Women’s health care in Texas is subject of SMU public forum Jan. 31

Beth Newman

Women’s health care in Texas is subject of SMU public forum Jan. 31

Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis

State Sen. Wendy Davis will participate in a public forum on women’s health care in Texas at SMU Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013.

The SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program will sponsor a public forum Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013 on the effects of proposed Texas anti-abortion legislation that has been criticized by women’s rights advocates as crippling state-funded health care options for all women.

Scheduled for 7 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, the forum comes 40 years to the week after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled abortion legal in the landmark Texas case Roe v. Wade.

The event will feature a discussion with Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis (pictured right, D-Fort Worth), Dallas physician (OB-GYN) Deborah Fuller and Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas President and CEO Ken Lambrecht. It will be moderated by Dave Mann, editor of The Texas Observer, which has been highlighting the issue in a series of articles and events.

Admission will be free to the public, but reservations are required; RSVP to Jenny Leigh Walthall at The Texas Observer.

“This forum will address the forgotten needs of under- and uninsured women, the key role of funding in the women’s health debate, and the uncertain future of choice in Texas,” says Beth Newman, director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program in SMU’s Dedman College. The program is sponsoring the event with The Texas Observer.

“Recent actions by the Texas Legislature are putting the health of women and their families at risk,” Newman says. “The defunding of Planned Parenthood is not only an assault on women’s reproductive freedom, but also on the total health of many of our citizens, especially low-income women.”

“Collateral Damage” continues the Women’s and Gender Studies Program’s focus on women’s health care issues after its panel discussion with Sandra Fluke last fall.

Written by Denise Gee

Learn more about the SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program
Visit The Texas Observer online

January 30, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Tune In: Beth Newman talks Dickens with ‘Think’ Dec. 6, 2012

Beth Newman, associate professor of English in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, will discuss what we can learn about Victorian life and history from “A Christmas Carol” on KERA’s “Think” from 1-2 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6.

Newman will share the hour with Joel Ferrell, associate artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center, who is directing the DTC’s 2012 staging of the Charles Dickens classic. Also appearing is Chamblee Ferguson, who plays Ebenezer Scrooge in the production. “A Christmas Carol” runs at the Kalita Humphreys Theater in Dallas through Sunday, Dec. 23. Tickets are available online.

> Listen live at kera.org/think

December 6, 2012|Faculty in the News, Tune In|

SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

A panel of SMU faculty members from a wide range of disciplines will examine the history of and emerging ramifications for the concept of privacy in the 21st century at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West Ballroom.

The program launches the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s IMPACT (Interdisciplinary Meetings to Address Pressing Current Themes) series of symposia. Sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, the symposium is free and open to the public and includes a 3 p.m. reception.

Lee Cullum, journalist and fellow in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will moderate the discussion. Panelists include SMU professors whose studies touch on some aspect of privacy:

  • George Holden is professor of psychology in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Holden specializes in developmental psychology with a focus on family violence and parent-child interactions. His current research involves analyzing home audio recordings of mothers and their preschoolers. “Psychologists are in the business of exploring people’s private lives — such as their secret thoughts and behavior behind closed doors,” Holden says. “Consequently, we are confronted with various thorny issues.”
  • Alexis McCrossen is associate professor of history in Dedman College whose specialty is U.S. social and cultural history. “Privacy is an institution that came of age in early modern Europe,” she says.
  • Beth Newman is associate professor of English and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program in Dedman College. Newman, whose specialty is 19th-century British literature, says “The concept of privacy developed alongside the rise of the novel, which reinforced its importance — especially for the middle class.”
  • Santanu Roy is professor of economics in Dedman College. Roy’s research interests are in industrial organization, natural resources and environment, international and economic growth.
  • Mary Spector is associate professor of law and director of the Consumer Law Project – both in Dedman School of Law. Spector’s research interests are in the areas of consumer credit, landlord-tenant law and clinical legal education.
  • Suku Nair is chair and professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering. Nair’s research interests are in network and systems security and reliability.

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute was made possible by a $5 million gift from the Dedman Family and the Dedman Foundation. The Institute was created to bring together faculty and students from the humanities, sciences and social sciences for collaborative research and other programs. The Institute will host annual seminars bringing together faculty, graduate and undergraduate students and members of the community to discuss global issues.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story at SMU News

October 30, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Women’s health advocate Sandra Fluke to speak at SMU Sept. 24

Women's health advocate Sandra FlukeWomen’s health advocate Sandra Fluke — the Georgetown University law student Rush Limbaugh verbally attacked earlier this year for supporting contraception coverage in the Affordable Care Act — will be at SMU Monday, Sept. 24, 2012 to discuss “Economics and Equality: How Obstacles to Women’s Health Care Access Affect Us All.”

