Board of Trustees

Updates from the May 5, 2017 meeting of the SMU Board of Trustees

In its quarterly meeting May 5, SMU’s Board of Trustees elected new officers, selected two new committee chairs and welcomed new incoming deans of the Edwin L. Cox School of Business and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. President R. Gerald Turner also agreed to a five-year extension, ensuring that he will continue to serve as president until at least May 31, 2022.

According to SMU Board of Trustees Chair Michael M. Boone, this action expresses the Board’s continuing confidence in Turner’s leadership. “The Board’s goal is to continue SMU’s momentum and its rising prominence at this historic time.”

The SMU Board reelected Boone as board chair. Robert H. Dedman, Jr. was elected vice-chair and chair-elect. He is expected to serve as board chair beginning in June 2018. David B. Miller was elected secretary. Two new committee chairs were chosen by the Board: Kelly Compton will chair the Academic Affairs Committee and Jeanne Tower Cox will chair the Student Affairs Committee.

New ex-officio members of the Board are SMU Faculty Senate President Paul Krueger, a professor of mechanical engineering in the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering, SMU Alumni Board Chair Doug Smellage, 1977 SMU alumnus and Dallas businessman, and SMU Student Trustee Andrew Udofa, a 2014 SMU alumnus (degrees in biology and chemistry) and current Simmons School of Education and Human Development doctoral student.

SMU’s new deans, who will start at the University on Aug. 1, are Matthew B. Myers, Cox School of Business, and Stephanie L. Knight, Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The Board also enthusiastically supported the Pony Power: Strengthening the Stampede initiative to strengthen annual support for scholarships and programs. The goal of this three-year effort is to increase current-use giving from its $43 million per year total to $50 million per year.

Boone re-elected SMU Board of Trustees chair effective June 2015

Mike BooneCivic leader Michael M. Boone, co-founder of the law firm of Haynes and Boone, has been re-elected chair of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University’s 42-member governing board, effective June 2015.

“Mike Boone’s leadership has been crucial as SMU marks the final year of its centennial celebration and capital campaign,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His able guidance has set a strong course as we prepare for our second century of achievement.”

Boone has been an SMU trustee since 1996. Throughout his service on the Board, he has been a member of virtually every Board committee, among them Finance, Audit and Trusteeship. A former adjunct professor of corporate securities law at the Dedman School of Law, he currently serves as vice chair of the Dedman Law School’s Executive Board. In leading the Board of Trustees, Boone serves as a co-chair of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which seeks $1 billion for scholarships, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

In addition, Robert Dedman Jr. was re-elected vice chair of the Board of Trustees and David Miller was re-elected secretary.

Robert Dedman is the general partner of Putterboy, Ltd. and president of the Dedman family enterprise, DFI Management, Ltd. He was elected to the SMU Board of Trustees in 2004 and has served as secretary of the Board since 2010. He also serves on the Executive Boards of Dedman College and Dedman School of Law and on The Second Century Campaign Leadership Council. He previously served SMU on the board of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies in Dedman College, the 21st Century Council and the Texas Campaign Committee for The Campaign for SMU.

David Miller is co-founder of EnCap Investments L.P., a leading private equity firm based in Houston and Dallas, where he serves as a partner. He also serves as president of the David B. Miller Family Foundation. Miller has served as a member of the SMU Board of Trustees since 2008 and is a member of the Second Century Campaign Leadership Council. He is chair of the Executive Board for the Edwin L. Cox School of Business, co-chair of The Second Century Campaign Steering Committee for Cox School of Business and serves on the Campaign Steering Committee for Athletics.

$5 million gift from Harlan and Kathy Crow to support SMU Residential Commons

Harlan and Katherine Raymond Crow of Dallas have committed $5 million toward the construction of the Kathy Crow Commons in SMU’s new Residential Commons complex, scheduled to open in fall 2014. Mrs. Crow is a member of the SMU Board of Trustees and an alumna.

