academic ceremonies

Calendar Highlights: April 8, 2015

 “For My People: A New Musical Work” featuring Randy Klein (piano) and Aurelia Williams

“For My People: A New Musical Work” featuring Randy Klein (piano) and Aurelia Williams

Margaret Walker Alexander Tribute: Celebrating the centennial of the birth of acclaimed African American poet-scholar-activist Margaret Walker Alexander (1915-1998), SMU sponsors a free performance of “For My People: A New Musical Work”  on Wednesday, April 8. Featuring the opus’ author, Randy Klein, joined by Aurelia Williams and the Heart and Soul Singers, the performance marks SMU’s first sponsorship of the annual College Language Association (CLA) convention (April 8-11 in Dallas).The musical tribute will take place at 7 p.m., at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, Clarence Muse Café Theater, 1309 Canton Street. 

Seeking the Promised Land: Mormons’ Place in a Changing Religious Landscape: Sponsored by the “Religious and American Public Life” Fellows Seminar, SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities & Science hosts David E. Campbell as he leads the lecture on “Seeking the Promised Land: Mormons’ Place in a Changing Religious Landscape.” A Professor of Political Science from University of Notre Dame, Campbell will discuss Mormons’ place in a changing religious landscape. The lecture will take place on Wednesday, April 8, at 6 p.m. in 147 Caruth Hall.

Relay for Life: The 2015 Relay For Life of SMU will take place Friday-Saturday, April 10-11, from 6:30 p.m.-11:30 a.m. Students, teachers and faculty are encouraged to participate in the event to make progress toward a world without cancer. For more information, visit the SMU 2015 Relay for Life event webpage. 

Honors Day Convocation: SMU’s 18th Annual Honors Convocation will take place Monday, April 13, at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. SMU community members are invited to celebrate the academic excellence achieved by SMU students. For questions regarding Honors Day Convocation, email the SMU Ceremonies department. 

SAS@SMU “The New Middle East Cold War:” The Security and Strategy Program at the SMU Tower Center hosts F. Gregory Gause, III and Ambassador Robert Jordan as they present a lecture on “The New Middle East Cold War” on Tuesday, April 14, at noon in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. While this event is free and open to the public, guests are asked to please RSVP via email to the Tower Center. 

Tower Center Monthly Seminar: Continuing their monthly seminar series, the SMU Tower Center presents Kate Carté Engel in a lecture entitled “The Geopolitics of Religion: Mapping Early Modern Protestant Networks in the Digital Age” on Wednesday, April 15, 1 p.m. in the Tower Center Board Room, Room 227, Carr Collins Hall. Engel is an associate professor of religious studies specializing in early American and Atlantic religion. While this event is free and open to the public, guests are asked to please RSVP via email to the Tower Center.

Save the date: SMU Honors Day 2015 is Monday, April 13

SMU Honors Convocation 2013 procession

Honors Convocation 2013. Photo credit: SMU/Kim Ritzenthaler

SMU celebrates high achievement in academics and community life during Honors Day 2015 on Monday, April 13. The 18th Honors Convocation begins at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium, and the 2015 Awards Extravaganza takes place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

SMU reserves one Monday each April to celebrate the achievements of students, faculty, staff members, trustees and administrators in the two ceremonies. The Honors Convocation recognizes academic achievement at the University and department levels.

SMU’s 2015 Honors Convocation award and honors recipients

Brian W. Stump, Albritton Professor of Geological Sciences and AAAS Fellow, SMU

Brian Stump, SMU’s Claude C. Albritton Jr. Chair in Geological Sciences

Brian Stump, Claude C. Albritton Jr. Chair in Earth Sciences in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, will be the convocation speaker. An expert in seismic wave propagation and earthquake source theory, Stump has become well known in North Texas for his continuing research on the increasing occurrences of small earthquakes that have shaken the area since 2008.

