A Monday Celebration of Lights kicks off SMU’s 2013 holiday season

Christopher Anderson

A Monday Celebration of Lights kicks off SMU’s 2013 holiday season

SMU holiday lights at night on the Main Quad

The holiday season goes into high gear at SMU with a rare weekday observance of one of the University’s most beloved annual traditions. Celebration of Lights 2013 is scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2 on the Main Quad.

The celebration features than 100,000 decorative lights, luminarias lining the sidewalks, musicians performing songs of the season, and SMU President R. Gerald Turner reading the Christmas story from the New Testament. Refreshments will be served. Check out slideshows and video of past Celebration of Lights ceremonies, courtesy of SMU News. Photos

Other highly anticipated holiday events:

• On Thursday, Dec. 5, SMU’s Perkins School of Theology celebrates its Advent/Christmas Worship Service  at 4 p.m and 8 p.m. in Perkins Chapel with the theme “…A child shall lead.” Children of Perkins faculty and staff members will join Dean William Lawrence and Associate Dean Evelyn Parker as readers for the services. The program also features music from the Perkins Seminary Singers directed by C. Michael Hawn; Meadows School of the Arts’ women’s ensemble, Diva Dolce (4 p.m.), directed by Robert Ward; the Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas’ Women’s Youth Chorus (8 p.m.) directed by Kelly Pfaffenberger; and Perkins organist Christoper Anderson. Admission is free; food and cash donations for the North Texas Food Bank will be accepted in the chapel narthex at the entrance. For more information, contact Teresa Rosado, 214-768-2502.

• President and Mrs. R. Gerald Turner will host their annual All-University Holiday Party from 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, in the Martha Proctor Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

• The Guildhall at SMU hosts its Winter Exhibition on Friday, Dec. 20, at SMU-in-Plano. Graduating students in art creation, level design, production and programming will show their work, and attendees will have the opportunity to play games designed by students in multiple cohorts.

• The University celebrates its 2013 December Commencement Convocation at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 21, in Moody Coliseum. Retired and current faculty members will assemble for procession in academic dress no later than 9:45 a.m. in the Blanton Student Services Building lobby. Prior to the ceremony, a faculty breakfast will be served beginning at 8:45 a.m. in the Blanton Building. RSVP online for the faculty breakfast and processional and learn more about the ceremony.

November 25, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 17, 2009

Jane Buikstra“Darwin’s Evolving Legacy” lecture: Jane Buikstra (left), Regents’ Professor of Bioarchaeology and director of the Center for Bioarchaeological Research at Arizona State University, will give the Wendorf Distinguished Lecture in Archaeology. She will speak on “Tuberculosis: a Deep Time Perspective” at 5 p.m. Nov. 19 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

“Holocaust Legacies” series continues: SMU professors Virginia Dupuy (Meadows School of the Arts), Christopher Anderson (Perkins School of Theology) and John Holbert (Perkins School of Theology) present “Music Out of the Ashes,” a lecture/performance focusing on Victor Ullmann’s opera Der Kaiser von Atlantis, written in the Theresienstadt concentration camp but not performed until the 1970s. The evening will include scenes from the opera interspersed with commentary about the camp, the music and the composer and takes place 6-10 p.m. Nov. 19 in the Great Hall, Perkins Prothro Hall.

Meadows World Music EnsembleWorld music: Imaginative improvisation and plenty of jamming are part of the performance for the Meadows World Music Ensemble (right), directed by Jamal Mohamed. The group performs traditional works and original compositions at 8 p.m. Nov. 19 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public.

Chamber Music Honors Concert: The Meadows School of the Arts presents its most outstanding chamber music ensembles, performing a range of works composed for trios, quartets and quintets. The concert takes place at 8 p.m. Nov. 21 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public.

For a song: The Meadows Chorale and Concert Choir present “The Spirit Rejoices” at 8 p.m. Nov. 22 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. In lieu of admission, the choirs request voluntary donations to the North Texas Food Bank – give online or at the concert. For more information, call the Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

November 17, 2009|Calendar Highlights|

New lecture series explores Holocaust’s lingering impact

'Holocaust Legacies' posterSMU’s Human Rights Education Program is cosponsoring a three-month series of lectures, symposiums, film screenings, photography exhibits and musical performances examining how the Holocaust continues to affect the world.

“Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” begins Sept. 9 with a 7 p.m. reception and a 7:30 p.m. introductory panel discussion in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The program will run through the end of November with events held both on and off the SMU campus, and all events are free and open to the public.

Panel members on Sept. 9 will include Christopher Anderson, associate professor of sacred music in Perkins School of Theology; Janis Bergman-Carton, art history chair in Meadows School of the Arts; Elliott Dlin, executive director of the Dallas Holocaust Museum; Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program and Tom Mayo, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Halperin, who each December escorts educational groups to former Nazi death camp locations in Poland, is committed to raising awareness of what he calls “the crime within the war,” even as the number of people who lived through the war, and the Holocaust, dwindles with each passing year. September marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II.

“It’s safe to say most Americans don’t think about World War II any more,” Halperin said. “We fought the war, defeated the Nazis, and came home the good guys. We mushroomed into a world power. Most Americans since then have lived a relatively safe and comfortable life.”

But the legacy of the Holocaust continues at many levels, Halperin said: The Nazis committed the greatest art theft in history, looting the collections of Jewish families whose descendents are still litigating to see their treasures returned. All major war crime tribunals bear the stamp of the post-World War II Nuremburg Trials, and the United States in May deported a nearly 90-year-old man, John Demjanjuk, for Nazi war crimes.

Halperin noted that in Europe, sensitivity to the Shoah’s legacy is reflected even in restrictions to how people talk and write about the Nazi regime. “You can buy a copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf in the SMU Book Store – that’s free speech,” Halperin explained. “You can deny the Holocaust in the U.S., and that’s free speech, too. You can’t do that in Europe.” Halperin said he expects the series to be “a powerful, emotional, somber and sobering series of events.”

Co-sponsors for the 2009 Fall Program Series are SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Perkins School of Theology, TCU’s Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work and the University of Dallas.

Find a complete schedule at the SMU News site

September 8, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
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