academic initiatives

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2014

Unknown1Pumpkins and Professors: SMU Dedman College of Humanities & Sciences presents Pumpkins and Professors Wednesday, Oct. 29, 4:30-6:30 p.m., in the Scholar’s Den of Clements Hall Basement. This is an opportunity for faculty and staff to come together outside the classroom for a spooky evening of coffee and conversation. Professors are welcome to bring their families and students are encouraged to bring their friends. For more information, contact Aubrey Richardson.

From Curanderos to Heart Surgeons and Back Again: Health, Healing and Resiliency in the Hispanic Southwest: In celebration of the SMU Department of Anthropology’s 50th anniversary, SMU distinguished alumni Robert T. Trotter will discuss the practice of curanderismoCuranderismo is part of a historically and culturally important health care system deeply rooted in native Mexican healing techniques. The lecture will take place Wednesday, Oct. 29, 5 p.m., in McCord Auditorium. To RSVP, please contact Pamela Hogan.

US Congressman Pete Sessions: SMU College Republicans presents US Congressman Pete Sessions Wednesday, Oct. 29, 6 p.m., in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. Sessions will speak to students about current events and issues. For more information, contact Cole Chandler.

Meadows Jazz Orchestra Brown Bag Concert: Meadows School of the Arts presents a lively noontime concert by Meadows Jazz Orchestra directed by Dylan Smith. The concert will take place Thursday, Oct. 30, 12:45 p.m., in the Tubman Atrium of the Owen Arts Center. For more information, contact Dylan Smith.

WNSoFF4XBig iDeas Pitch Contest: In search of the next big student innovation, SMU Big iDeas will host The Big iDeas Pitch Contest Friday, Oct. 31, 3-5 p.m., at the CUBE, 600 Expressway Tower. The contest is an open event for undergraduates with big ideas on how they can make a positive impact in the world. For more information, contact Big iDeas via email or phone 214.768.4788.

Visiting Artist Lecture Series: As part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series, Meadows School of the Arts presents Houston-based artist Jamal Cyrus. Focusing on African American identity through cultural and political movements, Cyrus’s work explores events such as the Jazz Age of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and their consequent appropriation by mainstream culture. The lecture will take place Monday, Nov. 3, 6:30 p.m., in the Owen Arts Center, B600. For additional information, call 214.768.1222.

Peace, Politics & Plutonium: The Hillel of Dallas and SMU Jewish Studies present a lunch and lecture with Gil Hoffman as he offers an insider’s look at mayhem in the Middle East. The event takes place Wednesday, Nov. 5, 11:55 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., in Heroy Hall, Room 153. To RSVP, please contact SMU Jewish Studies by Oct. 31.

Big iDeas looks for the next big student innovation at the 2014 Pitch Contest Friday, Oct. 31

Big-iDeasWant to see what SMU’s most innovative students are up to? Take a break from Halloween activities and stop by The Big iDeas Pitch Contest on Friday, Oct. 31, 3-5 p.m., at the CUBE, 600 Expressway Tower. 

The contest is an open event for undergraduates with big ideas on how they can make a positive impact in the world. After developing ideas in teams, students pitch their ideas to a panel of judges with backgrounds in innovation and entrepreneurship. Next, judges determine which ideas are “the big ones” based on what is realistic and can be developed in the next three months. The winning teams are eligible to win up to $1,000 to develop prototypes or pilots in preparation for Demo Day in late January 2015.

Click here for the Big iDeas Pitch Contest rules

Launched by SMU Provost Paul Ludden in 2008, Big iDeas inspires and empowers students to not only dream up big ideas, but to make them real. Past winners include:

  • WNSoFF4XFACT: Free Admissions Consulting Team, a non-profit that gives low-income students access to free, individualized mentoring and advice targeting every component of the college application process.
  • Oasis Express, a weekend shuttle service designed to give on-campus students easy access to local, fresh food from SMU to White Rock Lake Farmer’s Market.
  • Reading for a Reason, an annual on-campus read-a-thon that promotes literacy in young children.

For more information contact SMU Big iDeas via email or phone. 214-768-4788.

Sports Highlights: Sept. 24, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 2.27.36 PMWomen’s Soccer:  Mustang first-year Lauren Guerra was named the American Athletic Conference “Rookie of the Week.” Guerra scored both goals in the Mustangs 2-1 victory over Gonzaga this past Sunday. Guerra will take the field again in Houston on Thursday, Sept. 25 and return home to play BYU Saturday, Sept. 27, 7 p.m. More information on this weeks game, including live stats, is available here.

