SMU, Dedman School of Law announce Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center

Brad Cheves

SMU, Dedman School of Law announce Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center

Umphrey Lee Cenotaph, Dedman School of Law quad, SMUSMU’s Dedman School of Law is poised to become a hub of research and education on issues related to criminal justice reform.

The Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center will be a place for scholars to undertake independent research and develop educational opportunities on topics such as the causes of wrongful convictions and over-incarceration, and ensuring the fair and ethical treatment of individuals at all stages of the criminal justice process.

The new center is supported by combined gifts totaling $7 million from the Deason Foundation and the Charles Koch Foundation. The gifts will provide $3.5 million each over a period of five years.

“The support from the Deason Foundation and the Charles Koch Foundation for this center goes right to the heart of what a great university like SMU is positioned to do in finding solutions to societal problems,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The United States has 5 percent of the world’s population, but 25 percent of the world’s prison population, so there’s work to be done. Dedman Law is eager to engage in the important national debate surrounding issues of fairness, accuracy and compassion in the criminal justice system.”

> The Dallas Morning NewsDeason and Koch give $7 million to SMU Dedman Law for criminal justice reform

Jennifer Collins, the Judge James Noel Dean and Professor of Law at Dedman School of Law, served as assistant U.S. Attorney in the District of Columbia from 1994 to 2002 and is well positioned to anticipate the impact of the Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center.

“Policy makers across the ideological spectrum are talking about the need for criminal justice reform,” Collins said. “From the adequacy of defense counsel, to police uses of force, to wrongful convictions and the racial disparities in the criminal justice system – these are the huge issues of our time. This new center will work well with our existing criminal clinic and innocence clinic, and build on our existing faculty strength in criminal law.”

The Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center will provide a platform for important interdisciplinary collaboration among many different groups, including scholars, students, the judiciary, law enforcement, prosecutors, and defense counsel. By bringing together experts from across the country to participate in symposia and conferences, the center will engage in national conversations surrounding criminal justice.

“Our passion for criminal justice reform is based on our desire to create and support programs that help lift the poor from poverty, to help them become self-dependent and, consequently, support their families and live their lives with dignity,” said Doug Deason. “Because the problems with our criminal justice system are so complex and deeply rooted, a collaborative, thoughtful approach is essential. This new Criminal Justice Reform Center will offer the research required to find innovative solutions, and we are very proud to support it.”

“Finding solutions to the problems with our criminal justice system will require the sort of leading-edge scholarship that the faculty at SMU produce. This is an issue that separates families, divides communities, and gets to the heart of how our society treats people in their most difficult hour. The Deason Center scholars can make a major difference and we’re proud to partner with the Deason family and SMU on this initiative,” said Charles Koch Foundation President Brian Hooks.

The gifts to fund the Deason Family Criminal Justice Center in Dedman School of Law count toward SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which concluded on Dec. 31, 2015 and raised more than $1 billion to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

“The overarching goal of our Second Century Campaign has been to build an extraordinary platform for research and learning at SMU,” said Brad Cheves, vice president for Development and External Affairs. “The Deason Family Criminal Justice Reform Center will support important learning experiences for our students, and, we believe, equally important societal changes. We are grateful for the opportunity this provides us.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

April 27, 2016|News|

Parade, service projects highlight SMU Dream Week 2016

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at SMU in 1966.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at SMU in 1966.

Fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke on the campus of SMU, the visionary civil rights leader’s visit will be celebrated by the University community as part of the Jan. 15-21 Dream Week activities surrounding Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“This is an opportunity for us as an SMU community to join the rest of the country in celebrating and commemorating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” says Director of Multicultural Student Affairs Creston Lynch. “Whether it’s participating in the MLK Day of Service, parade, or any of the week’s programs, there are plenty of chances to reflect in different ways on the issues relating to social justice and equity that Dr. King stood for.”

Headlining the list of SMU Dream Week activities is an appearance by Black Lives Matter founder Alicia Garza, who will speak about the origins of the social justice movement at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Hughes-Trigg Commons.

DREAM WEEK SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, JAN. 15
SMU presents Dallas Civil Rights Museum with memorabilia from 1966 MLK campus appearance

A contingent of SMU representatives, including Student Body President Carlton Adams, Association of Black Students President D’Marquis Allen and former Student Senate Chair Charles Cox, who introduced King before his speech at SMU, will present a transcript of the speech and a photo from the event to the Dallas Civil Rights Museum at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center.

More about the presentation

SATURDAY, JAN. 16
SMU Participates in Dallas’ 34th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will participate in the MLK Community Center’s annual fundraiser by telling the story of how King was invited and came to speak at SMU’s McFarlin Auditorium on March 17, 1966.

