Centennial Campaign

$1.5 million gift establishes SMU endowed chair in the legal rights and protection of children

Jack D. Knox

Jack D. Knox ’60, ’63

A $1.5 million gift from North Texas business leader Jack D. Knox ’60 ’63 will establish a new endowed professorship in SMU’s Dedman School of Law.

The Jack Knox Chair in the Rights and Protection of Children will support teaching, research and publishing on legal issues related to protecting the welfare and legal rights of children.

“Jack Knox’s gift will enable the law school to further its teaching and scholarship on children’s rights,” said SMU Judge James Noel Dean and Professor of Law Jennifer M. Collins. Dean Collins joined the Law School in July 2014 as an academic leader and nationally recognized scholar on the intersection of family and criminal law. “Endowment gifts like this provide critical support for our commitment to excellence in the classroom and continued cutting-edge, impactful work by our faculty.”

“We are deeply grateful to Mr. Knox for his gift, which not only will make a difference in the lives of children but also will advance the academic offerings of one of the nation’s top law schools,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Our law graduates will be more aware of the important social and personal issues affecting children and will be trained in protecting their legal rights.”

Knox, a native of Weatherford, Texas, received a B.A. degree in English from SMU in 1960 and a J.D. degree from what is now Dedman School of Law in 1963. In 2011, Knox was honored with the Robert G. Storey Award for Distinguished Achievement, the highest honor bestowed by the Law School. He is general partner of Six Flags Over Texas Fund Ltd., a private limited investment group overseeing real estate assets of Six Flags Over Texas. He also is owner of Café Pacific Restaurants Inc., parent company of the popular restaurant, which has been based in Dallas’ Highland Park Village for 34 years.

“It’s an honor to help my alma mater empower the next generation of legal professionals by providing them with a strong understanding of what the issues are and the knowledge and drive to develop better laws and policies to protect children’s welfare and rights,” Knox said.

The Jack Knox Chair counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, and advances the campaign’s goal to reach 110 endowed faculty positions. To date the campaign has raised more than $902 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

$2 million gift will create Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair in Electrical Engineering in SMU’s Lyle School

Templeton Centennial Chair gift announcement

At the Templeton gift announcement (l.to r.): SMU Board of Trustees Chair Michael M. Boone, SMU President R. Gerald Turner, Mrs. Gail Turner, Richard Templeton, Mary Templeton, daughter Stephanie Templeton, engineering student Elizabeth (Liz) Dubret, Lyle Engineering School Dean Marc Christensen, and Brad Cheves, SMU Vice President for Development and External Affairs.

A gift of $2 million from Mary and Richard Templeton will create a new endowed faculty position in electrical engineering in SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.

The gift establishing the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering provides for a $1.5 million endowment and $500,000 in operational support.

The special “Centennial” designation underscores the foresight of donors who recognize the need for operational funds to allow immediate impact while the endowment matures.

“This commitment is meaningful because it comes from a family of engineers who understand the reach of science and technology,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Templetons know better than most how their gift will help SMU attract outstanding faculty in this important engineering discipline, and how it will influence students and prepare them to contribute to the engineering profession.”

Richard Templeton is president and CEO of Texas Instruments, and Mary Templeton is a computer scientist. They were together on the SMU campus last May as Mr. Templeton delivered the commencement address at the Lyle School and as their son, Jim, received his own bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering.

“The SMU formula for success is to combine bright, motivated students with talented, innovative faculty members,” said SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden. “This gift of an endowed chair gives us the ability to attract and support a strong, academic leader in the field of electrical engineering.”

The search to fill the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering is underway.

“An outstanding faculty member can spark creative ideas in a student who goes on to change the world with an invention, or lead research that reveals a different way of looking at an old problem,” said Mr. Templeton. “It means a great deal to us to be able to help support that kind of educator.”

“Jim had such a wonderful experience at SMU that we want to help ensure the same access to superior faculty members for students who come after him,” said Mrs. Templeton.