“This gift from Harlan and Kathy Crow will support a campus home and gathering place for generations of students,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Students who live in Kathy Crow Commons will be part of an academic and residential community that will become a key part of their SMU experience. We are grateful for the Crows for this generous gift.”

SMU’s new Residential Commons model of campus living, which includes 11 Commons created from new and existing residential buildings, will provide an integrated academic and residential student experience. Live-in faculty members will have offices and teach classes in on-site classrooms. In addition, each Commons will develop traditions and host gatherings and activities to create a sense of community among the residents.

“We have studied numerous institutions with strong residential communities,” said Lori White, vice president for student affairs. “We know the Residential Commons model will strengthen the SMU experience by enhancing student involvement opportunities and creating common bonds and friendships among diverse groups of students.”

Since 1988, Harlan Crow has served as chairman and CEO of Crow Family Holdings, which manages the capital of the Trammell Crow family. The Trammell Crow Company, founded in Dallas in 1948 by Crow’s father, is one of the nation’s oldest and largest commercial real estate developers and investors. Mr. Crow has worked with Crow-affiliated entities for nearly 40 years. He serves on the board of directors of the American Enterprise Institute, the Southwestern Medical Foundation, the Supreme Court Historical Society, the George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation and the Antiquarian Society. In addition Mr. Crow is the honorary consul of Denmark for the Southwestern region.

Dallas civic leader Kathy Crow earned her M.B.A. from Cox School of Business. In addition to her current position on the SMU Board of Trustees, she has served on the boards of SMU’s Tate Lecture Series and the Women’s Economics and Financial Series at Cox School of Business.

The $5 million gift for the Kathy Crow Commons counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised $844 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience. The campaign coincides with SMU’s celebration of the 100th anniversary of the University’s founding in 1911 and its opening in 1915.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

$1 million gift endows Meadows Museum directorship

William and Linda Custard of Dallas

William and Linda Custard of Dallas

A $1 million gift from Linda and William Custard of Dallas will establish and endow the position of Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts at SMU. An additional $1 million from The Meadows Foundation will add to the endowment of the position.

Mark Roglán, who has served as director of the Meadows Museum since 2006, will be the first holder of the position of the Custard Director of the Museum and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts. As the chair of the Meadows Museum Advisory Board since 2009, Linda Custard has worked closely with Roglán in development and expansion of Museum programs.

The Centennial designation is a special gift category during SMU’s 100th anniversary commemoration, 2011-15. Centennial endowments include operational funding to support the immediate needs of a scholarship or academic position while the principal of the endowment matures.

“We are deeply grateful to Linda and Bill Custard for their generosity in establishing this endowed position for the Meadows Museum and Meadows School,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Linda Custard has provided dedicated leadership on the SMU Board of Trustees and the Leadership Council of the Second Century Campaign. This endowed Centennial chair supports one of the campaign’s highest priorities. It brings the total of SMU’s endowed academic positions to 93 toward a goal of 100.”

“Mark Roglán has enhanced the Meadows Museum’s international stature with important new programs, such as a partnership with the Prado Museum in Madrid,” said Linda Custard. “I have been privileged to assist him in implementing some of his exciting plans for the Museum. Bill and I are pleased that we can endow the Museum directorship and delighted that Mark will be the first person to hold the position.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

Mitch Hart named SMU Trustee Emeritus

Milledge A. 'Mitch' Hart, IIIThe SMU Board of Trustees has named former trustee Milledge A. “Mitch” Hart, III as Trustee Emeritus. The Board passed a resolution to honor Hart with this designation during its quarterly meeting Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013.

For extraordinary service and leadership, former members of the SMU Board may be named emeriti members. To date, in its 100-year history, only nine individuals have been named Trustee Emeriti. Hart served on the SMU Board from 1996 to 2008.

“Mitch Hart provided and continues to provide the vision and resources to initiate new programs of significance at SMU,” said Caren Prothro, chair of the SMU Board of Trustees. “This singular honor is a fitting recognition of his remarkable service to the SMU Board and the guidance he will continue to provide as trustee emeritus.”

