awards and honors

SMU Meadows students are big winners at the 2017 AAF Dallas ADDY Awards

SMU ADDY Award winners 2017

SMU’s 2017 student ADDY Award winners, pictured left to right: Jackson Foley, Tiffany Giraudon, Helen Rieger, Liz Martinelli, Samantha Butz and Morgan Hoff.

Students of the Temerlin Advertising Institute (TAI) in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts won multiple honors in the Student category of the 55th annual American Advertising Federation (AAF) American Advertising Awards local competition.

The awards were presented at a ceremony hosted by AAF Dallas on Thursday, Feb. 23 at The Bomb Factory in Deep Ellum. The trophies are known as the ADDYs.

SMU students won four awards in four categories, including two of the four gold awards presented to student entries, as well as two silver awards. All silver- and gold-winning submissions are eligible to advance to the district-level competition in Fort Worth, April 6-8.

The winning entries, and their creators:

Gold Awards:

  • CLIENT: Hypnotic Donuts
  • CATEGORY: Illustration
  • CREDITS: Tiffany Giraudon and Helen Rieger
  • CLIENT: Charity Navigator
  • CATEGORY: Integrated Campaigns
  • CREDITS: Helen Rieger and Jackson Foley

Silver Awards:

  • CLIENT: Zero Gravity
  • CATEGORY: Logo Design
  • CREDITS: Samantha Butz
  • CLIENT: Bands in Town
  • CATEGORY: Magazine Advertising
  • CREDITS: Morgan Hoff and Liz Martinelli

“I am thrilled with the culture of creativity that has formed in Temerlin Advertising Institute,” said Steve Edwards, TAI director. “With the addition of Mark Allen to the faculty, along with Willie Baronet and Cheryl Mendenhall, we have a team of experts who push students to push themselves creatively. The results are students winning a greater number of awards, and more prestigious awards, each year. We are especially proud that these students are competing successfully for professional opportunities at the hottest advertising agencies in the country.

“We also applaud the efforts of AAF Dallas to identify, recognize and promote our young talent,” said Edwards. “Without their support and the hours put in by volunteer judges, none of this would have been possible. We look forward to seeing Sam, Morgan, Liz, Jackson, Helen and Tiffany bring home awards from the regional and national competitions.”

> Read the full story – and see the ADDY-winning campaigns – at SMU News

2017-03-03T15:32:18+00:00 March 3, 2017|For the Record, News|

23 outstanding SMU professors honored at 2017 HOPE Awards banquet

 

SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 23 outstanding professors at the 2017 HOPE Awards Banquet Tuesday, Feb. 7.

Mark Chancey, professor of religious studies Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, was honored as 2017 Professor of the Year.

HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

The complete list of 2017 HOPE Award honorees:

Cox School of Business

  • Jay Carson, Management and Organizations
  • Liliana Hickman-Riggs, Accounting
  • Sal Mistry, Management and Organizations
  • Mukunthan Santhanakrishnan, Finance
  • Greg Sommers, Accounting
  • Tilan Tang, Finance

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Stephanie Amsel, English
  • Mark Chancey, Religious Studies (HOPE Professor of the Year)
  • Rita Economos, Earth Sciences
  • Liljana Elverskog, World Languages and Literatures (Arabic)
  • Serge Frolov, Religious Studies
  • Luigi Manzetti, Political Science
  • Alberto Pastor, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish)
  • Elizabeth Wheaton, Economics
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Elena Borzova, Mechanical Engineering,
  • Joseph Camp, Electrical Engineering
  • Rachel Goodman, Engineering Management, Information and Systems

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Brandi Coleman, Dance
  • Lee Gleiser, Meadows Marketing and Communications
  • Will Power, Theatre
  • Jared Schroeder, Journalism

Dedman School of Law

  • Martin Camp, Graduate and International Programs

> Read more from The Daily Campus

2017-02-17T11:24:32+00:00 February 14, 2017|For the Record, News|

SMU honors four oustanding graduates at 2016 DAA Awards Thursday, Nov. 3

DAA 2016 headshots

A philanthropist, a financial services leader and a real estate and construction magnate will receive SMU’s 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards, the highest honor the university bestows upon its graduates. The DAA Award banquet and ceremony takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3  on the University’s historic Main Quad.

This year’s recipients include:

Kevin Lavelle ’08 will receive the Emerging Leader Award, which recognizes an outstanding alumnus or alumna who has graduated within the last 15 years. Lavelle is the founder of Mizzen+Main, a clothing company that introduced advanced performance fabrics to traditional menswear.