The gift to fund the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, and toward the campaign’s goal to reach 110 endowed faculty positions. To date the campaign has raised more than $902 million in gifts and pledges to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story from SMU News

SMU Founders’ Day 2014 celebration to include historic faculty salute and photo

Year of the Faculty logoFull-time SMU faculty members and faculty emeriti have an opportunity to be part of a historic Centennial salute on Friday, April 11, 2014.

They are invited to join Board of Trustees Chair Caren Prothro, President and Mrs. R. Gerald Turner and Provost and Mrs. Paul Ludden for a group photo at 4:30 p.m. in Moody Coliseum. The photo will be used in the University’s official Centennial history; business attire is required. Shuttle transportation will run to Moody Coliseum beginning at 3:45 p.m.

After the photo session, full-time and emeritus faculty members are invited to participate in the Centennial Faculty Reception at 5 p.m. and the President’s Briefing and Centennial Faculty Salute at 6 p.m.

Find more information at smu.edu/rsvp/facultysalute.

Family Weekend 2012: Boardwalk on the Boulevard

Expect the Boulevard to be packed this weekend; a record number of SMU families have registered to attend Family Weekend 2012, Sept. 28-30.

This year’s theme is Boardwalk on the Boulevard; President R. Gerald Turner said the theme “reflects the range of activities the students have planned for you to enjoy, from our talent show to Boulevarding before the Mustangs take on TCU.”

Antonea Bastian, Student Foundation’s Family Weekend chair, said, “Families are a very important part of our community, and this weekend is about celebrating them.”

Student Foundation put together a guide for the weekend and below are some of the highlights:

Friday, Sept. 28:

  • To kick off the weekend there will be a behind-the-scenes tour of Ford Stadium at 10 and 11 a.m.
  • Following the tour there is a family luncheon in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom at noon.
  • Families have the chance to Meet the Faculty of each school in their respective buildings at 2 p.m.
  • The evening holds two favorite traditions: the Taste of Dallas Dinner at 6 p.m. and the Talent Show at 8 p.m. Tickets to the show are $10 in advance and $12 at the door.

Saturday, Sept. 29:

  • This year’s Family Weekend is happening during the Second Century Celebration, so make sure to stop by the Centennial Hall Open House in the lower level of Hughes-Trigg from 3-6 p.m. for a family photo.
  • The annual BBQ on the Boulevard will start at 4 p.m. and kick off all Boulevarding activities.
  • As the boulevard winds down, head to Ford Stadium for the football game against TCU, the Battle for the Iron Skillet!
  • A Quick Look at The Battle for the Iron Skillet:
    • The game starts at 6 p.m. and will be broadcast on Fox Sports
    • The rivalry dates back to 1915
    • SMU won their first game over TCU in 1923
    • TCU currently leads the series 44-40-7
    • The last time the Mustangs and Horned Frogs met, SMU was victorious with a 40-33 win in overtime

Sunday, Sept. 30:

  • SMU celebrates Catholic Mass at 9 a.m. and All-University Worship at 11 a.m.
  • Meadows Museum will be open free of charge from 1-5 p.m. It will be a great time to catch the Meadows’ latest blockbuster exhibition (and collaboration with the Prado), Diego Velázquez: The Early Court Portraits.

SMU graduates honor Jeremy Adams with endowed professorship

SMU History Professor Jeremy Adams

Jeremy duQuesnay Adams

Two SMU graduates are showing appreciation for a professor who made a lasting impact on their lives by establishing an endowed professorship in his honor.

The $1.25 million gift from Stephen L. and Kathryn Hedges Arata of Dallas will create the Jeremy duQuesnay Adams Centennial Professorship in Western European Medieval History in honor of the longtime SMU professor, who will continue to teach in the University’s Clements Department of History.

