Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Three honored as SMU’s 2014-16 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

SMU Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors 2014-16 by Hillsman S. Jackson

The 2014-16 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors were honored at a meeting of SMU’s Board of Trustees Thursday, May 8 (l to r): Michael Lattman, Paige Ware and Jaime Clark-Soles. Photo: Hillsman S. Jackson

Three of SMU’s best teachers have been named 2014-16 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors, as announced by the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence at the Board of Trustees meeting Thursday, May 8, 2014.

This year’s honorees include Jaime Clark-Soles, New Testament, Perkins School of Theology; Michael Lattman, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; and Paige Ware, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The new members of SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers will join returning members Thomas Carr, Mathematics, Dedman College; Robert Krout, Music Therapy, Meadows School of the Arts; Sheri Kunovich, Sociology, Dedman College; and Luis Maldonado-Peña, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish), Dedman College.

Each year since 2001, the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Awards recognize SMU faculty members for their commitment to and achievements in fostering student learning. “These are faculty whose concerns for higher education go beyond classroom boundaries and often the boundaries of their own discipline,” according to the CTE website. “They represent the highest achievement in reaching the goals of higher education.” The professorships are named for SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler.

Each recipient receives a $10,000 award and membership in SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers for the two years of their appointment as Altshuler Professors. Members participate actively with other members of the Academy to address issues in classroom teaching.

More about this year’s honored professors under the link.

(more…)

Three cheers: SMU Honors Day 2014 is Monday, April 21

Photo from SMU Honors Convocation 2013 by Kim RitzenthalerEvery third Monday in April, SMU takes a day to celebrate the high achievements of students, faculty and staff members in two different ceremonies.

This year’s Honors Convocation and Awards Extravaganza take place on the afternoon and evening of Monday, April 21, 2014.

2014 Honors Convocation award recipients (coming soon)

Eric Bing will deliver the address during the 17th Honors Convocation – celebrating academic achievement at the University and department levels – at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. Bing is professor of global health in the Department of Applied Physiology and Wellness in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He has a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute as senior fellow and director of global health.

Bing has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. At the Bush Institute, he has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the Institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America. In addition, he has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, was released in May 2013.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch Honors Convocation via live streaming Monday, April 21 at smu.edu/live

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2014 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. SMU Student Body President Ramon Trespalacios will speak at the event. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Photo from Honors Convocation 2013 by Kim Ritzenthaler

Find more information on Honors Convocation at the Registrar’s website
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

Simmons Dean David Chard elected chair of National Board for Education Sciences

David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU's Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human DevelopmentDavid Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been elected by fellow board members as chairman of the National Board for Education Sciences, effective immediately.

The U.S. Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Chard to the board in 2012. The 15-member board oversees and directs the work of the Institute of Education Sciences.

“Schools throughout the nation will benefit from David Chard’s leadership of this important board,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His support of evidence-based education practices will help ensure that proven teaching strategies make their way to the classroom.”

One of the board’s functions is to advise the research priorities for the Institute of Education Sciences, the primary research and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education.

The institute collects and analyzes education research data and funds researchers nationwide who are working to improve education outcomes for all students, particularly those at risk. In addition, the institute produces the Nation’s Report Card. As chair, Chard succeeds Bridget Terry Long from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she is academic dean and the Xander Professor of Education.

Supporting education must be more than rhetoric, Chard says. “We can’t talk about how important education is to the future of our country when we invest so little in knowing what works and for whom it works in the classroom,” he says. “Taxpayer dollars have to be wisely invested in education research and the results of research must be incorporated into our classrooms and schools.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

2014 Simmons Luminary Awards honor advocates for children

SMU Simmons Luminary Award logoFour organizations that advocate for the education and well-being of at-risk children will be honored Thursday, Jan. 23, by SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The East Dallas Community Schools, TexProtects, the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children will receive 2014 Luminary Awards at 6:30 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

“This year’s honorees exemplify the power of collaboration and will to create movements that champion children who are poor, neglected or abused,” says David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of the Simmons School. “These children, like any other, deserve a healthy childhood and a good education; the recipients of the Luminary Award shine an important light on what we need to advance.”

• For 35 years, the East Dallas Community Schools (EDCS) have documented the power of high-quality early childhood education, particularly education that starts young and involves the parents. Based on the Montessori education model, staff at the three EDCS campuses provide parents of 550 students with information, encouragement and support. The schools are located in high-risk Dallas areas and open to children ages nine or younger, regardless of income. School founder and director Terry Nelson Ford, a 1974 SMU graduate, will accept the Luminary Award for local excellence.