Men’s Soccer: After his performance in SMU’s 2-0 win over Oral Roberts, Benjamin Joseph was also named American Athletic Conference “Rookie of the Week.” Joseph scored the match winning shot and pushed the Mustangs to 3-3 on the 2014 season. Watch Joseph play as SMU hosts Tulsa Friday, Sept. 26, 7 p.m. at Wescott Field. More information on the match, including live stats, is available here.

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 2.44.50 PMWomen’s Volleyball: After extending their win streak to program-best 11 matches, Mustangs received votes in the AVCA Coaches Top 25 Poll for the third straight week after winning three matches at the SMU Doubletree Classic. Mustangs will begin American Athletic Conference against UCF on Friday, Sept. 26, 7 p.m. in Moody Coliseum.

Men’s Football: SMU will play its second straight home game against rival TCU on Saturday, Sept. 27 at 11 a.m. For more information, including live stats as the Mustangs battle the Horned Frogs for the Iron Skillet, click here.

Women’s Golf: Mustangs brought home the title from the 2014 East & West Match Play Challenge in Ann Arbor, Michigan this weekend. SMU Women’s Golf will head to the Schooner Fall Classic in Norman, Oklahoma. Hosted by Oklahoma, the event will take place at the Belmar Golf Course, Oct. 3-6.

$4 million in gifts will fund SMU Tower Scholars Program

SMU Tower Center logoGifts totaling more than $4 million will endow and provide operational support for the new Tower Scholars Program – a unique immersion experience for undergraduates in public policymaking through SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies.

A gift of $2 million, made possible by Highland Capital Management L.P., will endow the Highland Capital Management Endowed Tower Scholars Program Fund. The participating students will be recognized as Highland Capital Management Tower Scholars.

A gift of $1 million from the Hamon Charitable Foundation will endow the Jake L. Hamon Endowed Internship Program in the Tower Scholars Program Fund. A $1 million gift from The Berry R. Cox Family Foundation will support endowment and provide operational support.

The University has received additional donations totaling over $400,000 toward operation of the Tower Scholars Program fund – important to the implementation of the program until the endowments mature.

> The Dallas Morning NewsBob Miller: SMU’s Tower Scholars Program receives over $4 million in gifts

Ten sophomore students will be selected as Highland Capital Management Tower Scholars every year. Students may apply to the program during the fall term of their sophomore year; the first applications are being accepted in fall 2014. The first scholars will begin their studies in spring 2015 leading to a minor in Public Policy and International Affairs.

The scholars will be steeped in domestic and foreign affairs, national security and defense, and international political economy. Access to global and national leaders and policy makers, study abroad opportunities and meaningful senior-year internships are hallmarks of the program. The specialized curriculum includes instruction by professors-of-the-practice and visiting diplomats.

“Few American universities offer a program designed for undergraduates with as much real-world policy education and experience as does the Tower Scholars Program,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The gifts that make this program possible allow students to begin gaining professional perspectives while working toward their undergraduate degrees, bridging the usual gap between graduation and career development.”

“The Tower Center is a signature program within SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, and I’m delighted with the opportunity this presents for all of our SMU students,” said Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero. “The students who will graduate as Highland Capital Management Tower Scholars are destined for great things,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden.

The invitation-only Tower Scholars Program and associated minor is open for application from all majors across SMU’s schools, with admission based on a competitive process. The minor in Public Policy and International Affairs requires 15 hours of political science courses, beginning with Introduction to Global Policy Making in the spring of the sophomore year. The scholars will develop mentor relationships with public policy practitioners, work with clients on actual cases, and have access to local businesses, decision makers and Tower Center Board members.

The gifts to fund the Tower Scholars Program count toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised $874 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story from SMU News

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 3, 2014

Meadows School’s Faculty Artist and Distinguished Alumni Recital Series: International concert artists Alexander Kobrin and Emanuel Borok present the first of three concerts devoted to the complete collection of Beethoven’s 10 sonatas for violin and piano Saturday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m. The performance will take place in Caruth Auditorium and costs $7 for students, faculty and staff. For more information call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Larry Palmer, Professor of Harpsichord and Organ.

Larry Palmer, SMU Professor of Harpsichord and Organ.

