SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

Alexis McCrossen

SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

A panel of SMU faculty members from a wide range of disciplines will examine the history of and emerging ramifications for the concept of privacy in the 21st century at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West Ballroom.

The program launches the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s IMPACT (Interdisciplinary Meetings to Address Pressing Current Themes) series of symposia. Sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, the symposium is free and open to the public and includes a 3 p.m. reception.

Lee Cullum, journalist and fellow in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will moderate the discussion. Panelists include SMU professors whose studies touch on some aspect of privacy:

  • George Holden is professor of psychology in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Holden specializes in developmental psychology with a focus on family violence and parent-child interactions. His current research involves analyzing home audio recordings of mothers and their preschoolers. “Psychologists are in the business of exploring people’s private lives — such as their secret thoughts and behavior behind closed doors,” Holden says. “Consequently, we are confronted with various thorny issues.”
  • Alexis McCrossen is associate professor of history in Dedman College whose specialty is U.S. social and cultural history. “Privacy is an institution that came of age in early modern Europe,” she says.
  • Beth Newman is associate professor of English and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program in Dedman College. Newman, whose specialty is 19th-century British literature, says “The concept of privacy developed alongside the rise of the novel, which reinforced its importance — especially for the middle class.”
  • Santanu Roy is professor of economics in Dedman College. Roy’s research interests are in industrial organization, natural resources and environment, international and economic growth.
  • Mary Spector is associate professor of law and director of the Consumer Law Project – both in Dedman School of Law. Spector’s research interests are in the areas of consumer credit, landlord-tenant law and clinical legal education.
  • Suku Nair is chair and professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering. Nair’s research interests are in network and systems security and reliability.

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute was made possible by a $5 million gift from the Dedman Family and the Dedman Foundation. The Institute was created to bring together faculty and students from the humanities, sciences and social sciences for collaborative research and other programs. The Institute will host annual seminars bringing together faculty, graduate and undergraduate students and members of the community to discuss global issues.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story at SMU News

October 30, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 13, 2009

land-of-necessity-bookcover-200.jpgClubhouse Lunch: Assistant Professor Hector Rivera, director of the Center for Child and Community Development in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, speaks on “Integrating English Language Learners Into Our Schools – What Do We Need to Know?” at noon Oct. 14 in the Faculty Club. The lecture is part of the SMU Faculty Club’s Clubhouse Lunch series. Lunch is $5, or feel free to bring your own.

Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Associate Professor of History Alexis McCrosson discusses her new book, including the visual rhetoric of scarcity and abundance in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands and their history of “institutions of abundance” such as department and “big box” stores, in “Land of Necessity: Consumer Culture in the United States-Mexico Borderlands” at noon Oct. 14 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Presented by the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Dedman College. Bring your lunch.

Long live the King: The Meadows Wind Ensemble spends a musical evening with an American icon in “Elvis Has Left the Building” at 8 p.m. Oct. 16 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The program features an Elvis “Vegas” medley, Michael Daugherty’s Dead Elvis, Eric Whitacre’s Godzilla Eats Las Vegas and a set of works by Frank Zappa – as well as a possible appearance by “the King” himself. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Music for a cause: The Meadows Chorale opens its season with a program of contemporary music that celebrates the passage of life into afterlife at 2 p.m. Oct. 18 in Perkins Chapel. “Each Shall Arise” features works by Tarik O’Regan, Morten Lauridsen and Eric William Barnum. In lieu of admission, online donations are requested for the North Texas Food Bank. Food items may also be donated in person at the concert. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

October 13, 2009|Calendar Highlights|
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