But his work in detecting ground motion from explosions has for more than 20 years helped the United States government in ensuring that the world’s nuclear powers abide by their agreements related to underground nuclear testing. He served as scientific adviser to the U.S. delegation to the Conference on Disarmament from 1994 through 1996 and continues to be called upon frequently to assist the U.S. government in the interpretation of seismic and acoustic data.

In November 2014, Stump was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to his field, particularly in the area of seismic monitoring in support of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. He is the fifth SMU professor to receive this honor.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch SMU’s Honors Convocation via live streaming Monday, April 13 at smu.edu/live

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2015 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Find more information on Honors Convocation: smu.edu/honorsday
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

SMU to honor three global leaders with honorary degrees during its 100th Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, 2015

SMU has chosen three extraordinary women to receive honorary degrees at its 100th Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, 2015.

The honorees are Meave Leakey, standard-bearer of a family of anthropologists whose research in Africa has revealed important clues to humans’ earliest ancestors; Irene Hirano Inouye, who helped build the Japanese American National Museum and is the founding president of the U.S.-Japan Council; and Helen LaKelly Hunt, a donor-activist, author and SMU alumna whose life focus has been to empower women and educate people about the value of healthy, intimate relationships. All three will receive from SMU the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa.

Information about symposia presented by the honorary degree recipients will be released at a later date.

“One of the great privileges for SMU is conferring honorary degrees upon recipients who have excelled in their fields and contributed to society in diverse ways,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “They show our students how to change the world through education, service and philanthropy – and also illustrate the value of lives well-lived.”

> The history of honorary degrees at SMU, including honorees by name, year and degree

Meave LeakeyMEAVE LEAKEY has established herself as one of the most visible and distinguished scientists in a highly competitive profession through her field and laboratory research in paleoanthropology. Her research interests focus on East African mammalian evolution over the past 30 million years, with emphasis on primate and human evolution. Together with colleagues, Leakey has described new species of early apes, monkeys and human ancestors, including Australopithecus anamensis, the earliest known australopithecine (an extinct genus of early African hominids), and Kenyanthropus platyops (also extinct, the species name means “flat-faced man of Kenya”). These findings provide evidence of diversity in the human fossil record 3.5 million years ago.

Having retired as head of the Department of Palaeontology at the National Museums of Kenya, Leakey is now a research associate in the museum’s Palaeontology Division. She also is a research professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Stony Brook, New York, and director of Plio-Pleistocene research at the Turkana Basin Institute, Nairobi. In 2002, she was named a National Geographic “Explorer-in-Residence” in honor of the 50-year relationship between the National Geographic Society and the Leakey family.

Leakey is author of numerous groundbreaking scientific publications in prestigious journals and the author of several monographs documenting her research in Turkana. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including two honorary degrees from Stony Brook University and the University College of London, and was a recipient of the Academy of Achievement Award in 2004. In 2011 she was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society of London. In 2013 she was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., as a Foreign Associate, and the same year she became a Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences.

Leakey received a B.S. in zoology and marine zoology from the University of North Wales in 1965 and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of North Wales in 1968.

Irene Hirano Inouye IRENE HIRANO INOUYE became the executive director of T.H.E. (To Help Everyone) Clinic in Los Angeles at the age of 27. Founded by medical volunteers, T.H.E. aspired to bring affordable healthcare to poor and uninsured women. In 1988, she was appointed president and CEO of the Japanese-American National Museum (JANM), which opened in 1992. She would develop it as one of the preeminent resources in America on the immigrant experience. Its high-profile exhibitions, community connections, research projects and eventual affiliation with the Smithsonian have helped the museum build a reputation for excellence while encouraging young people to acknowledge and connect with their Japanese-American heritage. Inouye has played a foundational role in getting the World War II Japanese internment camp experience into history textbooks, and in gaining public attention for exceptional Japanese-Americans.

