$1.5 million gift establishes SMU endowed chair in the legal rights and protection of children

Centennial Campaign

$1.5 million gift establishes SMU endowed chair in the legal rights and protection of children

Jack D. Knox

Jack D. Knox ’60, ’63

A $1.5 million gift from North Texas business leader Jack D. Knox ’60 ’63 will establish a new endowed professorship in SMU’s Dedman School of Law.

The Jack Knox Chair in the Rights and Protection of Children will support teaching, research and publishing on legal issues related to protecting the welfare and legal rights of children.

“Jack Knox’s gift will enable the law school to further its teaching and scholarship on children’s rights,” said SMU Judge James Noel Dean and Professor of Law Jennifer M. Collins. Dean Collins joined the Law School in July 2014 as an academic leader and nationally recognized scholar on the intersection of family and criminal law. “Endowment gifts like this provide critical support for our commitment to excellence in the classroom and continued cutting-edge, impactful work by our faculty.”

“We are deeply grateful to Mr. Knox for his gift, which not only will make a difference in the lives of children but also will advance the academic offerings of one of the nation’s top law schools,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Our law graduates will be more aware of the important social and personal issues affecting children and will be trained in protecting their legal rights.”

Knox, a native of Weatherford, Texas, received a B.A. degree in English from SMU in 1960 and a J.D. degree from what is now Dedman School of Law in 1963. In 2011, Knox was honored with the Robert G. Storey Award for Distinguished Achievement, the highest honor bestowed by the Law School. He is general partner of Six Flags Over Texas Fund Ltd., a private limited investment group overseeing real estate assets of Six Flags Over Texas. He also is owner of Café Pacific Restaurants Inc., parent company of the popular restaurant, which has been based in Dallas’ Highland Park Village for 34 years.

“It’s an honor to help my alma mater empower the next generation of legal professionals by providing them with a strong understanding of what the issues are and the knowledge and drive to develop better laws and policies to protect children’s welfare and rights,” Knox said.

The Jack Knox Chair counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, and advances the campaign’s goal to reach 110 endowed faculty positions. To date the campaign has raised more than $902 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

October 24, 2014|News|

$2 million gift will create Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair in Electrical Engineering in SMU’s Lyle School

Templeton Centennial Chair gift announcement

At the Templeton gift announcement (l.to r.): SMU Board of Trustees Chair Michael M. Boone, SMU President R. Gerald Turner, Mrs. Gail Turner, Richard Templeton, Mary Templeton, daughter Stephanie Templeton, engineering student Elizabeth (Liz) Dubret, Lyle Engineering School Dean Marc Christensen, and Brad Cheves, SMU Vice President for Development and External Affairs.

A gift of $2 million from Mary and Richard Templeton will create a new endowed faculty position in electrical engineering in SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.

The gift establishing the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering provides for a $1.5 million endowment and $500,000 in operational support.

The special “Centennial” designation underscores the foresight of donors who recognize the need for operational funds to allow immediate impact while the endowment matures.

“This commitment is meaningful because it comes from a family of engineers who understand the reach of science and technology,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Templetons know better than most how their gift will help SMU attract outstanding faculty in this important engineering discipline, and how it will influence students and prepare them to contribute to the engineering profession.”

Richard Templeton is president and CEO of Texas Instruments, and Mary Templeton is a computer scientist. They were together on the SMU campus last May as Mr. Templeton delivered the commencement address at the Lyle School and as their son, Jim, received his own bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering.

“The SMU formula for success is to combine bright, motivated students with talented, innovative faculty members,” said SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden. “This gift of an endowed chair gives us the ability to attract and support a strong, academic leader in the field of electrical engineering.”

The search to fill the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering is underway.

“An outstanding faculty member can spark creative ideas in a student who goes on to change the world with an invention, or lead research that reveals a different way of looking at an old problem,” said Mr. Templeton. “It means a great deal to us to be able to help support that kind of educator.”

“Jim had such a wonderful experience at SMU that we want to help ensure the same access to superior faculty members for students who come after him,” said Mrs. Templeton.

The gift to fund the Mary and Richard Templeton Centennial Chair of Electrical Engineering counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, and toward the campaign’s goal to reach 110 endowed faculty positions. To date the campaign has raised more than $902 million in gifts and pledges to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story from SMU News

September 24, 2014|News|

SMU Founders’ Day 2014 celebration to include historic faculty salute and photo

Year of the Faculty logoFull-time SMU faculty members and faculty emeriti have an opportunity to be part of a historic Centennial salute on Friday, April 11, 2014.

They are invited to join Board of Trustees Chair Caren Prothro, President and Mrs. R. Gerald Turner and Provost and Mrs. Paul Ludden for a group photo at 4:30 p.m. in Moody Coliseum. The photo will be used in the University’s official Centennial history; business attire is required. Shuttle transportation will run to Moody Coliseum beginning at 3:45 p.m.