Ticket Information: See “Celebration” at the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center Dallas

MONDAY, JAN. 18
SMU Participates in the Dallas Martin Luther King, Jr., Day Parade

Starting Point: 10 a.m. at the intersection of Holmes St. and Martin Luther King, Jr., Blvd.
About: SMU administrators, faculty and students will participate in the annual Dallas parade and celebration. Led by the Mustang Band, participants will include former SMU Student Senate Chair Charles Cox, who introduced King when he spoke at the University 50 years ago, and SMU President R. Gerald Turner. Alumni of SMU’s annual spring break Civil Rights Pilgrimage, members of the SMU Student Senate, incoming SMU Vice President for Student Affairs Pamela Anthony, SMU Vice President for Development and External Affairs Brad Cheves and SMU student athletes and coaches also will join the parade.

Dallas MLK Parade Route

More about SMU at the Dallas Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade

MLK Day of Service

About: SMU students, faculty and staff will join others across the country in a national day of service. Opportunities include building fun and educational environments for children at SPARK!, organizing and restocking a Brother Bill’s Helping Hand grocery store that provides free food to more than 300 families per week, building ramps at homes of those with physical disabilities and helping prepare items for the Dallas region’s homeless. Brunch and transportation provided. Co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs and Community Engagement and Leadership.

Read more about SMU’s MLK Day of Service

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20
Commemorative Unity Walk on SMU campus 

Starting Point: Noon at Hughes-Trigg Commons, 3140 Dyer St., Dallas, 75205
About: SMU President R. Gerald Turner and student leaders will lead the annual Unity Walk, a demonstration of the University’s support of Martin Luther King Jr.’s work. All members of the SMU community are invited to join the walk, which will begin at Hughes-Trigg Student Center, continue around Bishop Boulevard and return to Hughes-Trigg. The time together is a demonstration of commitment as a university to the work of Dr. King.

An Evening with Alicia Garza

About: Alicia Garza is co-founder of the “Black Lives Matter” movement. At 5:30 p.m. at Hughes-Trigg, she will talk about the process of creating and spreading the hash tag that branded the movement, the controversy behind it, and her personal experiences in the social justice movement.

THURSDAY, JAN. 21
Film Screening: Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

About: “Brother Outsider” examines the life of Bayard Rustin, King’s right-hand man and chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Rustin had a significant influence on the civil rights movement, but rarely served as a public spokesman due to his homosexuality and involvement in an interracial relationship. Sponsored by SMU’s Women and LGBT Center at 1:30 p.m. at Hughes-Trigg.

January 15, 2016|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU prepares for Bush Presidential Center opening

Bush Center welcome graphicSMU is preparing to celebrate the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Center and welcome the worldwide visitors who will attend dedication events on campus April 24-26, 2013. The Bush Center, located on a 23-acre site on the east side of campus, houses the Presidential Library and Museum and the George W. Bush Institute. The Library and Museum will open to the public Wednesday, May 1.

Due to space limitations, attendance at the dedication ceremony planned by the Bush Center Thursday, April 25 is by invitation only. The invited guests expected to attend include President Barack Obama and former presidents George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, along with other government officials from the administration of George W. Bush.

The ceremony will be streamed at BushCenter.org. Residents of University Park and Highland Park also can view the ceremonies on SMU-TV, Channel 19.

> Visit the George W. Bush Presidential Center website

Although dedication events will bring a large number of special visitors to campus, SMU will remain open so that teaching will continue uninterrupted. To accommodate class attendance, alternative transportation and parking plans are available at smu.edu/wheretopark. Faculty, staff and students with parking questions may e-mail parking@smu.edu or call 214-768-7275.

“While classes will continue as normal, the entire SMU family should expect that our routines will be altered temporarily,” said Brad Cheves, vice president for development and external affairs. “We are honored to be serving in a hospitality role for this once-in-a-lifetime event and to welcoming visitors to campus who ordinarily would not become familiar with SMU. We are looking forward to showing what makes our University special and a fitting location for the historical resources of the Bush Presidential Center.”

Events for students, faculty and staff include:

April 25: Watch a simulcast of the Dedication Ceremony
The SMU community will have the opportunity to watch a simulcast of the formal dedication ceremony at McFarlin Auditorium (SMU ID required). Doors open at 9 a.m. Faculty, staff and students should register here. An outdoor Jumbotron north of University Boulevard, near the Dedman Life Sciences Building and the Late Fountain, also will show the proceedings. Faculty, staff and students also may watch the dedication at 9 a.m. CDT online at bushcenter.org or on Park Cities Cable Channel 19.

April 25: SMU Boulevard Block Party
During the evening of April 25, students, faculty and staff have been invited to attend the SMU Boulevard Block Party and Lighting of Freedom Hall. If you registered for the block party, you must pick up your tickets in advance at the Hughes-Trigg Mane Desk at any of the times noted below. The first 500 students to pick up their tickets will receive commemorative Croakies; the first 1,000 people to pick up their tickets will receive a commemorative T-shirt.

  • Monday, April 22: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 23: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 24: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thursday, April 25: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

April 29: SMU Day at the Bush Presidential Center
April 29 is a special preview day at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum for SMU faculty, staff and students. All available spaces have been taken. Visit smu.edu/smuday for more information.

Please note that SMU IDs are needed for SMU students, faculty and staff to enter events during the week of the Bush Center dedication.