Inouye became the founding president of the U.S.-Japan Council (USJC) in 2008, the same year she married U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. The USJC builds upon her work at the Japanese American National Museum and seeks to create networks of Japanese-Americans at the top levels of business, government, education, and the non-profit sector. After the 2011 tsunami in Japan, she became the guiding force in the Tomodachi Initiative, which supports Japan’s recovery from the disaster as a joint project of the USJC and the American embassy in Tokyo.

Inouye currently serves as chair of the board of the Ford Foundation, and she previously chaired the board of the Kresge Foundation. She also serves on the executive boards of Independent Sector, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Smithsonian Institution, the American Association of Museums, and the President’s Committee.

Inouye earned two degrees in Public Administration from USC: her B.S. in 1970 and her M.P.A. in 1972.

Helen LaKelly Hunt HELEN LaKELLY HUNT is a donor-activist, author and SMU alumna who has been recognized for both her work for healthy marriages and family and her efforts in helping to build the global women’s funding movement. She is the founder of The Sister Fund, a private foundation that supports women’s social, political, economic and spiritual empowerment. Hunt has helped establish several other organizations, including Dallas Women’s Foundation, New York Women’s Foundation, Women’s Funding Network and Women Moving Millions.

Her books include Faith and Feminism: A Holy Alliance, as well as seven books on intimate relationships and parenting co-authored with her husband, Harville HendrixTheir joint publications have sold more than two million copies and have been translated into more than 50 languages. With Hendrix, Hunt helped to develop Imago Relationships International, a nonprofit organization formed as a guide for transforming relationships and building better marriages. Imago Therapy is practiced by more than 1,900 therapists in more than 20 countries. Over the last two years, they have been disseminating in South Dallas and West Dallas “Safe Conversations” skills through a program called Family Wellness Dallas!

In recognition of her leadership in the women’s funding movement, Hunt has received Gloria Steinem’s Women of Vision Award from the Ms. Foundation for Women, the Equity Leadership Award from Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW), the National Creative Philanthropy Award from the National Network of Women’s Funds, and the Laura Parsons Pratt Award for Outstanding Achievement on Behalf of Women and Children from the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies. In addition, Hunt has been an Honoree of the Center for the Elimination of Violence in the Family and has been inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

Hunt received three degrees from SMU: a B.A. in Secondary Education in 1971, an M.L.A. in 1976 and an M.A in Counseling in 1979. Hunt earned a Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary in 2004, her focus of study being the religious foundations of American Feminism.

> Learn more about SMU’s Commencement ceremonies, events and traditions at smu.edu/commencement

Former President George W. Bush will deliver address at SMU’s 2015 Commencement Saturday, May 16

George W BushGeorge W. Bush, the 43rd president of the United States, will deliver the address at SMU’s Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, in Moody Coliseum on the main campus.

“This Commencement is especially noteworthy because 2015 is the 100-year anniversary of SMU’s opening. So it is fitting that we should hear from a president who led our nation and the world during historic times and is a valued member of the campus community,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner.

SMU expects to award more than 2,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees in the University-wide ceremony.

This is the first time that an SMU Commencement speaker has returned for a second presentation. Mr. Bush’s first Commencement speech at SMU was in 1999, when he was governor of Texas.

George W. Bush has been a long-time member of the SMU family through his marriage to Laura, an SMU alumna, who is currently a member of the SMU Board of Trustees. However, since his 2007 decision to locate his Presidential Center at SMU, he has become an active member of the University community, attending events and visiting classes.

“The Presidential Center and SMU are enjoying numerous partnerships through joint programming and faculty research as well as internships for SMU students,” Turner said. “Through the Center, more than 700,000 people have visited SMU, most of whom never before would have come to our campus. We are grateful for the resources and benefits of the Presidential Center and President Bush’s participation as Commencement speaker during this special time.”

