SMU Dean William Tsutsui named president of Hendrix College

appointments

SMU Dean William Tsutsui named president of Hendrix College

William TsutsuiAfter a nationwide search for the new president of Hendrix College, the trustees of that institution have identified Dedman College Dean Bill Tsutsui for the position. He has accepted the offer and will leave SMU May 31, 2014, to assume the presidency. His wife, Marjorie Swann, will hold a tenured faculty position at Hendrix, which is located in Conway, Arkansas.

“We deeply appreciate the leadership of Bill Tsutsui during the past three years,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “During that time he has worked collaboratively to lead significant and rapid progress in developing innovative programs, establishing new endowed chairs and advancing research. It is not surprising that Dean Tsutsui would be tapped for a college presidency as the next step in his distinguished career as an administrator and educator. We wish him the best of luck.”

Dean Tsutsui has been a strong advocate in cultivating support for Dedman College, working closely with the Dedman College Committee of The Second Century Campaign and the Dedman College Executive Board. Dedman’s relationships with these leaders will remain intact as a major asset in attracting a new dean for the College.

Recent innovations such as establishment of the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute, the strength of current programs such as the Tower Center for Political Studies, significant research achievements and the College’s tradition of strong teaching will continue to serve as the foundation of Dedman’s ongoing progress.

“While we will miss Bill, who became a friend to all of us during his time here, his accomplishments and leadership leave us well-positioned to maintain SMU’s rising quality and to attract an outstanding new dean,” said Paul Ludden, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “The success of The Second Century Campaign has brought national recognition and prominence to SMU and Dedman that will serve as a strong foundation for new leadership.”

After May 31, Associate Dean Peter Moore will serve as interim dean of the College. “His past experience in this role and his continuing leadership within Dedman ensure that progress will continue in a seamless fashion,” Ludden continued. A search committee will be chaired by Perkins Dean William Lawrence, and its membership will be named in the next few weeks.

November 5, 2013|For the Record, News|

University appoints new SMU Abroad director

Catherine WinnieAs the new director of SMU Abroad, Catherine Hutchison Winnie brings to the University expertise in developing diverse global experiences for students, including programs for research, internships and service abroad.

Winnie, who began her appointment at the start of the fall term, comes to SMU from Harvard University, where she most recently served as director of the Office of International Education at Harvard College. Winnie holds a doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Swarthmore College.

“Students and faculty at SMU interested in study abroad will find Cathy Winnie’s know-how and enthusiasm contagious and empowering,” says Associate Provost Harold Stanley, who oversees the Office of Education Abroad. “Such interest is increasingly central to SMU’s mission. SMU’s Centennial Strategic Plan includes the goal of increasing participation in study abroad, and in the University Curriculum faculty adopted a global engagement requirement for all undergraduates. Dr. Winnie brings an impressive record of enhancing study abroad and is the right person at the right time to help SMU fulfill its goals.”

Winnie is responsible for overseeing SMU Abroad’s 148 summer, semester and yearlong study abroad programs in 50 countries. More than 500 students participate every year in SMU Abroad programs in Africa, Asia, Europe, Central America, South America and Australia.

“This is an exciting time to be at SMU and to be part of its mission to shape world changers,” Winnie says. “SMU has a strong commitment to a global education both here in Dallas and abroad that helps students succeed in our increasingly interdependent world. The direct global experiences offered by SMU Abroad are not only enriching students’ education, but also building bridges between communities.”

Winnie says she is looking forward to partnering with students, faculty and staff to explore their international goals and help them open doors abroad. “Some students may benefit from a semester or year of coursework at a foreign university, while others may choose an international internship, service work or independent research,” she says. “In all cases, they are gaining new perspectives on problem-solving, leadership and culture, as well as important life skills such as adaptability. When students bring this knowledge back home to SMU and Dallas, our entire community benefits.”

Winnie’s prior appointments include director of Academic Enhancement Programs at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, where she was founding director of the RIT Honors Program as well as the Study Abroad and Fellowships offices.

At Yale University, Winnie was assistant dean and founding director of the Office of International Education and Fellowships of Yale College. In addition, she served as associate dean of international study at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, where she also created an office for graduate international fellowships.

Winnie has traveled extensively and speaks several languages, including German, French and Spanish. She is the recipient of a DAAD Fellowship, a Berlin Airlift Scholarship, and an alumna of the Management Development Program of the Harvard School of Education. She has lectured at the University of Mainz in Germany and at Instituto Meyer in Bogotá, Colombia. She and her husband, Larry Winnie, are the parents of two school-age daughters, Lidya and Samerawit, whom they adopted from Ethiopia in 2005, and a son, Matt, an aspiring screenwriter.

Written by Sarah Hanan

October 9, 2013|News|

Former executive director of Hip-Hop Theater Festival joins SMU

Clyde ValentinSMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has appointed Clyde Valentín to develop and lead new programs that will integrate artistic practices with community engagement in Dallas and other urban centers across the country.

Valentín most recently served as executive director of the New York City-based Hip-Hop Theater Festival (HHTF), where he oversaw its transition to become Hi-ARTS, an arts organization fostering creative, multidisciplinary work, outreach and education through the hip-hop art and culture movement. He will begin his new role at the Meadows School immediately.

“The Meadows School of the Arts is thrilled to welcome Clyde Valentín to our staff,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “Clyde is an innovator in socially engaged art, and for more than a decade, he has created programs that integrate the arts with their communities. His appointment represents a significant step in Meadows’ ongoing mission to engage in deep relationships with the broader Dallas community and to introduce students to the arts’ critical role in social engagement.”

