Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Students honor professors’ excellence with 2015 HOPE Awards

SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 45 exceptional University educators at the 2015 HOPE Awards Banquet in February.

HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

Eric Larson, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering, was honored as 2015 Professor of the Year.

The complete list of 2015 HOPE Award honorees:

Cox School of Business

  • Judy Foxman, Marketing
  • Hyungshin Park, Accounting
  • Robert Puelz, Real Estate, Insurance and Business Law

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Adriana Aceves, Mathematics
  • Paul Avey, Tower Center for Political Studies
  • Greg Brownderville, English
  • David Michael Crow, Psychology
  • LeeAnn Derdeyn, English/Discernment and Discourse
  • Melissa Dowling, History/Classical Studies
  • John Duca, Economics
  • James K. Hopkins, History
  • Vanessa Hopper, English
  • Matthew Keller, Sociology
  • Michael Lattman, Chemistry
  • David Lee, Anthropology
  • Judy Newell, Mathematics
  • Rachel Ney, World Languages and Literatures/French
  • Jennifer O’Brien, Chemistry
  • Wei Qu, World Languages and Literatures/Chinese
  • Stephen Robertson, Statistical Science
  • Bivin Sadler, Statistical Science
  • Martha Satz, English
  • Sam Ross Sloan, English
  • Tom Stone, English
  • Thierry Tirado, World Languages and Literatures/French
  • Nick Tsarevsky, Chemistry
  • John Wise, Biological Sciences
  • Patty Wisian-Neilson, Chemistry
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering
  • Eric Larson, Computer Science and Engineering
  • Peter Raad, Mechanical Engineering

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Hank Hammett, Music/Meadows Opera Theatre
  • Debora Hunter, Art
  • Mark Kerins, Film and Media Arts
  • Suzanne Larkin, Advertising
  • Melissa Murray, Music
  • Tom Tunks, Music
  • Ben Voth, Communication Studies

Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

  • Yolette Garcia, Assistant Dean for External Affairs and Outreach
  • Lynn Jacobs, Applied Physiology and Wellness
  • Kelyn Rola, Applied Physiology and Wellness

Dedman School of Law

  • Martin Camp, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
  • Meghan Ryan, Criminal Law and Procedure, Torts

Perkins School of Theology

  • Abraham Smith, New Testament

Simmons School creates scholarship fund honoring Peter Gifford

Peter Gifford portraitSMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development has established the Peter B. Gifford Memorial Scholarship Fund in memory of their colleague and friend.

During his 41-year SMU career, Gifford served as assistant professor of physical education (1973-80) and then as associate professor and chair of the Department of Health and Physical Education (1980-92) within Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

In 1990, he became director of the SMU Wellness program within the Office of Student Affairs and served in that position for 17 years. From 2007 to 2012 he served as chair of the Applied Physiology and Wellness Department within the Simmons School. He passed away Nov. 5, 2014 at the age of 69.

Gifford was instrumental in creating both the Wellness and the Applied Physiology and Sports Management programs at SMU. He received a Rotunda Outstanding Professor Award in 2013.

To make a gift in memory of Peter Gifford, visit the SMU Giving site and choose the Peter B. Gifford Memorial Fund from the drop-down menu.

Best-selling author and presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin delivers Tate Lecture, Feb. 24, 2015

150455TateLectureGoodwin

Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, best-selling author and presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin will visit SMU on Tuesday, Feb. 24 to deliver the Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture. Continuing the 33rd season of Tate Lectures, Goodwin will offer her insight and opinion on current events.

GoodwinDorisKearns_credit Eric LevinAfter earning a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, Goodwin began her career as an assistant to President Lyndon Johnson in his last year in the White House. She later assisted President Johnson in preparation of his memoirs. As a Pulitzer-Prize wining writer of historical biographies, Goodwin has won wide praise for her meticulous, in-depth research and ability to chronicle both the public and private lives of her subjects.

In addition to her six critically acclaimed and New York Times best-selling books, Goodwin’s work has also been featured on the big screen. Based in part on her award-winning Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, Goodwin paired with Steven Spielberg at DreamWorks Studio to create the film Lincoln. The film grossed $275 million at the box office and eared 12 Academy Award nominations, including an Academy Award for actor Daniel Day-Lewis for his portrayal of President Abraham Lincoln.

All SMU students, faculty and staff are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum segment at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m., and seats may be reserved online. 

Tickets to The Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture are sold out. However, SMU students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-serve basis. 

> Learn more about the 33rd SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series

> For additional information, contact the SMU Tate Series

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 18, 2015

Emanuel Cleaver II

Emanuel Cleaver II visits Perkins Chapel as a guest preacher on Thursday,, Feb. 19th.

The Cultural Realities of Cancer: Visiting SMU under the Department of Anthropology, Dr. Deborah O. Erwin, Director of the Office of Cancer Health Disparities Research at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, will explore “The Cultural Realities of Cancer” and how individuals are impacted by this diagnosis. This free event will take place in the McCord Auditorium on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 5 p.m. For more information, email Pamela Hogan.