During his SMU Board terms, Hart served on several committees: Academic Policy, Planning & Management; Audit; Buildings and Grounds; Development and External Affairs; Executive/Personnel/Compensation; and Investment. He also served as a member of the Dedman College Executive Board.

Hart currently serves on the Leadership Council of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, which is raising funds supporting student quality, academic and faculty excellence and the campus experience. He also is a member of the SMU Board of Trustees’ Development and External Affairs Committee and is a member and former chair of the Board’s Investment Committee. In addition, he serves on the Lyle School of Engineering Campaign Steering Committee and the school’s Executive Board. He is a member of the Hart Global Leaders Forum Advisory Board and is a member and former chair of the Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series Board.

Hart’s election as an SMU trustee emeritus makes him the 9th individual so honored since the University created the designation in 1990 and one of 4 currently serving, including Edwin L. Cox, William L. Hutchison, and Cary M. Maguire. Past trustees emeriti included the late Gov. William P. Clements Jr., J. Lindsay Embrey Jr., William R. Hawn, Roy M. Huffington, and Elizabeth Perkins Prothro.

> Read the full story from SMU News

SMU trustees approve new Human Rights major to begin Spring 2012

SMU Embrey Human Rights Program logoSMU has become the first university in the South, and only the fifth in the country, to offer an academic major in human rights. Approved Sept. 9 by the University’s Board of Trustees, the Bachelor of Arts in human rights degree comes five years after creation of the Embrey Human Rights Program at SMU.

The undergraduate degree program officially begins in Spring 2012, but most SMU students will be allowed to apply past or current courses toward the degree, says Embrey Human Rights Program Director Rick Halperin. The human rights major will offer two interdisciplinary tracks: one on gender and human rights, the other on public policy and human rights.

“I have always believed that if you appealed to the better nature in people, and then offered them opportunities to put their passion into practice, that this degree would be a natural,” Halperin says. “It is beyond my comprehension that programs like this do not exist throughout this country, but at least it now exists here.”

The only other U.S. universities to offer human rights majors are Bard College and Columbia University/Barnard College in New York, the University of Dayton in Ohio and Trinity College in Connecticut.

The new major is the result of Dallas philanthropist Lauren Embrey‘s travel with Halperin’s study group to Polish Holocaust sites in December 2005. Embrey, then enrolled in SMU’s Master of Liberal Arts program, returned from the trip determined to share her life-changing experience. In the six years since the trip, sisters Lauren and Gayle Embrey and the Embrey Family Foundation have committed substantial financial support for the Embrey Human Rights Program, which began in 2006, and the minor, which followed in 2007.

“The human rights major at SMU creates the ability to educate and broaden awareness, to challenge prevailing world views and to promote a rights-based society that minimizes injustice,” Lauren Embrey says. “We are also proud that the program can be seen as a model for other human rights education programs, and that it offers varied programming open to the community beyond SMU.”

The Embrey Foundation’s vision “will allow the major to be a signature program for SMU and for Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences,” says Dean William Tsutsui. “It not only will prepare students to understand human rights issues around the world, but also will equip them with the skills necessary to make a real difference and effect meaningful change,” he says. “The graduates of this important and timely new major will be the leaders of the next generation of global human rights advocates.”

So far 200 students have either formally declared the minor or are taking courses toward declaring the minor in the fastest growing program at SMU. Halperin, a nationally known human rights activist and former two-time chair of Amnesty International, says many students already have expressed interest in pursuing the new major, which will consist of 30 hours of traditional coursework, a minor in a related field and 12 hours of a foreign language.

> Read the full story from SMU News
> Visit the Embrey Human Rights Program homepage

Caren H. Prothro to lead SMU Board of Trustees

Caren ProthroCivic and philanthropic leader Caren H. Prothro, a leader in the arts and higher education, will become chair of the SMU Board of Trustees beginning with its Sept. 10, 2010 meeting. She was unanimously elected to the two-year term by her fellow trustees in May.