“We are honored to have an endowed professorship bearing the name of one of SMU’s most distinguished and revered faculty members,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are grateful to the Aratas for their vision and generosity in providing this gift, which supports our Second Century Campaign goal to increase the number of endowed chairs to 100. With the Adams Professorship, the University is within 15 faculty positions of reaching that goal.”

Several other former students of Professor Adams have contributed toward the endowed professorship in his honor. Those contributing $25,000 and more include Cindy and Dr. David Stager Jr. ’87; Jo ’90 and Joe Goyne; and Renee Justice Standley ’90 and Kenneth Standley.

Both the Aratas majored in English and minored in medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College. Kathryn earned her B.A. degree in 1987 and an M.A. in English from SMU in 1991. Stephen received two degrees from SMU in 1988 — a B.A. from Dedman College and B.B.A. from Cox School of Business. He also earned a Master’s of Management degree from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Kathryn Arata said, “My parents, the Rev. Bill B. Hedges and Jane Hedges, graduated from SMU in 1960. All of my life I have loved this university, growing up steeped in the SMU culture and history. When I finally arrived on the campus, I was captivated by the quality and variety of the courses offered.

“Jeremy Adams created a sense of academic curiosity and desire for learning that I possess to this day. Now that Stephen and I are in a position to pay back (actually pay forward) the gifts he gave us, we wanted to do something that would be close to Jeremy’s heart. He is passionate about his subject, and we have given this endowment to ensure that his passion will continue to light the fires of academic curiosity in students for years to come.”

The Adams Professorship is the first Centennial Professorship to be established in Dedman College. The “Centennial” designation is a special gift category during SMU’s 100th anniversary commemoration, 2011-15. It requires that gifts meet elevated giving levels and provide a combination of endowment and annual support. Because a faculty position designated as “Centennial” enables the appointment to be made sooner, SMU has initiated a search to fill the Adams Professorship in the 2013-14 academic year.

> Read the full story from SMU News

$5 million gift will establish Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute

Dallas Hall and Dedman College gateway monument at SMUA new $5 million gift from the Dedman family and The Dedman Foundation will create the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

The new institute will bring together faculty and students from the humanities, sciences and social sciences for collaborative research and other programs. The Institute’s projects will also reach beyond Dedman College to the broader University and the Dallas-Fort Worth region.

Unlike interdisciplinary centers at other universities, the Institute will engage undergraduates as well as graduate students and faculty.

“SMU has benefited from the Dedman family’s extraordinary vision and support for more than five decades,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Few other families have had such a wide-ranging impact on the University’s development. Their major gifts have supported areas from humanities and sciences to law and lifetime sports. As we celebrate the University’s Centennial, this latest gift will help SMU continue to move forward among the nation’s leading universities.”

The institute will host annual seminars bringing together faculty, graduate and undergraduate students and members of the community to discuss global issues. Informal research clusters will create collaborative groups of faculty and students from across the University to expand and enrich the interdisciplinary culture on campus. Interdisciplinary faculty appointments will develop new programming and curricular offerings, and a digital humanities lab will provide state-of-the-art computing technologies and interactive space for scholars to pursue interdisciplinary research.

Institute seminars and research clusters will generate capstone courses, a vital component of the new University Curriculum. In addition to deepening and broadening course selection, the Institute will allow Dedman College to offer students more opportunities for engaged learning beyond the classroom.

“Addressing the complex challenges of our interconnected world requires the knowledge and perspectives of more than one discipline,” said Dedman College Dean William Tsutsui. “The Institute is a perfect fit for a college that spans departments from philosophy to physics. By creating opportunities for substantive collaboration across the disciplines, the Institute will open new vistas for research and help prepare students for real-world challenges requiring multiple perspectives.”