• The Texas Association for the Protection of Children (TexProtects) was created in 2004 to advocate for reform and better funding of Child Protective Services in Dallas and across the state. The research and advocacy organization is dedicated to representing the needs of Texas children who have been the victims of abuse and neglect by educating decision-makers and the public about child abuse. Founder and director Madeline McClure will accept the Luminary Award for regional achievement.

• The Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children work with state, local and national child advocates to improve the lives of children. Marian Wright Edelman created the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973 after observing poverty’s devastating effects on children while working with Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign in the 1960s. The organization advocates for better health care, child care and nutrition, equal educational opportunities and leadership training for children, particularly disadvantaged children. Jonah Edelman will accept the national Luminary Award for the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children.

The Luminary Award was created in 2009 by the Simmons School to honor individuals and organizations that have shown an extraordinary commitment to improving people’s lives through education. The award is given annually to a local, regional and national recipient.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

Michael McLendon named Centennial Chair in Simmons

Michael McLendon, SMU's Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial ChairMichael McLendon, associate dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been named the Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial Chair. McLendon, a noted higher education policy and leadership scholar, is the Simmons School’s first Centennial Chair – one of three academic positions made possible as part of a $25 million gift from Mr. and Mrs. Simmons in February 2013.

Two endowed positions to be filled in 2014 are the Patsy and Ray Caldwell Centennial Chair, initially to be directed in the Simmons School’s Department of Teaching and Learning, and the Glenn Simmons Endowed Professorship, to be based first in the Department of Applied Physiology and Wellness.

The recipient of numerous teaching and mentoring awards, McLendon teaches graduate courses on public policy and education, university governance and finance, leadership and American public policy.

In 2013 McLendon received national recognition for his research contributing to public debates about K-12 and higher education. He has been a principal investigator or lead consultant on national studies funded by the Lumina Foundation, National Science Foundation and the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges.

McLendon’s widely published research centers primarily on factors influencing policy change at both the state and campus levels, with a particular focus on how political behavior shapes states’ policy choices. He also has studied the effects of campus and state policies on college student success.

“Through his superb scholarship and dedication to the higher education field, Michael will integrate research-based solutions with practice and policy, and make a mark on the way colleges and universities evolve,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons dean of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. “The Simmons School is enormously privileged to have him fill the school’s first Centennial chair. His caliber of scholarship and teaching immediately elevates us in important state and national policy conversations.”

“I’m deeply honored to hold the Simmons School’s first endowed Centennial Chair,” McLendon said. “My aim is to help position the Simmons School and SMU as research leaders around matters of education policy and policy reform and as conveners of important conversations nationally on the future of higher education.”

McLendon joined SMU in 2012 after serving as a professor of public policy and higher education at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College, where he was executive associate dean and chief of staff from 2008 to 2011. He holds a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in higher education from Florida State University and a B.A. in political science from Baylor University. Before his doctoral studies, the Texas native served as a policy analyst in the Florida House of Representatives and as a staff member in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C.

In addition to the creation of these three academic positions, the Simmons’ recent financial commitment also will fund a new building for the expanding programs of the school. The new facility will be named Harold Clark Simmons Hall, in honor of Mr. Simmons, at the request of Mrs. Simmons, a 1957 SMU alumna.

> Read the full story from SMU News

J Term program adds SMU-in-Taos for 2014

After the unprecedented success of the 2013 J Term at SMU-in-Plano, the program is expanding to SMU-in-Taos for 2014. Set for Jan. 6-15, J Term offers more than 50 courses at a reduced tuition rate.

Students can complete one three-credit-hour course in eight concentrated days at SMU-in-Plano or SMU-in-Taos. The initial deadline for J Term applications is Friday, Nov. 22.

The J Term (short for January Term) allows students to complete one three-credit-hour course at a discounted tuition rate before the start of the spring semester. For J Term 2014, regular undergraduate students will pay a reduced tuition rate of $1,154 per credit hour ($3,462 per course). Payment is due by Thursday, Dec. 19. Parking is free on the SMU-in-Plano campus, and no decal is required.

Watch a new video about J Term from SMU News’ Myles Taylor

J Term Director Kate Livingston says the program allows students to use the time between the fall and spring terms to focus on a course of interest or stay on track for graduation. Students also can fulfill General Education or University Curriculum requirements.