Fluke’s appearance is set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater and is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by SMU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program with support from Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Embrey Human Rights Program and the Office of the Provost.

On the heels of her speech at the Democratic National Convention Sept. 5, and her March testimony before a Democratic steering committee, “Sandra Fluke is emerging as one of our most outspoken advocates for reproductive rights and women’s health issues,” says Beth Newman, director of SMU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program and associate professor of English.

“Our goal is not to stage a debate between adversaries who hurl worn-out sound bites at one another. We want to offer students and the community an informed discussion about the relationship between reproductive rights and women’s health and how the conversation plays out in the media.”

Joining Fluke for the panel discussion will be:

  • Charles E. Curran, SMU’s Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, “who can provide insight, as a moral theologian and loyal dissenter within the Catholic Church, into some of the issues Fluke raised in her testimony last March,” Newman says.
  • SMU Associate Provost and Dedman School of Law Professor Linda Eads, who can add legal expertise to the discussion.
  • Ken Lambrecht, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of North Texas, “who can speak about how the Texas legislature’s recent defunding of all Planned Parenthood clinics is affecting women’s health,” Newman says.
  • Event moderator Karen Thomas, professor of practice in Meadows School of the Arts. The award-winning journalist has 25 years’ experience covering the news as well as health and family issues.

For more information, contact the SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read more from SMU News

September 20, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

For the Record: Dec. 2, 2010

Anita Ingram, Risk Management, was inducted as 2010-11 treasurer of the University Risk Management and Insurance Association (URMIA) at the organization’s 41st annual conference in Pittsburgh on Oct. 12, 2010. URMIA is an international nonprofit educational association promoting “the advancement and application of effective risk management principles and practices in institutions of higher education,” according to its press release. It represents more than 500 institutions of higher education and 100 companies.

Beth Newman, English, Dedman College, attended the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Montreal Nov. 11-13, 2010, where she read a paper titled “Walter Pater, Alice Meynell, and Aestheticist Temporality.” The next weekend she read a slightly expanded version of the paper at the Clark Library (UCLA), at a symposium titled “Cultures of Aestheticism.”

Emily George Grubbs ’08, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, wrote an article published in Legacies: A History Journal for Dallas and North Central Texas, published by the Dallas Historical Society. The article, “Texas Regionalism and the Little Theatre of Dallas,” discusses the collaboration between local artists and the Little Theatre of Dallas in areas such as program cover design, stage sets and publicity posters. Early in their careers, architect O’Neil Ford and artists Jerry Bywaters, Alexandre Hogue and Perry Nichols were among those who collaborated with the theatre.

Grant Kao and Justin Nesbit, graduate video game design students in The Guildhall at SMU, have been chosen to receive national scholarships presented annually by the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. Kao and Nesbit will receive $2,500 each through the Randy Pausch and Mark Beaumont scholarship funds, respectively. The scholarships are awarded by the AIAS Foundation, the philanthropic arm of AIAS. Read more from SMU News.

SMU’s Data Mining TeamSubhojit Das and Greg Johnson, third-year students in the economics graduate program; and Jacob Williamson, a second-year graduate student in applied economics – has placed second in the national 2010 SAS Data Mining Shootout competition. Their faculty sponsor is Tom Fomby, Economics, Dedman College. Winners of the national competition were announced Oct. 25 at the SAS Data Mining Conference in Las Vegas.

SMU 2010 Data Mining Team in Las VegasThe competition’s problem statement was to determine the economic benefit of reducing the Body Mass Indices (BMIs) of a select number of individuals by 10 percent and to determine the cost savings to federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, as well as to the economy as a whole, from the implementation of the proposed BMI reduction program. This is the third year in a row that the University’s Economics Department has fielded one of the country’s top three data mining teams; SMU finished as national champions in 2008 and 2009. Read more from SMU News.

(In photo, left to right: Tim Rey of Dow Chemical Company; Subhojit Das, Tom Fomby, Greg Johnson and Jacob Williamson, all of SMU; and Tracy Hewitt of the Institute for Health and Business Insight at Central Michigan University. Dow Chemical and the Institute for Health and Business Insight were co-sponsors of the competition, along with the SAS Institute of Cary, North Carolina.)

December 2, 2010|For the Record|
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