Caroline BrettellDedman College will appoint Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, as the first director of the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute. Brettell has conducted research on international migration in Portugal, France and the United States, and for the last decade has studied new immigration in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, she also is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of 14 books.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Loyds make $5 million gift toward SMU’s Residential Commons

SMU Residential Commons Rendering 2012Paul B. Loyd Jr. ’68 and his wife, Penny Requa Loyd, are continuing their longtime support of SMU with a $5 million gift toward one of five new Residential Commons buildings designed to enhance SMU’s living-learning environment. Their gift was announced during SMU Founders’ Day Weekend at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Commons complex, scheduled to open in fall 2014.

Including this gift, the Loyds’ contributions to SMU have supported a variety of initiatives, most notably SMU Football’s Circle of Champions, the Mustang Band Hall, Meadows School of the Arts scholarships, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon House Fund, and the Paul B. Loyd, Jr. All-Sports Center, adjacent to Gerald J. Ford Stadium. The center, which opened in 2000 with Ford Stadium, houses locker rooms, offices, training and sports medicine facilities for SMU’s 17 sports teams.

The Loyds also provided funding in support of the new Penny and Paul Loyd Center for the Academic Development of Student Athletes (ADSA), housed in the All-Sports Center, which helps student-athletes maximize their athletic and academic potential.

“Nearly every SMU student benefits from the Loyd family’s generosity,” says SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “From students enhancing their study skills and preparing for exams at the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center and the ADSA, to student athletes working out in the weight room, all in the Loyd All-Sports Center, the Loyds have enhanced the campus experience of SMU students. Now a new generation of students will enjoy living and learning in the Loyd Commons.”

Construction on the Residential Commons complex is under way in the southeast corner of the main campus, near Ford Stadium and the future George W. Bush Presidential Center. The complex will provide housing, parking and dining facilities for 1,250 students, enabling all first- and second-year SMU students to live on campus. Each residential facility will include a faculty residence and offices, classrooms and seminar rooms.

The Loyds serve as members of the SMU Parent Leadership Council. As of the May 2012 graduation of their daughter, three of their five children are SMU graduates. Kelly Loyd graduated in 1996 with a B.S. in economics. Jessica Requa earned in 2008 a B.A. in psychology and a B.B.A. in accounting as well as an M.S. in accounting in 2009. Sarah Requa received a B.A. degree in markets and culture and a B.A. in psychology at SMU’s 2012 Commencement.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

Gift from Crain Foundation to provide Centennial Promenade at SMU

Crane Promenade at SMU

Artist's rendering of the eastern border of SMU's main campus. The location of the new Crain Family Centennial Promenade is indicated by the blue box.

A gift from The Crain Foundation will help create a pedestrian walkway linking SMU’s Hughes-Trigg Student Center on the north with the new Residential Commons complex to be built on the southern end of the campus.

The Crain Family Centennial Promenade will add a visible and convenient passageway for the campus community and visitors to sites including the George W. Bush Presidential Center, Moody Coliseum, Collins Executive Education Center and Blanton Student Services Building.

“Crain family members have long-standing ties to SMU, and we are grateful for their vision and generosity in providing this beautiful addition to the campus,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Crain Family Centennial Promenade will serve as an appropriate capstone to new construction taking place now and into 2015, when we celebrate the 100th anniversary of SMU’s opening.

“In addition to the quality of SMU’s programs, the beauty of our campus is a major attraction to prospective students,” Turner added. “The addition of this promenade makes the campus more pedestrian-friendly, an attribute that helps build a sense of community.”

The Crain Foundation previously gave funds for construction of the fountain on the east plaza of the Blanton Student Services Building, which opened in 2003. The Ann Lacy Crain Fountain is the focal point of the intersection of SMU Boulevard and Airline Road.

The Crain Foundation gift counts toward the $750 million goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised more than $610 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience. The campaign is part of SMU’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the University’s founding in 1911 and its opening in 1915.

Read the full story from SMU News

$5 million gift will help renovate SMU’s Memorial Health Center

SMU Memorial Health CenterSMU’s 52-year-old Memorial Health Center is set to receive a major upgrade, and it will be renamed in honor of the distinguished Dallas pediatrician and University alumnus whose foundation is making it possible.