Faculty Recital featuring Larry Palmer: For his 45th annual faculty recital, SMU Professor of Harpsichord and Organ Larry Palmer will play organ works by Saint-Saens, Bach, De Gringy, Calvin Hampton, Wilbur Held and Thomas Hewitt-Jones. Also featured will be harpsichord works by Rameau, Bussoni, Hessenberg, Fredrico Mompou and Domenico Scarlatti. The performance is free and open to the public and will take place in Caruth Auditorium, Monday, Sept. 8, at 8 p.m.

After al Qaeda: The Future of American Grand Strategy: Join two of the country’s most respected strategic thinkers, Hal Brands and Barry R. Posen, for a provocative discussion regarding the American grand strategy for maintaining national security. The event will take place in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, Thursday, Sept. 11, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Please RSVP to tower@smu.edu if you are interested in attending or have any additional questions.

SMU’s 2014 Engaged Learning Expo connects students with opportunities on Wednesday, Aug. 27

SMU Engaged Learning group photo, 2014-15Community agencies and campus organizations are looking for highly motivated SMU students who want to learn outside the classroom, tackle real world issues and explore potential careers. They’ll have an ideal opportunity to get to know each other at the 2014 Engaged Learning Expo.

This year’s Expo takes place 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, in the Miller Event Center, Moody Coliseum.

Read about 2014-15 Engaged Learning student projects

The event is a valuable networking opportunity for faculty members who want to develop courses with community components, as well as staff members who want to expand their programs, says Susan Kress, director of Engaged Learning.

The following campus programs and community partners have confirmed their attendance at the 2014 Expo:

Campus programs

  • Big iDeas
  • Budd Center: Involving Communities in Education
  • Caswell Undergraduate Leadership Fellows Program
  • Center for Global Health Impact
  • Clinton Global Initiative University
  • Community Engagement and Leadership
  • Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute
  • Embrey Human Rights Program
  • Hamilton Scholars
  • Hunt Institute for Engineering and Humanity
  • Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility
  • McNair Scholars
  • TEDxSMU – Young Fellows
  • Tower Center for Political Studies
  • Undergraduate Research

Community partners

  • Brother Bill’s Helping Hand
  • Buckner International
  • Dallas Holocaust Museum
  • Group Excellence
  • Interfaith Housing Coalition
  • Kids-U
  • Nexus Recovery Center
  • Reading Partners
  • Texas Discovery Gardens
  • Trinity River Audubon Center
  • Unite/Initiative
  • United Way Dallas
  • Uplift Education
  • Workers Defense Project

More about events and exhibits scheduled for the Expo

The Expo also celebrates 69 undergraduate Engaged Learning Fellows who are working on significant projects this academic year, and will provide opportunities to mix and match interested students with campus programs as well as DFW-area community partners.

Visit SMU’s Office of Engaged Learning online

‘Big data’ demands are focus of new SMU Cox Master’s degree

SMU Cox School of BusinessApplications are now being accepted for a new SMU Master’s program designed to help fill a growing marketplace demand created by “big data.” The Cox School of Business will offer the first classes in its new Master of Science in Business Analytics (M.S.B.A.) in Fall 2014.

The one-year graduate degree in business analytics will help students hone skills in business process analytics and/or customer analytics, depending on which area they choose to specialize.

Students have the option of two program specializations or tracks. One focuses more attention on data base concepts and applications (business process analytics). The other focuses more attention on marketing research practices and consumer-centric analytics (customer analytics).

The degree is a 33-credit-hour, two-term (four modules) program. The first graduates will complete the program in May 2015. No full-time work experience is required for admission.

“‛Big Data’ continue to have an impact on how organizations conduct business as a whole and in the skill sets that employees are expected to have in order to be productive,” said Hettie Tabor, director of the new program. “By investing in one additional year of education, SMU Cox M.S.B.A. students will meet that demand with the knowledge and skills that will allow them to launch a successful career in IT, marketing, operations and consulting fields.”

Potential candidates for the new degree program include B.B.A. and non-business students who are working toward degrees in economics, math, engineering and science; or graduates who have completed such degrees.

Tabor, a managing director at Accenture, has worked in IT for 25 years, with more than 19 years of practical experience in analytics and SAP. Tabor built and served as the Accenture SAP Business Analytics Global Practice Lead for 15 years and has a wealth of technical and project management knowledge in the analytics, business intelligence, in memory computing, data mining, predictive analytics, business planning and consolidations, and data management space.

For more information, contact Hettie Tabor.

 

J Term program adds SMU-in-Taos for 2014

After the unprecedented success of the 2013 J Term at SMU-in-Plano, the program is expanding to SMU-in-Taos for 2014. Set for Jan. 6-15, J Term offers more than 50 courses at a reduced tuition rate.