> Learn more at smu.edu/daa

2016-11-03T14:13:19+00:00 November 3, 2016|Calendar Highlights, News|

Fred Chang inducted into National Academy of Engineering in D.C. ceremony

Fred ChangFred Chang, National Academy of Engineering induction, director of SMU’s Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security and a recognized leader in academia, business and government, was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, at the organization’s National Meeting in Washington D.C.

He entered the NAE as part of a group of 80 new members and 22 foreign members who were elected in February. The citation honoring his admission lauded Chang, who is former director of research at the National Security Agency, “for leadership in cybersecurity research in the intelligence community and advancing the importance of cybersecurity science in academia.”

“I am proud to represent SMU, and honored to be a part of this prestigious assembly of people who have contributed so much to engineering and technology,” Chang said. “The mission of the National Academy of Engineering, to promote a vibrant engineering profession and provide independent advice to the federal government, has never been more important than it is today. I’m grateful to have the opportunity to support that mission.”

Chang joined SMU in September 2013 as Bobby B. Lyle Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security, computer science and engineering professor in the Lyle School of Engineering, and Senior Fellow in the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. The Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security, focused on the most pressing cyber challenges facing individuals, business and government today, was launched in the Lyle School in January 2014 with Chang as its director.

Fred Chang and Bobby B. Lyle, National Academy of Engineering inductionSMU trustee Bobby B. Lyle, for whom SMU’s engineering school is named, attended the induction ceremony with Chang.

“Dr. Chang’s election into membership of the National Academy of Engineering is a recognition that is well deserved, given the depth and breadth of his contributions to his profession and our nation,” Lyle said.  “SMU is extremely proud that Dr. Chang has chosen to advance his important work in cybersecurity at the Lyle School of Engineering.  His leadership in the field is an inspiration for our students and his faculty colleagues throughout the university.  It is an honor to join his family, his professional peers and his many friends in congratulating Dr. Chang for achieving this important milestone in his distinguished career.”

— Kim Cobb

> Read the full story from SMU News

2016-10-13T13:51:03+00:00 October 13, 2016|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News|

Andrew J. Torget’s history of cotton, slavery and the Texas Revolution wins 2015 Weber-Clements Book Prize

'Seeds of Empire' coverSMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies will present its annual Weber-Clements Book Prize to historian Andrew J. Torget for Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 (University of North Carolina Press, 2015).

Torget will be honored Tuesday, Sept. 27 at a 5:30 p.m. reception, followed by a 6 p.m. lecture and book-signing in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To register, call 214-768-3684 or visit the Clements Center website.

In addition, Torget will discuss his work on KERA 90.1’s “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour on Thursday, Sept. 22. Listen live. audio or podcast

The David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America honors both the Center’s founding director and founding benefactor. The $2,500 prize, administered by the Western History Association, is given for fine writing and original research on the American Southwest and is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

Andrew J. Torget, 2015 Weber-Clements Book Prize winner

Andrew J. Torget, SMU’s 2015 Weber-Clements Book Prize winner. Photo credit: Jun Ma/UNT

Torget, associate professor of history at the University of North Texas and the Clements Center’s inaugural David J. Weber Fellow, has won nine major book awards for Seeds of Empire, including the Weber-Clements Prize. The book explores the roles cotton and slavery played in fomenting the Texas Revolution, which was in part a reaction against abolitionists in the Mexican government, and in shaping Texas’ borderlands into the first fully-committed slaveholders’ republic in North America.

In selecting the book from a large field of entries, judges wrote: “Torget’s deep archival work brings a fresh perspective to the conflicts over slavery in Texas on the eve of the Civil War. The book’s most notable accomplishment is the emphasis on cotton and slavery as a world-wide system that bound Texas history to larger economic and political forces in the U.S., Mexico, and Europe. He challenges the traditional interpretation that the westward movement in the early nineteenth century was primarily motivated by ideologies of racial supremacy that characterized Manifest Destiny. Instead, Torget demonstrates that, although westering Americans felt superior to the people whose lands they invaded, they mainly migrated to take advantage of the opportunity to participate in the trans-Atlantic cotton economy that the Mexican government had established by offering them free land.”

Finalists for the Weber-Clements Book Prize included Emily Lutenski for West of Harlem: African American Writers and the Borderlands; and former Clements Fellow John Weber for From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century.

2016-09-21T14:50:53+00:00 September 21, 2016|Calendar Highlights, For the Record, News|
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