Emanuel Cleaver II: Sponsored by the Perkins School of Theology Black Seminarians Association, U.S. Representative and United Methodist clergyman Emanuel Cleaver II will visit the Perkins Chapel as a guest preacher on Thursday, Feb. 19, at 11:30 a.m., during the regular worship service. Celebrating Black History Month, the theme for this worship service is “We’ve Come This Far by Faith and We Won’t Stop Now!” For more information about the chapel service and Rev. Cleaver’s visit, email Ailey Pope, the chair of the Black Seminarians Association at Perkins.  

Godbey Lecture Series: In honor of the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, the Godbey Lecture Series presents “Perspectives on Magna Carta” featuring three SMU professors as they illuminate the history and contribution of the document. The SMU professors include; Jeremy Q. Adams, Professor of History, Joshua Tate, Associate Professor of Law, and Ada-Maria Kuskowski, Assistant Professor of History. The event will take place on Thursday, Feb. 19, 5:30 p.m. in the Gene and Jerry Jones Great Hall, Meadows Museum. While the lecture is free and open to the public, guests are asked to please register online. For more information, visit the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute webpage or email Elizabeth Fieldling. 

Meadows Virtuosi Players: SMU Meadows School of the Arts presents “Meadows Virtuosi Players” on Saturday, Feb. 21, at 6:30 p.m., in the Caruth Auditorium. Formed in 2012, the Meadows Virtuosi Players concert series features select Meadows student musicians performing side-by-side with their faculty colleagues. This Saturday, directors Andrés Diaz and Matt Albert will be joined by Meadows voice faculty member Camille King. For more information, call 214.768.2787.

Doris Kearns Goodwin

Doris Kearns Goodwin

Tate Lecture Series: SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series presents Doris Kearns Goodwin, on Tuesday, Feb. 24. Goodwin is a Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, best-selling author and presidential historian. While The Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture is already sold out, SMU students, faculty and staff are welcome to participate in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. 

Research Day 2015: On Wednesday, Feb. 25, SMU graduate and undergraduate students are invited and encouraged to present results of ongoing and completed SMU-based research. Guests are welcomed to meet over 160 students engaged in research, and discover opportunities for future collaboration and entrepreneurship. The event will take place in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, Promenade Ballroom, from 2-5 p.m. For additional information, view the 2015 Research Day Catalog or email Sarah Sage. 

SMU’s Simmons School honors advocates for education with 2015 Luminary Awards

SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development honored three outstanding advocates for students from pre-K through college with 2015 Luminary Awards on Thursday, Jan. 22.

This year’s honorees:

Michael Sorrell, president, Paul Quinn CollegeMichael Sorrell, president of Dallas’ Paul Quinn College, has brought new recognition, programs and funding to the 142-year-old historically black college. A former Dallas attorney and special assistant to President Bill Clinton’s executive staff, Sorrell and the college have received awards including the 2012 Historically Black College and Universities Male President of the Year, 2012 Top Liberal Arts HBCUs in America and 2013 HBCU Best Business Program.

Even as Sorrell develops his vision for Paul Quinn, he continues his own education: He is an Ed.D. candidate in the University of Pennsylvania’s executive doctorate in higher education management program.

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children logo• The Luke Waites Center for Dyslexia and Learning Disorders at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas developed the first definition of dyslexia in 1968. Waites had established in 1965 one of the first programs in the world to identify and treat children with learning disorders, particularly dyslexia. Since then, the center’s team has demonstrated that, through research, evaluation and treatment, children with dyslexia can learn to read and be successful despite their learning differences.

The Dyslexia Training Program, a two-year intervention program, was developed at the Waites Center and is used throughout the United States. Medical Director Jeffrey Black and Administrative Director Gladys Kolenovsky lead the Waites Center, which provides diagnostic evaluations and recommendations for hundreds of children with learning disorders each year. The center also provides training for teachers and learning therapists and sponsors research on the causes and treatment of dyslexia.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America logoBig Brothers, Big Sisters of America was created in 1904 to bring role models into the lives of at-risk children. Today the mentoring program serves 300,000 children in the United States and 12 countries, providing and monitoring one-to-one volunteer mentors who develop positive relationships with children ages 6 to 18. Big Brothers, Big Sisters also sponsors African American, Native American and Hispanic mentoring programs in addition to programs for children of military parents and children of incarcerated parents.

Research shows that children in the program get along better with their families and are less likely to engage in risky behaviors. Participation in Big Brothers, Big Sisters also has a measurable, positive effect on education. Research shows that 87 percent of children in the program maintained or improved in their educational expectations and 84 percent maintained or improved their grades. Participants are more likely to graduate from high school and reach a higher lever of education. Pam Iorio, CEO of Big Brothers, Big Sisters, accepted the award.

“This year’s awards show the power of individuals,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean. “We see mentors give of themselves as they become a consistent presence in the lives of boys and girls who need them. We find teachers and doctors taking extra steps and care to treat children with learning disorders. And lastly, we look to a true leader in higher education who rebuilds confidence and direction in a historically black college. Their work exemplifies what all of us can do to elevate what’s important to the development of children and youth.”

The Luminary Award was created in 2009 by the Simmons School to honor individuals and organizations that have shown an extraordinary commitment to improving people’s lives through education. The award is given annually to a local, regional and national recipient.

Load More Posts