George W. Bush received his bachelor’s degree in history from Yale University and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School. After a successful career in business, including as an owner of the Texas Rangers, he was elected governor of Texas in 1994. When he was re-elected in November 1998, he became the first governor in Texas history to be elected to consecutive four-year terms. He is the author of two New York Times number one bestsellers, Decision Points and 41: A Portrait of my Father.

Following the University-wide Commencement, SMU’s schools and departments will hold individual ceremonies throughout the day to present degrees and honor graduates.

Written by Patricia Ann LaSalle

> Read more from SMU News

Calendar Highlights, Feb. 4, 2015

Photograph taken at SMU Meadows Susannah recital

Photograph taken at SMU Meadows Opera Theatre rehearsal for upcoming production Susannah.

Meadows Opera Theatre: The award-winning Meadows Opera Theatre, directed by Hank Hammett, presents the two-act opera SusannahTickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff and are available for purchase online. The production will run from Thursday, Feb. 5 through Sunday, Feb. 8, in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center. For more information, call 214-768-2787.

Clements Center Senior Fellow Lecture: Lead by Clements Center Research Senior Fellow Rachel St. John, the Annual Clements Center Senior Fellow Lecture will explore “Unmanifest America: The Unstable Borders of 19th-Century North America & the Strange Career of William Gwin.St. John will present her research on William Gwin, the once prominent speculator and politician who attempted to expand the boundaries of the Untied States during the 19th century. The lecture will begin at 6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 5, in McCord Auditorium. Although this event is free and open to the public, seating is limited and guests are encouraged to register online. For more information, call 214-768-3684.

Faith Colloquium: The Bolin Family 2015 Public Life|Personal Faith Colloquium presents former While House Chief of Staff Andrew and his wife, the Rev. Kathleen Card. Sponsored by the SMU Perkins School of Theoogy, the event will take place on Friday, Feb. 6. The informal Q&A-style Colloquium, free and open to the public, will be from 10-11 a.m. in the Great Hall of Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, 5901 Bishop Boulevard. For more information, visit Perkin’s Public Life|Personal Faith webpage. 

Meadows Museum Symposium: Co-organized by the Meadows Museum and Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, the Meadows Museum Symposium presents “Curating Goya,” Saturday, Feb. 7, 10 a.m., in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum.  Curators of recent and upcoming shows on Francisco Goya will discuss how different approaches to exhibiting Goya’s work invite new paths for understanding his art. While this is a free event with no registration required, seating will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, call 214-768-4677.

Marine

“The President’s Own” United States Marine Band Brass Quintet.

U.S. Marine Band Brass Quintet: Presented by the Meadows School of the Arts“The President’s Own” United States Marine Band Brass Quintet from Washington D.C., will give a free concert at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 10 in Caruth Auditorium. As America’s oldest continuously active professional musical organization, the quintet’s mission is to perform for the president of the United States and the commandant of the Marine Corps. For more information, call the Meadows School Division of Music at 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 28, 2015

engaged-learning-logoBig iDeas Demo Day: SMU Engaged Learning concludes Engaged Learning Week with Big iDeas Demo Day on Friday, Jan. 30, 12-5 p.m., in The CUBE, 600 Expressway Tower, East Campus. A free buffet lunch and the Big iDeas Pitch Competition Winners Fair will begin at noon. Next, the Big iDeas Pitch Competition Winners will compete to receive up to $5,000 in project funding in the Business Plan Competition starting at 2 p.m.  For more information, visit the Engaged Learning webpage or email Susan Kress.

BP DEMO DAY TILECampus Kids’ Day: Following their match versus Sam Houston State at the SMU Tennis Complex, the SMU Women’s Tennis Team will host a free Campus Kids’ Day Clinic on Friday, Jan. 30. Started by the United States Tennis Association (USTA), Campus Kids’ Day Clinics expose current and aspiring junior players to college tennis. The match begins at 3 p.m. with the clinic following at approximately 5 p.m. The clinic will be open to kids of all ages. To register for the free clinic, email SMU Women’s Tennis Head Coach Kati Gyulai.