The Dr. Bob and Jean Smith Foundation has given $5 million toward the Dr. Bob Smith Health Center. Planning for the Center’s renovation will begin this year.

The Memorial Health Center opened in 1960 as a 30-bed infirmary. At the time, the University’s enrollment was around 8,000. Today the Health Center serves as an outpatient facility for approximately 11,000 students, about 2,400 of whom live on campus.

Upon its completion in 2014, the Dr. Bob Smith Health Center will serve an estimated 3,650 students living on campus, including those who will live in the new Residential Commons complex to begin construction this spring. The complex, accommodating 1,250 students, in addition to SMU’s current residential halls, will enable the University to implement a two-year residency requirement for all first-year and sophomore students.

“Bob and Jean Smith have a long history of generous support for SMU priorities and have always kept the welfare of students uppermost in their minds,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This new gift will dramatically improve campus health care resources and provide support services that enable students to do their best academic work and fully enjoy the campus experience. We are deeply grateful for this gift, which will transform an important but outmoded facility into an up-to-date campus resource.”

SMU’s Health Center currently provides medical services for diagnosis and treatment of illness and injury, along with counseling and psychiatric services. The Center is staffed by full-time physicians, mental health counselors, registered nurses, pharmacists and laboratory and X-ray technologists. It also houses SMU’s Center for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention.

“It is an honor to align the Dr. Bob and Jean Smith Foundation with SMU in combining superior academic facilities with excellent student life resources,” said Sally Smith Mashburn, Foundation president and treasurer and daughter of Dr. Bob and Jean Smith. “After all, one of SMU’s greatest responsibilities is to nurture the well-being of students.”

Improvements for the Dr. Bob Smith Health Center include updated floor plans that will increase the number of patient procedure rooms, counseling offices and private waiting rooms and will better serve the needs of students with disabilities. The renovation also includes upgrades to medical equipment and technology and enhancement of pharmacy and laboratory spaces. The expansion will provide group meeting spaces to promote collaboration among health care staff members.

“The renovations and upgraded equipment will greatly augment our ability to serve the SMU student community, complementing the high-quality staff members and specialists already in place,” said Patrick Hite, SMU Health Center executive director.

“This will be a lasting tribute to a physician and leader whose main concern was the health and welfare of others,” said Lori White, vice president for student affairs. “Now our students will be the beneficiaries not only of his generosity but also his foresight in understanding their needs and fostering a caring community.”

The Smith Foundation’s new $5 million gift counts toward the $750 million goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which as of December 2011 has raised more than $574 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

> Read more from SMU News
> Visit the SMU Memorial Health Center online

SMU breaks ground for Caruth Hall 2.0

New Caruth Hall renderingEngineering education at SMU took a major step forward May 9 with groundbreaking for the School of Engineering’s new Caruth Hall. To date, commitments totaling more than $18.4 million toward a goal of $22 million have been received for the building project.

The W. W. Caruth, Jr. Foundation of Communities Foundation of Texas has committed $7.5 million toward the new building, which will be constructed on the site of the original Caruth Hall, the home of SMU’s School of Engineering since 1948. New gifts include $4 million from Robert Palmer of Houston, $2 million from the Hillcrest Foundation of Dallas and $1.5 million from the J. E. and L. E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa.

The building will be constructed to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Standards of environmentally conscious design and will include more than 64,000 square feet of space for teaching, research and innovation – nearly double the size of the current facility. It will serve as home to the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education at SMU, as well as the Department of Engineering Management, Information and Systems, and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

“The new Caruth Hall will provide visible evidence of the growing national significance of SMU’s School of Engineering,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are deeply grateful for the vision and generosity of these donors in providing facilities that support our efforts to develop a national center for educating engineers who will be future leaders in the global economy.”

Read more from SMU News.
Watch video from the groundbreaking.

By | 2008-05-15T11:33:34+00:00 May 15, 2008|Categories: News|Tags: , |
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