“I am honored for the opportunity to serve as chair during one of the most dynamic and forward-looking times in SMU’s development,” Prothro said. “Thanks to the strength of our students, faculty, staff and administration, SMU is a rising national university with local and global impact. I look forward to working with our outstanding Board of Trustees in helping SMU continue to improve student quality, faculty and academic excellence, and the campus experience.”

Prothro has been a member of the SMU Board of Trustees since 1992 and served as vice chair from 1998-2000. She currently is a co-chair of SMU’s Second Century Campaign and its Leadership Council. She serves on several trustee committees, including the Academic Policy, Planning and Management Committee and the Buildings and Grounds Committee. As trustee chair, she also serves on the executive boards of each of SMU’s schools and its libraries. In addition, she serves on the boards of SMU-in-Taos and the University’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

“Caren Prothro will lead our Board during a unique period in our history, as we prepare to commemorate the Centennial of SMU’s founding in 2011 and of its opening in 2015,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “During this period, we will be continuing our successful Second Century Campaign, for which Mrs. Prothro serves as a co-chair. And our Centennial will help us focus attention on the incredible progress of the University in fulfilling the vision of its founders. Most importantly, she will provide leadership and guidance going forward.”

> Read more from SMU News

By | 2010-09-08T16:01:10+00:00 September 8, 2010|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |

Trustees honor outgoing chair Carl Sewell

prothro-sewell-turner-10june2010.ashx.jpgDallas business leader Carl Sewell was honored at the May meeting of the SMU Board of Trustees with a resolution recognizing his leadership of University advancements during his four-year term as board chair.

Sewell joined the SMU Board of Trustees in 1996. He served on numerous standing committees of the board and as vice chair from 2004-06, chair-elect from 2005-06 and board chair from 2006-10, concluding his term at the May meeting. He remains a board member, co-chairing the Trusteeship Committee and serving on committees for Academic Policies and Planning, Athletics, and Executive/Personnel/ Compensation.

A 1966 graduate of SMU, Sewell is chair of Sewell Automotive Companies and a national leader in the automotive industry.

As chair of the Board of Trustees, “Mr. Sewell has led by sharing his experience, skills and thoughtful insight into Board policy-making, but also through his generous financial support which has materially aided the University in achieving a leadership role in higher education in the Southwest and becoming a nationally recognized university,” the resolution states.

In photo: Carl Sewell (center), with SMU Board Chair Caren Prothro and SMU President R. Gerald Turner, accepts a resolution honoring him for his four years of service to the University as board chair.

> Read more from SMU News.

By | 2010-06-21T15:08:24+00:00 June 21, 2010|Categories: News|Tags: , , |

Deadline for Student Trustee applications is April 15

SMU’s Board of Trustees is seeking student applicants to serve in a variety of positions. Interested students can apply online; the 2009 deadline is at noon April 16.

One student each year serves as the Student Member of the Board of Trustees, a full voting member of the Board. Eight students also serve as Student Members of the Board Standing Committees. In addition, the Student Trustee chairs a committee of the Student Representatives and the Student Body President. This committee enhances the effectiveness of the Representatives within their committees and facilitates communication between the Board of Trustees and the university community.

“Serving as the Student Member of the SMU Board of Trustees has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” says current Student Trustee Lamar Dowling, a senior music major in Meadows School of the Arts. “Very few universities in the nation allow a student to sit on their board, and even fewer have a student as a full voting member. SMU provides this special opportunity, which demonstrates the board’s commitment to making this a better university for students.”

“I have had the opportunity to serve along with titans of the business, philanthropic and political world and learn from their amazing experiences,” he adds. “I even attended dinner at the White House with former President and Mrs. George W. Bush. This position has provided me with wonderful learning experiences and countless opportunities, all of which I am happy to be passing along to another student this May.”

By | 2009-04-06T10:35:28+00:00 April 6, 2009|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |
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