Eighteen SMU faculty members receive tenure, promotions effective Sept. 1, 2016

Adam Herring

Eighteen SMU faculty members receive tenure, promotions effective Sept. 1, 2016

Eighteen distinguished SMU faculty members are newly tenured as associate professors or have been promoted to full professorships to begin the 2016-17 academic year.

The following individuals received tenure or promotion effective Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016:

Cox School of Business

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Michael Braun, Marketing

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences
  • Scott Norris, Mathematics
  • Rubén Sánchez-Godoy, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish)
  • Hervé Tchumkam, World Languages and Literatures (French)
  • Nicolay Tsarevsky, Chemistry

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Matthew Hornbach, Earth Sciences
  • Thomas Knock, History
  • Rajani Sudan, English

Dedman School of Law

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • W. Keith Robinson, Law (patent law, intellectual property)
  • David O. Taylor, Law (patent law, patent litigation, federal civil procedure, appellate advocacy, contract law)

Lyle School of Engineering

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Ping (Peggy) Gui, Electrical Engineering

Meadows School of the Arts

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Jake Batsell, Journalism
  • Hye Jin Yoon, Advertising

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • H. Clifton Forbis, Music (Voice)
  • Adam Herring, Art History
  • Lisa Pon, Art History

Perkins School of Theology

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Jaime Clark-Soles, Theology (New Testament)
August 8, 2016|For the Record, News|

SMU-record 14 professors receive 2014-15 Sam Taylor Fellowships

UMC General Board of Higher Education and Ministry logoFourteen SMU faculty members – a University-record number – have received 2014-15 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

Edward Countryman, History, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, for research at the Canadian National Archives for his book on Joseph Brant and colonial America.

Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, to work in the Getty Museum’s archives for his book on the history of Buddhist influence in art.

Kathleen Gallagher, Arts Management and Arts Entrepreneurship, Meadows School of the Arts, to conduct interviews in Puerto Rico regarding non-profit organization life cycles.

Adam Herring, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to include color plates in his monograph on Inca artworks.

Peter Kupfer, Music History, Meadows School of the Arts, to survey how viewers understand cultural meanings of classical music used in advertising.

Rita Linjuan Men, Communication Studies, Meadows School of the Arts, to collect survey data for analysis of transparency in organizations’ social media communications.

Rebekah Miles, Perkins School of Theology, for archival research and interviews regarding Ursula Niebuhr’s works.

Brian Molanphy, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, to support his Spring 2015 artist residency at l’Ecole de céramique de Provence in France.

Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, for inclusion of illustrations in her forthcoming book.

Christopher Roos, Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, to support collaborative research in Tasmania.

Brett Story, Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, for load-testing materials to study collapse resistance in buildings.

Peng Tao, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, for software to study protein-folding and unfolded protein response.

Jenia Turner, Dedman School of Law, to survey prosecutors and defense attorneys nationally regarding the U.S. criminal justice system.

Hye Jin Yoon, Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts, for a survey regarding efficacy of advertising appeals to individualism versus collectivism.

December 12, 2014|For the Record, News, Research, Year of the Faculty|

Faculty books for giving (and keeping)

(Originally published Dec. 6, 2007.)

'Psychology of the Simpsons' coverWith subjects ranging from the art of the Maya to the psychology of America’s favorite dysfunctional animated family, SMU faculty members and researchers published or won awards for a bevy of books during 2007. We’ve made a list, and invite you to add your own favorite books in the comments. Read more.

(more…)

December 13, 2007|News|

Things we did this summer

Dallas County teens dance in 'Our Book of Life'The Meadows School of the Arts hosted Our Book of Life and Reflections of Life, featuring art, poetry, music and performance by at-risk youth from all over Dallas County. The performance and art exhibit were staged by Creative Solutions, a partnership between the Dallas County Juvenile Department and Big Thought.

“It is important to let our young people know that where you have been does not determine who you can become,” said Meadows Dean José Antonio Bowen. “[We are] proud to be part of the most successful program in the country for youth under pressure and allow them to dream beyond their environment. These students have great potential, and all they need is for someone to believe in them.”

Nearly 144 girls entering grades 8 through 12 attended SMU’s Engineering Camp for Girls in June. The camp is part of the University’s Gender Parity Initiative directed by Betsy Willis, a program of the Institute for Engineering Education at SMU designed to help fill a projected shortage of engineers by recruiting girls and women to their ranks. Read more from The Dallas Morning News.

TrampasFront-Eiseley-125.jpgSMU-in-Taos students helped restore the historic San Jose de Gracia Catholic Church in Las Trampas, New Mexico, tearing down a deteriorating adobe wall surrounding the church’s cemetery and patching the exterior adobe walls. The project was part of Adam Herring‘s class on “Art and Architecture of Hispanic New Mexico.” Read more from The Albuquerque Journal. (Right, at work with senior art history major Eiseley Tauginas, who blogged about her SMU-in-Taos experiences for the University’s Student Adventures site. Photo courtesy of The Albuquerque Journal.)

August 17, 2007|News|
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