This year’s offerings include courses from the Cox School of Business, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Lyle School of Engineering, Meadows School of the Arts and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

J Term courses are not initially available for registration through Access.SMU. To enroll, students should meet with an adviser to select appropriate courses and then submit the online J Term application form before the deadline. After the Thanksgiving holiday, students will be notified of their final J Term course selection and given permission to officially enroll in Access.SMU.

Students participating in J Term at SMU-in-Plano will be responsible for their own housing; discounted hotel rooms are available at the Marriott TownPlace Suites, about a mile from the SMU-in-Plano campus. Shuttle service is also available. Information about housing at SMU-in-Taos during J Term is available here.

For more information, e-mail jterm@smu.edu or call 214-768-3657.

> Learn more from the J Term homepage at smu.edu/jterm

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

Provost announces names of 11 SMU Faculty in Residence

SMU's southeast campus residential complex

Artist’s rendering of SMU’s southeast campus residential complex, which will help support the University’s Residential Commons experience.

SMU Provost Paul Ludden has announced the appointment of eight new Faculty in Residence (FiRs) selected in the Spring 2013 semester. The new FiRs join the three “founding FiRs” as the first full cohort to become part of the University’s new Residential Commons (RC).

Faculty in Residence are chosen in a competitive selection process. When the Commons program launches in Fall 2014, each FiR will live in a residence hall and work with student leaders and Student Affairs staff to shape the Residential Commons experience.

> SMU Forum: Three SMU professors named first Faculty in Residence

Four FiRs have moved into residence halls a year early as part of the Residential Commons transition process: Ann Batenburg, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development; Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Robert Krout, Music Therapy, Meadows School of the Arts; and Charles Wuest, English, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

The full list of faculty members who have been appointed for a 3-4 year term, and the halls where they will take up residence:

  • Ann Batenburg, Teaching and Learning – Virginia-Snider RC *
  • Martin Camp, School of Law – Residential Commons 4 (under construction)
  • Miroslava Detcheva, Spanish – McElvaney RC
  • Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering – Loyd RC (under construction) *†
  • Mark Kerins, Film and Media Arts – Morrison-McGinnis RC
  • Rita Kirk, Communication Studies – Armstrong RC (under construction)
  • Robert Krout, Music Therapy – Mary Hay/Peyton/Shuttles RC *†
  • Will Power, Theatre – Residential Commons 1 (under construction)
  • David Son, Chemistry – Boaz RC
  • Tom Tunks, Music – Residential Commons 3 (under construction) *†
  • Elizabeth Wheaton, Economics – Cockrell-McIntosh RC

* Living in residence during the 2013-14 academic year
† One of SMU’s three original Faculty in Residence, the “Founding FiRs

Along with the 11 FiRs, 23 Faculty Affiliates were selected and have been working in every residence hall on campus since the beginning of the year. For more information on participating in the Faculty Affiliate program, contact Jeff Grim, Residence Life and Student Housing.

> Learn more at the SMU Residential Commons website: smu.edu/residentialcommons

Three receive 2013 Distinguished University Citizen Awards

Three faculty members were honored with SMU’s 2013 Distinguished University Citizen Award at the Faculty Breakfast held Saturday, May 18 before Commencement. This year’s recipients are:

  • Robert Kehoe, Physics, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Dennis Simon, Political Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Paige Ware, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

The award winners became part of “a strong list of distinguished faculty who have served SMU extraordinarily well and whose examples continue to energize SMU and encourage each of us,” said Associate Provost Harold Stanley in presenting the honors.

The award, given by the Provost’s Office, honors three faculty members each year for service and activities that benefit students and the University’s academic mission.

SMU Honors Day 2013 is Monday, April 15

SMU celebrates the high achievements of students, faculty and staff members with two ceremonies that take place every third Monday of April. This year’s Honors Day Convocation and Awards Extravaganza take place on the afternoon and evening of Monday, April 15, 2013.

2013 Honors Day Convocation award recipients

Paige Ware, associate professor of teaching and learning in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, will deliver the address during the 16th Honors Day Convocation at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The ceremony celebrates academic achievement at the University and department levels. Ware, a Ford Research Fellow, is an expert on the use of multimedia technologies for fostering language and literacy growth among adolescents, as well as on the use of internet-based communication for promoting intercultural awareness.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Day Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch Honors Day Convocation via live streaming April 15 on the Registrar’s website

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2013 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Find more information on Honors Day Convocation at the Registrar’s website
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

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