Please send parking questions to parking@smu.edu and other questions to bushdedication@smu.edu.

> Find more information on the George W. Bush Presidential Center opening

April 23, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|

University completes property swap with Chi Omega

SMU Chi Omega House at 3014 Daniel Avenue

The Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of SMU’s Division of Student Affairs in a swap for University property at 3034 Daniel. The sorority will build its new house at the northeast corner of Daniel and Durham Street. Photo from the SMU Chi Omega website.

SMU has made a property trade with one of its sorority chapters to take effect Monday, April 1, 2013. The Iota Alpha chapter of Chi Omega at SMU will build its new house at 3034 Daniel Avenue, while the current Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of the Division of Student Affairs.

Chi Omega will begin construction on a new house this year, and its membership wanted to locate the facility closer to the hub of SMU’s sorority activity. In 2012, sorority members began discussions about the exchange with SMU vice presidents Brad Cheves, Development and External Affairs; Chris Regis, Business and Finance, and Lori White, Student Affairs. Cheves helped negotiate the swap.

Later this spring, the sorority will begin abatement and demolition of the SMU Faculty Club building currently located at 3034 Daniel, on the northeast corner of Daniel Avenue and Durham Street. The new Chi Omega house is scheduled to open at its new address in Fall 2014.

The University plans to relocate the Faculty Club to a new visitors’ center, currently in the planning stages. Plans for the facility at 3014 Daniel will be announced at a later date.

The move may have a minimal short-term impact on Faculty Club events such as the Distinguished Luncheons, which are frequently held in larger venues due to high levels of interest. In addition, Faculty Club members will continue to gather in the Faculty/Staff Dining Room in RFoC @ Lee.

In recent years, the Faculty Club has provided office space for Alumni Relations and Engagement and the Faculty Senate. Both offices have moved to the University’s East Campus on North Central Expressway – Alumni Relations to the 6200 Building and the Faculty Senate to the 12th floor of Expressway Tower at 6116 North Central.

The month of March has been devoted to removing and storing all Faculty Club property from the 3034 Daniel house, as well as reusable fixtures ranging from faucets to door handles, says Alison Tweedy, senior director of campus services. “Facility Services will take out anything that can be reused or repurposed,” she says.

The SMU Faculty Club, which is open to both faculty and staff members, was founded in 1921 as a social club for male faculty members. A women’s club was founded in 1928, and the two merged in 1963. Both clubs held their meetings in Atkins Hall (now Clements Hall) until the male club moved to the second floor of McFarlin Auditorium in the 1940s.

As Faculty Senate president in 1972-73, Ruth P. Morgan, who would later become University provost, made it a priority to establish a new home for the Faculty Club. Provost H. Neil McFarland provided the property at 3034 Daniel Avenue, then a sorority house, in 1973. The club was officially chartered in that location on August 6, 1973.

March 28, 2013|News|

New gift establishes first Endowed Centennial Chair at SMU

Ross Perot Jr. and Sarah Fullinwider Perot with Jerome FullinwiderA new gift from Sarah and Ross Perot Jr. of Dallas will establish the Jerome M. Fullinwider Endowed Centennial Chair in Economic Freedom, named in honor of Mrs. Perot’s father. The chair-holder will join the faculty in the William J. O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom in SMU’s Cox School of Business.

The gift makes history for the University as its first endowed centennial chair, part of a new category of gifts to commemorate the 100th anniversary of SMU’s founding and opening. A position designated as “centennial” must meet elevated giving levels, be a combination of endowment funding and five years of annual support, and be created during the centennial celebration period – Jan. 1, 2011, through Dec. 31, 2015.

“This gift supports one of the top priorities of SMU’s Second Century Campaign and the University’s strategic plan – increasing the number of faculty positions that are endowed,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “When this campaign began, SMU had 62 endowed faculty positions. Our goal is to increase that number to 100. With other endowed chairs and professorships established during the campaign, this new commitment brings us to 83. We are deeply grateful for the generosity and foresight of the Perot and Fullinwider families for leading the way in establishing this centennial chair.”

The gift for the Fullinwider chair counts toward SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which at midpoint has raised more than $500 million to advance student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Jerome “Jerry” M. Fullinwider received a B.B.A. degree from SMU in 1951 and is a 1953 graduate of the U.S. Naval School of Justice in Newport, Rhode Island. Following graduation, he served with the U.S. Navy in Korea and China.

“My father has pursued his interest in free enterprise and expansion of global business relationships throughout his business career,” Sarah Perot said. “When he told us of his commitment to the O’Neil Center, Ross and I decided that an endowed faculty chair in his name would be a fitting way for us to recognize his achievements and to ensure the permanence of his interest long into the future.” The Perots added to his commitment to provide a total gift of $2 million for the centennial chair.

Above, Ross Perot Jr. and Sarah Fullinwider Perot with Jerome M. Fullinwider (right).

> Read more from SMU News
> Visit the O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom online

May 11, 2011|News|
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