Campus law enforcement accreditation team to visit SMU

accreditation

Campus law enforcement accreditation team to visit SMU

An invited team of assessors from the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA) will examine all aspects of SMU Police Department policy, procedures, management, operation and support services in September, SMU Police Chief Rick Shafer announced today.

The visit, scheduled for Sept. 22, 2013, is part of a voluntary accreditation process by which the assessment team verifies that the SMU Police Department meets IACLEA’s standards. IACLEA accreditation is a highly prized recognition of campus public safety professional excellence, Shafer said.

The SMU Police Department must comply with 203 different IACLEA standards to achieve accreditation. “It’s important to us to adhere to industry standards and to be familiar with the latest and most effective law-enforcement techniques,” Shafer said. “Outside assessments such as the accreditation process help to confirm our status as a leading-edge police department.”

As part of the accreditation process, University community members, agency employees and the public are invited to offer comments. Individuals may give telephone comments directly to the assessment team at 214-768-0803 from 8-11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 23.

Written comments about the SMU Police Department’s ability to comply with the accreditation standards may be submitted to IACLEA Accreditation, 342 North Main St., West Hartford CT 06117-2507.

All comments must address the department’s ability to comply with IACLEA standards. A copy of the standards is available for viewing at the SMU Police Department, located at 3128 Dyer St. on the SMU campus. To view the standards, please contact SMU Police Sgt. Brian Kelly, accreditation manager for the SMU Police Department, at 214-768-1577.

The assessment team is composed of experienced campus law enforcement professionals from outside of Texas. The assessors are Capt. Gary Heller, Amtrak Police Department, team leader; and Capt. John K. Jacobs, University of Richmond.

The assessors will review written materials, interview individuals, and inspect facilities where compliance can be witnessed. Once they complete their review, they will report back to IACLEA, which will decide if the SMU Police Department will receive renewed accredited status, Kelly said.

Accreditation is for four years, during which the department must submit annual reports attesting to continued compliance with those standards under which it was initially accredited.

> Visit the SMU Police Department online

August 22, 2013|News, Save the Date|

Memorial Health Center achieves national accreditation

SMU's Memorial Health CenterSMU’s Memorial Health Center has earned renewed accreditation by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), says Patrick Hite, FACHE, executive director, Health Services.

To achieve its status as an accredited organization, the Health Center passed a series of nationally recognized standards for the provision of quality health care as set by the AAAHC. Almost 5,000 ambulatory health care organizations across the United States are accredited by the AAAHC.

“Accreditation underscores our long-standing commitment to providing the highest possible levels of quality care to the community we serve,” Hite says. “We are very pleased and proud to have achieved accreditation; we believe this has helped us improve the quality of patient care and that our patients are the ultimate benefactors from our participation in the accreditation program.”

Ambulatory health care organizations seeking accreditation by AAAHC undergo an extensive on-site, peer-based survey of their facilities and services. The types of organizations that can apply for such accreditation include single- and multi-specialty group practices, ambulatory and office-based surgery centers, college and university health services, managed care systems, dental group practices, community health centers, and occupational health centers.

The Memorial Health Center has been accredited since 1998. The most recent survey extends its accreditation through 2014.

> Visit SMU’s Memorial Health Center online
> Learn more about the AAAHC

September 15, 2011|News|

Tune In: Getting connected with ‘Unbridled Learning’

SMU is answering students’ calls for learning opportunities outside the classroom with a new program that will provide both structure and funding for their endeavors.

The University’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) – “Unbridled Learning: Engaged Learning Beyond the Classroom” – will allow all SMU undergraduate students to participate in at least one extensive experiential learning activity prior to graduation. The program will allow undergraduates to build on their formal education through participation in structured experiential learning beyond the classroom.

Click the YouTube screen to learn more, or watch the Unbridled Learning video in a new window. video

> Visit SMU’s Unbridled Learning homepage

March 22, 2011|Tune In|

Faculty, staff and students discuss proposed University curriculum changes

The SMU community got its first detailed overview of proposed changes to the General Education Curriculum at a town hall meeting April 22.

New emphases on “demonstrated competencies” and broader double-counting of courses mark the proposed changes, as well as a new second-language requirement for all students. The proposals also will make the curriculum friendlier to long and multiple majors and minors and to transfer students from outside and inside the University, said committee co-chairs Dennis Cordell, Dedman College, and Tom Tunks, Associate Provost.

The University Curriculum – so called as the only course of study to be completed by all SMU undergraduates – is the result of work conducted by the General Education Review Committee. The committee was charged with completing the curriculum review, formulating recommendations for needed changes, and presenting a proposal for a new general education curriculum to Provost Paul Ludden by April 25, 2009.

Presentation of the proposal leads into the review’s next stage, in which a broad cross-section of faculty and staff members will address details such as identifying courses to keep or modify and developing metrics and other details, Tunks said. The new curriculum is expected to be in place for the 2011-12 academic year.

The length of the review process allows the University to “get it right,” as well as ensure that funds are in place for implementation, Tunks said. It also accomplishes the important objective of getting the SMU community involved and invested, he added.

“Through broad participation in developing the curriculum, what we develop is ownership of the curriculum,” Tunks said. “We tend to be more enthusiastic about the things we own than about things that were pushed at us by someone else. We look at this as a chance to build community at the University.”

Find an outline of the proposed changes and more information at The General Education Review homepage.

Complete listing of SMU’s current General Education Curriculum
Initial curriculum review planning guidelines
Essential learning outcomes
GEC opinion survey
GEC Review blog, open to the SMU community

April 28, 2009|News|

Provost gives ‘cautiously optimistic’ budget outlook at faculty meeting

(Originally published Jan. 27, 2009.)

SMU Provost Paul Ludden presented a “cautiously optimistic” budget picture for the 2009-10 academic year at the 2009 Spring General Faculty Meeting Jan. 21. Faculty and staff pay increases will occur, he added. Assistant Professor Maria Dixon received a special award during the meeting. Read a recap under the link.

(more…)

February 2, 2009|News|
Load More Posts