Meadows Community Series:  SMU Meadows School of the Arts presents six community concerts and events as part of its “Meadows Community Series.” Designed to bring Meadows performances into the community, the Meadows Wind Ensemble will start the spring series at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 30 in Dallas City Performance HallThe series also features concerts by the SYZYGY new music ensemble, Meadows choirs, Meadows Opera Theatre and Meadows Symphony Orchestra, as well as a dance performance and children’s creative movement class at Klyde Warren Park. For additional information and a full schedule of the series, visit the Meadows Community Series webpage.  

Faculty Piano Recital: As part of their faculty performance series, SMU Meadows School of the Arts presents Catharine Lysinger. Lysinger is a senior lecturer and artistic director of the Meadows Piano Preparatory Department. The performance is free, and will take place Saturday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m., in Caruth Auditorium. For more information, call 214.768.2787.

ignitelogofinalThe Crain All-University Leadership Conference: Seeking to “ignite” leadership within the SMU community, the 2015 Crain All-University Leadership Conference will take place Feb. 6-7, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. This year’s conference will feature keynote speakers Chad Morris, SMU’s new Head Football Coach, and Shanterra McBride, SMU Alumna and founder of Preparing Leaders of Today. For additional information, visit the conference webpage.

Calendar Highlights: The Spring 2015 term at a glance

Dallas Hall steps from a 3rd-story windowWelcome back! SMU’s 2015 Spring Term begins Friday, Jan. 16 – a few important dates at a glance:

  • Friday, Jan. 16: First day of classes for the 2015 Spring Term
  • Monday, Jan. 19: Martin Luther King Day (University closed). SMU celebrates MLK Day of Service 8 a.m.-1 p.m. – learn more at smu.edu/volunteer
  • Wednesday, Jan. 21: Spring 2015 General Faculty Meeting
  • Monday-Sunday, March 9-15: Spring Break
  • Friday, April 3: Good Friday (University closed)
  • Monday, April 13: Honors Convocation and Awards Extravaganza
  • Friday, April 17: Founders’ Day
  • Monday, May 4: Last day of classes for Spring 2015
  • Tuesday, May 5: Reading Day
  • Wednesday-Tuesday, May 6-12: Final examinations (no exams scheduled on Sunday)
  • Friday, May 15: Baccalaureate
  • Saturday, May 16: All-University Commencement and school/department diploma ceremonies

SMU kicks off the 2014 holiday season with Celebration of Lights Monday, Dec. 1

celebration-of-lights-01-135x100ratioWith Christmas coming soon, SMU kicks off the holiday season with a number of campus events. From annual traditions to commencement ceremonies, the University offers many opportunities to celebrate the spirit of the season.

  • Celebration of Lights: Following Thanksgiving Break, SMU kicks off the winter holiday season with the 2014 Celebration of Lights Monday, Dec. 1, 7 p.m., on the Main Quad. Lighting the University Christmas Tree and the Main Quad, the University community will gather together to sing seasonal songs, enjoy live performers and hear the Christmas story ready by SMU President R. Gerald Turner.
  • Christmas Worship Service: SMU’s Perkins School of Theology celebrates its Christmas Worship Service Thursday, Dec. 4, at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. in Perkins Chapel. Under the theme “…waiting…hoping…”, Diva Dolce from Meadows School of the Arts and the Chancel Choir from Advent Lutheran Church directed by Peyton Strouth ’08 join Stefan Engels, professor of organ and Meadows’ Leah Fullinwider Centennial Chair in Music Performance, and the 40-voice Seminary Singers for a special performance. Next, Perkins Dean William Lawrence will preside with narration prepared by Professor of Christian Worship Mark Stamm. This service will honor composer and former instructor Jane M. Marshall on the occasion of her 90th birthday. For more information, email Professor C. Michael Hawn.