Students can complete one three-credit-hour course in eight concentrated days at SMU-in-Plano or SMU-in-Taos. The initial deadline for J Term applications is Friday, Nov. 22.

The J Term (short for January Term) allows students to complete one three-credit-hour course at a discounted tuition rate before the start of the spring semester. For J Term 2014, regular undergraduate students will pay a reduced tuition rate of $1,154 per credit hour ($3,462 per course). Payment is due by Thursday, Dec. 19. Parking is free on the SMU-in-Plano campus, and no decal is required.

Watch a new video about J Term from SMU News’ Myles Taylor

J Term Director Kate Livingston says the program allows students to use the time between the fall and spring terms to focus on a course of interest or stay on track for graduation. Students also can fulfill General Education or University Curriculum requirements.

This year’s offerings include courses from the Cox School of Business, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Lyle School of Engineering, Meadows School of the Arts and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

J Term courses are not initially available for registration through Access.SMU. To enroll, students should meet with an adviser to select appropriate courses and then submit the online J Term application form before the deadline. After the Thanksgiving holiday, students will be notified of their final J Term course selection and given permission to officially enroll in Access.SMU.

Students participating in J Term at SMU-in-Plano will be responsible for their own housing; discounted hotel rooms are available at the Marriott TownPlace Suites, about a mile from the SMU-in-Plano campus. Shuttle service is also available. Information about housing at SMU-in-Taos during J Term is available here.

For more information, e-mail jterm@smu.edu or call 214-768-3657.

> Learn more from the J Term homepage at smu.edu/jterm

Gerald J. Ford gives $15 million for new SMU research center

Confetti streamers fly at the announcement of Gerald J. Ford’s $15 million gift to establish a new research center at SMU. Ford’s new commitment brings to $800 million the total raised to date by the University’s Second Century Campaign.

Business leader and banker Gerald J. Ford has committed a $15 million lead gift for a campus research center that will help expand advanced computing and interdisciplinary research throughout the University.

The new state-of-the-art building will support research facilitated by SMU’s high-performance computing capabilities, among other projects. It also will be the home of the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute, established in May 2012 through a gift from the Dedman family and Foundation. The building will be located on SMU’s main campus at the corner of McFarlin Boulevard and Airline Road.

The Gerald J. Ford Research Center joins other advancements SMU is implementing to support its accelerated research push. Among them is completion of a new University data center in a companion building under construction on SMU property south of Mockingbird Lane. Technology in the new building will enable SMU’s high-performance computing capacity to grow from 2,000 to more than 10,000 CPU’s.

“The new Gerald J. Ford Research Center will help to transform the research and educational landscape of the University,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Students must be prepared for a world in which data analyses, modeling and visualization are critical decision-making tools, while faculty continue to push the boundaries of knowledge and innovation. Gerald Ford’s new gift continues his tradition of strong support for faculty research. We are extremely grateful to him for this major boost to SMU’s academic aspirations and impact.”

In 2003 Ford established the Gerald J. Ford Research Fellows program at SMU, which annually honors outstanding faculty members with funding to support their research and creative endeavors. To date 48 professors have been named Ford Research Fellows.

“I believe it is important that SMU alumni and friends support all areas of the University – academic programs, scholarships, athletics and campus development,” Ford said. “SMU is known for the breadth of the educational experience it provides, and this campaign is strengthening every critical component of the campus environment for our students.”

The surprise announcement of Ford’s new commitment was made Friday, Oct. 25 at a meeting of leaders and volunteers for SMU’s Second Century Campaign. The Volunteer Summit attracted more than 200 participants and coincided with the University’s Homecoming Week.

Ford’s new commitment brings to $800 million the total raised to date by SMU’s Second Century Campaign. The University announced in September that it was raising its original monetary goal from $750 million to $1 billion, based on the campaign’s rapid progress ahead of schedule. Seeking resources for scholarships, faculty positions, academic programs, facilities and the campus experience, the campaign was publicly launched in 2008.

Based on continuing campaign momentum and expansion of the goal to $1 billion, SMU has adopted ambitious new goals to:

  • Increase the number of endowed scholarships to 500 by the end of the campaign, December 31, 2015.
  • Increase the number of endowed faculty positions to 110, up from the original goal of 100. To date 96 such positions have been established, 34 through The Second Century Campaign.
  • Complete funding for 10 major capital projects, beyond the five already completed since the start of the campaign, for a total of 15.

> Read more about the Ford Research Center from SMU News

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

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