Calendar Highlights: Nov. 13, 2012

Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture Series

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 13, 2012

Tate Lecture: The third Tate lecture of the semester will feature Jane McGonigal, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. McGonigal is the author of Reality is Broken and is known as a visionary in the gaming world. Her lecture will focus on the idea of applying the gamer spirit to the problems that we face in the 21st century. The student forum is at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom and the lecture is at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

MJO: The Meadows School of the Arts invites you to hear the Meadows Jazz Orchestra in a free concert Tuesday, Nov. 13. The ensemble will perform works focused on the traditions of large ensemble jazz as well as new works by Director Akira Sato and Meadows faculty and students. Sato is a trumpet player, arranger and composer and has directed the Meadows Jazz Orchestra at SMU since 2011. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Take a stand: The SMU Debate program presents a public debate on energy, Wednesday, Nov. 14. This event is free and open to the public for observation as well as participation. The debate starts at 6 p.m. in the O’Donnell Hall, Owen Arts Center (Room 2130).

Mexico’s melting pot: Clements Fellow Ruben Flores will speak on the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution and Mexico’s efforts to create a unified nation in the Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture Series Wednesday, Nov. 14. Flores is at SMU completing his manuscript The Beloved Communities: Mexico’s Melting Pot and the Making of American Civil Rights. The lecture starts at noon in the Texana Room of the Degolyer Library. Don’t forget your lunch!

Levine Lecture: Shalem Center founder Yoram Hazony visits SMU for a Levine Lecture in Jewish Studies Thursday, Nov. 15. Hazony, president of the Center’s Institute for Advanced Studies, will focus his lecture on whether the Bible can be read as a work of philosophy in narrative form. After the lecture Dr. Hazony’s most recent book will be available for purchase and signing. The lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Please contact Rabbi Heidi Cortez  for more information.

Image c/o Steve Hofstetter

Looking for a laugh: The Program Council invites you to a night of stand-up comedy: Steve Hofstetter, know as the man of “comedy without apology,” is coming to SMU Thursday, Nov. 15. Hofstetter has appeared on numerous national TV shows, has written three books and released three albums. He is a columnist with College Humor and visits over 100 colleges every year. The stand-up starts at 8 p.m. in the Hughes Trigg Theater.

In C: SYZYGY and DJ Dennis DeSantis invite SMU to a collaborative remix performance of Terry Riley’s In C. On Friday, Nov. 16, the sounds of pianos, percussion, strings, winds and singers will be heard with DJ DeSantis and Meadows ensemble director Mat Albert. This unique performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center, and is $7 for faculty, staff and students

November 13, 2012|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 23, 2012

Happy Homecoming Week!

Beer advertising art from the turn of the the 20th centuryBrown Bag Lecture: SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies presents a 2012 Brown Bag Lecture that explores beer beyond the bar and focuses on the activities of the St. Louis brewers as an integral part of a regional cultural economy at the turn of the 20th century. Paula Lupkin, professor of art history at the University of North Texas, will discuss “A Lager Landscape: The Cultural Economy of Beer in the Great Southwest” at noon Wednesday, Oct. 24 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer library. Don’t forget to bring your lunch!

Classical elements: The Meadows School of the Arts invites you to an afternoon of opera. The Meadows Opera Theatre will explore the four elements – earth, air, fire and water – through one-act operas and scenes from opera and musical theatre beginning at 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26, in the Bob Hope Theatre Lobby.

October 23, 2012|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 15, 2011

Kit Carson tombstone in Kit Carson Park Memorial Cemetery, Taos, New MexicoInto the west: Clements Center Fellow Susan Lee Johnson uses her study of amateur Kit Carson historians Quantrille McClung and Bernice Blackwelder and their published works to map relationships between women historians and male historical subjects, and between professional and nonprofessional U.S. western historians, at a key moment in the 20th century. She will present a Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture, “Bury My Hero at Wounded Knee: Gender, Race, and Historical Practice in the Long 1970s,” at noon Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Johnson, a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is completing her new book, A Traffic in Men: The Old Maid, the Housewife, and Their Great Westerner. Presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. (Right, tombstone in Kit Carson Park Memorial Cemetery, Taos, New Mexico.)

