The Gilbert Lecture Series kicks off at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, with an event focused on Latino studies and hosted by Raúl Coronado. Coronado is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago, a past resident of SMU as a Bill and Rita Clements Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America, and the author of A World Not to Come: A History of 19th-Century Latino Writing, Print Culture, and the Disenchantment of the World. Coronado is currently working on a study of the historical emergence of queer Latino/a subjectivities; hear all of his insights in DeGolyer Library.

True to Texas: Y’all are in for a treat, because the 2012 State Fair of Texas begins Friday, Sept. 28 and runs daily through Saturday, Oct. 21. The fair kicks off with a ceremony at 7 a.m. and a parade through downtown Dallas at noon. Highlights include the Reliant Starlight Parade, the State Fair Auto Show, livestock shows, the U.S. Marine Drum and Bugle Corps, the Chevrolet Main Stage featuring artists like Kellie Pickler and Kevin Fowler, and all the fried food your heart desires. General admission is $16; call 214-565-9931 for more information.

Faculty artistry: Chee-Yun Kim and Alessio Bax are more than SMU faculty members: They are also internationally renowned musicians who have won the Avery Fisher Career Grant. At 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, Chee-Yun will play the violin and Bax the piano as they perform pieces from composers Ferruccio Busoni and Beethoven as part of the Faculty Artist and Distinguished Alumni Recital Series. The performance is in Caruth Auditorium and costs $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

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