New SMU ID cards represent new approach to campus security

Alison Tweedy

New SMU ID cards represent new approach to campus security

Designs for new SMU ID cards 2014For the first time in nearly a decade, SMU will issue a new form of ID card for campus access – and users have the option to choose their own best look for the new-look identification.

Students, faculty and staff members may visit IDCard.smu.edu to upload the passport-style photo of their choice – headshot, face forward, solid background – for the new, high-tech ID cards that will be issued during the summer. The deadline for submitting a new photo is Tuesday, April 22, 2014.

If you’re happy with your current photo, you may keep it. Your new ID card will be issued automatically.

The cosmetic changes are being driven by a new approach to building security, says Alison Tweedy, senior director, Campus Services. The University plans to equip campus buildings with proximity readers that activate with a wave or a tap rather than a swipe from an ID card. The new SMU data center and Residential Commons buildings, as well as the renovated Moody Coliseum, already have these readers or will install them before opening.

“That means we have to get the right kind of card into people’s hands,” Tweedy says. The new IDs are equipped with radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips about the size of a grain of rice, similar to those used in U.S. passports since 2007. The cards remain the same size and thickness as their non-RFID-equipped counterparts and will still fit into a standard-size card wallet, Tweedy says. “They will also be much more difficult to duplicate than in the past,” she adds.

Additionally, the new IDs will have public safety information printed on the back and distinctive new designs that instantly differentiate student cards from faculty/staff cards. “The new look is really exciting, and it’s a great opportunity for SMU to get its brand out there,” Tweedy says.

The cards will no longer have printed bar codes, but they will still have a magnetic swipe strip for use with meal plans and Pony Express cash.

Campus Services beta-tested the system in December 2013 with ID cards issued for occupants of Moody Coliseum and the data center. “Our goal is to have the new cards in all faculty and staff hands in June,” Tweedy says. Each individual will receive an activation code with the new ID card and must activate them as they would a credit card.

AARO students will receive new cards in July; all students enrolled for the Fall 2014 term will have new cards before the start of the academic year.

More on the new ID cards and campus security features will appear in future SMU Forum posts.

> Upload your photo at IDCard.smu.edu

April 17, 2014|News, Save the Date|

University completes property swap with Chi Omega

SMU Chi Omega House at 3014 Daniel Avenue

The Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of SMU’s Division of Student Affairs in a swap for University property at 3034 Daniel. The sorority will build its new house at the northeast corner of Daniel and Durham Street. Photo from the SMU Chi Omega website.

SMU has made a property trade with one of its sorority chapters to take effect Monday, April 1, 2013. The Iota Alpha chapter of Chi Omega at SMU will build its new house at 3034 Daniel Avenue, while the current Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of the Division of Student Affairs.

Chi Omega will begin construction on a new house this year, and its membership wanted to locate the facility closer to the hub of SMU’s sorority activity. In 2012, sorority members began discussions about the exchange with SMU vice presidents Brad Cheves, Development and External Affairs; Chris Regis, Business and Finance, and Lori White, Student Affairs. Cheves helped negotiate the swap.

Later this spring, the sorority will begin abatement and demolition of the SMU Faculty Club building currently located at 3034 Daniel, on the northeast corner of Daniel Avenue and Durham Street. The new Chi Omega house is scheduled to open at its new address in Fall 2014.

The University plans to relocate the Faculty Club to a new visitors’ center, currently in the planning stages. Plans for the facility at 3014 Daniel will be announced at a later date.

The move may have a minimal short-term impact on Faculty Club events such as the Distinguished Luncheons, which are frequently held in larger venues due to high levels of interest. In addition, Faculty Club members will continue to gather in the Faculty/Staff Dining Room in RFoC @ Lee.

In recent years, the Faculty Club has provided office space for Alumni Relations and Engagement and the Faculty Senate. Both offices have moved to the University’s East Campus on North Central Expressway – Alumni Relations to the 6200 Building and the Faculty Senate to the 12th floor of Expressway Tower at 6116 North Central.

The month of March has been devoted to removing and storing all Faculty Club property from the 3034 Daniel house, as well as reusable fixtures ranging from faucets to door handles, says Alison Tweedy, senior director of campus services. “Facility Services will take out anything that can be reused or repurposed,” she says.

The SMU Faculty Club, which is open to both faculty and staff members, was founded in 1921 as a social club for male faculty members. A women’s club was founded in 1928, and the two merged in 1963. Both clubs held their meetings in Atkins Hall (now Clements Hall) until the male club moved to the second floor of McFarlin Auditorium in the 1940s.

As Faculty Senate president in 1972-73, Ruth P. Morgan, who would later become University provost, made it a priority to establish a new home for the Faculty Club. Provost H. Neil McFarland provided the property at 3034 Daniel Avenue, then a sorority house, in 1973. The club was officially chartered in that location on August 6, 1973.

March 28, 2013|News|

Faculty, staff join student-led fundraiser for Haiti

heart-beats-for-haiti-600.jpg

The entire SMU community is responding to the disastrous earthquake in Haiti with a student-led relief campaign. SMU’s Heart Beats for Haiti seeks to raise relief funds over a 3-week period through Feb. 15, 2010.

Students, faculty and staff members will have the opportunity to purchase a small paper heart for $5 and a larger heart for $10 in Umphrey Lee Center and the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The buyer can sign his or her name to the heart, which will then be displayed in the Student Center. Donations of every size will be accepted, and Pony Express funds may be used to give to the effort.

All funds raised will be given to the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund.

Patrick Kobler, student body president, and seniors Nicola Muchnikoff and Rachel Carey came up with the idea before the spring term started.

“We just felt the magnitude of the situation is such that we had to do something as a student body and a community,” Kobler says. “The news has been so dire, and the need has been so great, and we at SMU are so lucky – we need to get involved.”

Kobler contacted Faculty Senate President Fred Olness and Staff Association President Alison Tweedy to help coordinate a campuswide effort.

“The Senate will work to spread the word about the Haiti fund-raiser so our community can provide broad support for Haitians in need,” Olness says.

“I think it’s a wonderful idea and opportunity for the entire SMU community to work together,” Tweedy says. “I hope everyone will participate and give what they can.”

Faculty and staff members will earn one Wellpower Spirit Point for their donation to the student campaign, says Mary Stall, HR specialist in organizational effectiveness in SMU’s Department of Human Resources.

Cash and checks will be accepted; checks should be made out to “SMU’s Heart Beats for Haiti.” Checks may be sent by mail to Lydia Dale, SMU Box 750436, Dallas TX 75275-0436.

Visit SMU’s Heart Beats for Haiti on the Student Senate website

January 26, 2010|News|
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