In his new role, Valentín will build on programs that allow students to immerse themselves in Dallas and to engage with community members and arts institutions to create art collaboratively. Through these cultural collaborations and interactions, Valentín and Meadows faculty members and students will work to enhance Dallas’ existing urban infrastructure, encourage people to think of Dallas culture in new ways, and create a cultural energy that supports Dallas – home to the nation’s largest urban arts district – and its growth as a nationally recognized arts center.

“The arts don’t belong only in the classroom or studio – artists need to engage with their communities to remain vital, and SMU Meadows is a pioneer in instilling these values in its students,” said Valentín. “I look forward to working with Meadows faculty and students to explore best practices in myriad multidisciplinary approaches to making art and engaging the community.”

Under Valentín’s leadership, HHTF presentations and productions appeared in major U.S. urban centers including New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. The festival has presented hundreds of artists and introduced diverse national audiences to the stories, people, music, dance and word of hip-hop. The HHTF also has curated visual arts programs since 2007, including a solo show of the work of pioneering sculptor Carlos Mare139 Rodriguez and classes for teens with noted guest artists.

Born and raised in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Valentín served as a Fellow at the DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the Kennedy Center. He also serves on the Art Advisory Board for the Times Square Alliance, is a board member for the Theatre Communications Group, is an advisor for the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Theater Project and serves on the Steering Committee for the Latino Theater Commons.

> Read more from the Meadows School of the Arts website

October 8, 2013|News|

Bob Kehoe named SMU Director of Undergraduate Research

Robert KehoeAssociate Professor Robert Kehoe, coordinator of SMU’s Undergraduate Research Assistantships program and director of undergraduate research in the Department of Physics, has been named the University’s new Director of Undergraduate Research. He reports to James Quick, Associate Vice President for Research.

Kehoe sums up undergraduate research as “one of the single most promising recent developments to enhance student learning and prepare them for their ultimate career or vocation.

“It propels students out of the classroom to confront new questions and opportunities armed with the knowledge they have newly gained,” he says. “It does this while students are still supported by the SMU community. Undergraduate research provides a valuable intermediate space between classroom curriculum and professional possibilities.”

An SMU professor since 2004, Kehoe received his B.A. degree in physics from Earlham College and his Ph.D. degree in high-energy physics from the University of Notre Dame. He completed postdoctoral study in astrophysics and high-energy physics at the University of Michigan and Michigan State University, respectively.

Kehoe is a member of the SMU team on the ATLAS Experiment, the largest detector in the Large Hadron Collider array at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland. His longstanding research into subatomic particle mass played a role in the search for the long-sought Higgs boson. He also contributed directly to the analysis published in summer 2012 that observed a new particle consistent with the Higgs.

His Higgs research focused on controlling and quantifying the large amount of background created in the production of two very massive charged particles used to help detect the previously unknown Higgs boson, as well as on understanding the large theoretical uncertainties involved in the production of those particles.

As a collaborator in Fermilab’s DZero experiment, Kehoe led analysis of data from particle collisions resulting in two leptons, which helped improve measurements of the mass of another heavy subatomic particle called the top quark. Physicists theorize that this particle — because of its sizable mass — is sensitive to the Higgs and therefore may point to it, and that knowing the mass of the top quark narrowed the range of where the Higgs can be expected.

“Professor Kehoe knows good research and good research opportunities when he sees them,” Quick remarked during the announcement of Kehoe’s new duties at the University’s 2012 Engaged Learning Expo on Aug. 27. Kehoe will continue to teach and do research in the Department of Physics.

Kehoe says his new position gives him “a well-defined role and a well-defined way to communicate with people. Now we can have a discussion about undergraduate research that will involve all of SMU.” His primary goal will be to expand and help enrich research opportunities and experiences for SMU undergraduates, he says.

Cooperation among programs and consistent communications to students and parents “are hard to do by individual project coordinators in a way that benefits everyone,” Kehoe adds. An office dedicated to building those connections “opens a whole new avenue for collaboration.”

In addition, Kehoe will help to implement assessment for program effectiveness, as well as integration with the research component of SMU’s Engaged Learning initiative.

Kehoe has already started informal discussions with faculty and will consult with the coordinators of undergraduate research programs across campus. His main focus will be to help existing programs and help develop new ones, he says.

“We’ll take a look at the programs we already have so we can discuss what’s missing,” as well as learning about faculty ideas for new programs, he says. He intends to establish a group to create a strategic plan for undergraduate research “with the input of a broad cross-section of SMU,” including faculty, students and program coordinators.

“My job is not to tell program coordinators what to do,” he says. “My job is to help them produce and coordinate common resources and practices, as well as to disseminate information that will enhance recruitment and retention.”

To this end, Kehoe will direct an expansion of SMU’s online undergraduate research presence, including a new website and the production of an online undergraduate research journal. He will also help create marketing campaigns and other communications for current and prospective students and faculty members.

October 9, 2012|News, Research|

Christensen to serve as interim Engineering Dean as of July 1, 2012

Marc ChristensenMarc Christensen has agreed to serve as dean ad interim of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering effective July 1, 2012. He will serve an initial appointment that ends in August 2013.

Christensen is the school’s Bobby B. Lyle Professor in Engineering Innovation and chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering. He also holds an appointment as a research associate professor in the Department of Physics in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He began his SMU career in 2002.

In addition, Christensen serves as faculty representative to SMU’s Second Century Campaign.

“In my discussions with faculty, staff and students of the Lyle School, Marc received great support for this new role,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “I’m sure that you will join me in working with Marc to ensure the continued success of the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.”

>  Visit the Lyle School of Engineering online

June 1, 2012|For the Record, News|
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