Cover of 'The Ten Lost Tribes: A World History'A secret history: Renowned historian and author Zvi Ben-Dor Benite will present the 11th Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Benite, professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies and acting director of the Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University, will discuss “The Truly Other Jewish World History: The Ten Lost Tribes Between Jews and Christians.” His subject is a little-known but intriguing episode of early 16th-century Jewish and Christian history, in which Pope Clement VII and the Ten Tribes (almost) defeated Islam and won the Holy Land. Benite’s 2009 book, The Ten Lost Tribes: A World History, traces the legends surrounding the ancient Israelite tribes that were exiled by the Assyrians in the 8th century BCE and vanished from the pages of history, but not from popular imagination. For more information, contact Serge Frolov, 214-768-4478.

Art for sale: Update that holiday gift list – SMU’s Hamon Arts Library holds its 2011 Book Sale at 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday Nov. 17-18 in the Hamon Arts Library, Owen Arts Center. Items for sale include music scores; CDs; DVDs and laserdiscs; and, of course, books on art, music, theater, dance and film, as well as fiction titles. Most items are priced between $1 and $10, and all have no sales tax – plus, the Library will take an additional 50% off all items after 3 p.m. Friday. All sales are final, cash or check only. No holds, bulk discounts or previews. For more information, contact the Hamon circulation desk at 214-768-3813.

November 15, 2011|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 15, 2011

Joshua Cooper RamoTate Series welcomes China expert: Author, journalist and strategic adviser Joshua Cooper Ramo will give the Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture in SMU’s 2010-11 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series at 8 p.m. Feb. 15 in McFarlin Auditorium. Called “one of China’s leading foreign-born scholars” by The World Economic Forum, Ramo served as China analyst for NBC during the 2008 Olympic Games and as the youngest-ever Foreign Editor of TIME magazine. In his 2009 book, The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us And What We Can Do About It, Ramo argues that instead of relying on traditional models and institutions, people and nations must adapt to an age of unprecedented global change with innovative solutions and creative problem-solving. Ramo will answer questions from the SMU community and local high school students during the Tate Lecture Series Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Admission to the Student Forum is free. For more information, call Program Services at 214-768-8283 (214-SMU-TATE).

Dance, dance, revolution: American studies scholar Jason Mellard, a postdoctoral Fellow of SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss the cultural politics of 1970s Texas in the next Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture. Mellard, the Summerlee Fellow for the Study of Texas History, will present “Bull Chic: Urban Cowboy, Saturday Night Fever, and Seventies Discourses of Region, Class and Gender” at noon Feb. 16 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Mellard examines the narratives of the two popular ’70s films as primers on an American sense of region, and the importance of place, in a moment in which the social mobility preached by both movies came under considerable strain. Bring your lunch. For more information, visit the Clements Center website.

February 15, 2011|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 22, 2009

'Tainted Souls and Painted Faces' book coverGilbert Lecture Series: Johns Hopkins University Professor Amanda Anderson (Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture) will discuss the role of political ideology in the works of authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell and Anthony Trollope in “Politics and the 19th-Century British Novel” Sept. 22 in DeGolyer Library. Reception in the Texana Room at 6 p.m., lecture in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room at 6:30 p.m. Cosponsored by the Department of English and DeGolyer Library. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series homepage.

Turn down the noise: Feeling the burn of too much stress? Learn positive ways to cope at noon Sept. 23 in Room 205, Memorial Health Center. Faculty and staff earn 1 Wellpower credit for attending. Sponsored by Counseling and Psychiatric Services. For more information, contact Marianne Stout.

Celebrating Darwin: Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and The Friends of KERA host a celebration of the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species and the 200th birthday of Charles Darwin Sept. 24 in DeGolyer Library. Guest speakers include Paula Apsell (’08 honoris causa), “NOVA” senior executive producer; and Melanie Wallace, “NOVA” senior series producer. Reception at 10 a.m., lecture at 10:30 a.m. RSVP to 214-768-3225 or Cynthia Ruppi.

'Beyond Nations' by John Chavez, bookcover“Tragic” love: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 6 (“Tragic”) at 8 p.m. Sept. 25 and 3 p.m. Sept. 27 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Clements Center Brown Bag: SMU History Professor John Chávez will discuss his new book tracing the evolution of “peripheral” ethnic homelands around the North Atlantic in “Beyond Nations: Evolving Homelands in the North Atlantic World, 1400-2000.” The event begins at noon Sept. 30 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch.

Sounds of India: The Meadows School of the Arts presents a concert of classical South Indian music with percussionist and Grammy Award nominee Poovalur Srinivasan and his group, Karnatic Kutcherri, at noon Sept. 30 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. The show is part of the Expanding Your Horizons Brown Bag Concert Series. Admission is free; bring your lunch. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

September 22, 2009|Calendar Highlights|
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