After the photo session, full-time and emeritus faculty members are invited to participate in the Centennial Faculty Reception at 5 p.m. and the President’s Briefing and Centennial Faculty Salute at 6 p.m.

Find more information at smu.edu/rsvp/facultysalute.

April 11, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|

Family Weekend 2012: Boardwalk on the Boulevard

Expect the Boulevard to be packed this weekend; a record number of SMU families have registered to attend Family Weekend 2012, Sept. 28-30.

This year’s theme is Boardwalk on the Boulevard; President R. Gerald Turner said the theme “reflects the range of activities the students have planned for you to enjoy, from our talent show to Boulevarding before the Mustangs take on TCU.”

Antonea Bastian, Student Foundation’s Family Weekend chair, said, “Families are a very important part of our community, and this weekend is about celebrating them.”

Student Foundation put together a guide for the weekend and below are some of the highlights:

Friday, Sept. 28:

  • To kick off the weekend there will be a behind-the-scenes tour of Ford Stadium at 10 and 11 a.m.
  • Following the tour there is a family luncheon in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom at noon.
  • Families have the chance to Meet the Faculty of each school in their respective buildings at 2 p.m.
  • The evening holds two favorite traditions: the Taste of Dallas Dinner at 6 p.m. and the Talent Show at 8 p.m. Tickets to the show are $10 in advance and $12 at the door.

Saturday, Sept. 29:

  • This year’s Family Weekend is happening during the Second Century Celebration, so make sure to stop by the Centennial Hall Open House in the lower level of Hughes-Trigg from 3-6 p.m. for a family photo.
  • The annual BBQ on the Boulevard will start at 4 p.m. and kick off all Boulevarding activities.
  • As the boulevard winds down, head to Ford Stadium for the football game against TCU, the Battle for the Iron Skillet!
  • A Quick Look at The Battle for the Iron Skillet:
    • The game starts at 6 p.m. and will be broadcast on Fox Sports
    • The rivalry dates back to 1915
    • SMU won their first game over TCU in 1923
    • TCU currently leads the series 44-40-7
    • The last time the Mustangs and Horned Frogs met, SMU was victorious with a 40-33 win in overtime

Sunday, Sept. 30:

  • SMU celebrates Catholic Mass at 9 a.m. and All-University Worship at 11 a.m.
  • Meadows Museum will be open free of charge from 1-5 p.m. It will be a great time to catch the Meadows’ latest blockbuster exhibition (and collaboration with the Prado), Diego Velázquez: The Early Court Portraits.
September 27, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU graduates honor Jeremy Adams with endowed professorship

SMU History Professor Jeremy Adams

Jeremy duQuesnay Adams

Two SMU graduates are showing appreciation for a professor who made a lasting impact on their lives by establishing an endowed professorship in his honor.

The $1.25 million gift from Stephen L. and Kathryn Hedges Arata of Dallas will create the Jeremy duQuesnay Adams Centennial Professorship in Western European Medieval History in honor of the longtime SMU professor, who will continue to teach in the University’s Clements Department of History.

“We are honored to have an endowed professorship bearing the name of one of SMU’s most distinguished and revered faculty members,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are grateful to the Aratas for their vision and generosity in providing this gift, which supports our Second Century Campaign goal to increase the number of endowed chairs to 100. With the Adams Professorship, the University is within 15 faculty positions of reaching that goal.”

Several other former students of Professor Adams have contributed toward the endowed professorship in his honor. Those contributing $25,000 and more include Cindy and Dr. David Stager Jr. ’87; Jo ’90 and Joe Goyne; and Renee Justice Standley ’90 and Kenneth Standley.

Both the Aratas majored in English and minored in medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College. Kathryn earned her B.A. degree in 1987 and an M.A. in English from SMU in 1991. Stephen received two degrees from SMU in 1988 — a B.A. from Dedman College and B.B.A. from Cox School of Business. He also earned a Master’s of Management degree from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Kathryn Arata said, “My parents, the Rev. Bill B. Hedges and Jane Hedges, graduated from SMU in 1960. All of my life I have loved this university, growing up steeped in the SMU culture and history. When I finally arrived on the campus, I was captivated by the quality and variety of the courses offered.

“Jeremy Adams created a sense of academic curiosity and desire for learning that I possess to this day. Now that Stephen and I are in a position to pay back (actually pay forward) the gifts he gave us, we wanted to do something that would be close to Jeremy’s heart. He is passionate about his subject, and we have given this endowment to ensure that his passion will continue to light the fires of academic curiosity in students for years to come.”

The Adams Professorship is the first Centennial Professorship to be established in Dedman College. The “Centennial” designation is a special gift category during SMU’s 100th anniversary commemoration, 2011-15. It requires that gifts meet elevated giving levels and provide a combination of endowment and annual support. Because a faculty position designated as “Centennial” enables the appointment to be made sooner, SMU has initiated a search to fill the Adams Professorship in the 2013-14 academic year.

> Read the full story from SMU News

September 13, 2012|News|
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