Political and social analyst David Brooks delivers Tate Lecture, Nov. 11, 2014

150452TateLectureBrooks

SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series presents political and social analyst David Brooks Tuesday, Nov. 11. 

Brooks will offer his insight and opinion on current events to continue the 33rd season of Tate Lectures. Brooks will give The Omni Hotels Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Through his humor, insight and passion, Brooks has a gift for brining audiences face-to-face with the spirit of the times. He is a detailed observer of the American way of life and a perceptive analyst of present-day politics and foreign affairs.

He holds several prestigious positions as commentator:

The_Social_Animal_(David_Brooks_book)Brooks’ current book, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character and Achievement, tells the story of a fictional American couple to explain the importance of neuroscience and sociology in understanding America’s politics, culture and the future. His previous books, Bobos in Paradise and On Paradise Drive are in a style he calls “comic sociology” – providing descriptions of how we live and “the water we swim in.” All three novels are as witty and entertaining, as they are revealing and insightful.

All SMU students, faculty and staff are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum segment at 5 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., and seats may be reserved online.

The evening lecture is sold out. However, SMU students can got to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-serve basis.

> Learn more about the 33rd Tate Lecture Series

> For additional information, contact the SMU Tate Series

 

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2014

Unknown1Pumpkins and Professors: SMU Dedman College of Humanities & Sciences presents Pumpkins and Professors Wednesday, Oct. 29, 4:30-6:30 p.m., in the Scholar’s Den of Clements Hall Basement. This is an opportunity for faculty and staff to come together outside the classroom for a spooky evening of coffee and conversation. Professors are welcome to bring their families and students are encouraged to bring their friends. For more information, contact Aubrey Richardson.

From Curanderos to Heart Surgeons and Back Again: Health, Healing and Resiliency in the Hispanic Southwest: In celebration of the SMU Department of Anthropology’s 50th anniversary, SMU distinguished alumni Robert T. Trotter will discuss the practice of curanderismoCuranderismo is part of a historically and culturally important health care system deeply rooted in native Mexican healing techniques. The lecture will take place Wednesday, Oct. 29, 5 p.m., in McCord Auditorium. To RSVP, please contact Pamela Hogan.

US Congressman Pete Sessions: SMU College Republicans presents US Congressman Pete Sessions Wednesday, Oct. 29, 6 p.m., in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. Sessions will speak to students about current events and issues. For more information, contact Cole Chandler.

Meadows Jazz Orchestra Brown Bag Concert: Meadows School of the Arts presents a lively noontime concert by Meadows Jazz Orchestra directed by Dylan Smith. The concert will take place Thursday, Oct. 30, 12:45 p.m., in the Tubman Atrium of the Owen Arts Center. For more information, contact Dylan Smith.

WNSoFF4XBig iDeas Pitch Contest: In search of the next big student innovation, SMU Big iDeas will host The Big iDeas Pitch Contest Friday, Oct. 31, 3-5 p.m., at the CUBE, 600 Expressway Tower. The contest is an open event for undergraduates with big ideas on how they can make a positive impact in the world. For more information, contact Big iDeas via email or phone 214.768.4788.

Visiting Artist Lecture Series: As part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series, Meadows School of the Arts presents Houston-based artist Jamal Cyrus. Focusing on African American identity through cultural and political movements, Cyrus’s work explores events such as the Jazz Age of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and their consequent appropriation by mainstream culture. The lecture will take place Monday, Nov. 3, 6:30 p.m., in the Owen Arts Center, B600. For additional information, call 214.768.1222.

Peace, Politics & Plutonium: The Hillel of Dallas and SMU Jewish Studies present a lunch and lecture with Gil Hoffman as he offers an insider’s look at mayhem in the Middle East. The event takes place Wednesday, Nov. 5, 11:55 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., in Heroy Hall, Room 153. To RSVP, please contact SMU Jewish Studies by Oct. 31.

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