Calendar Highlights: Back to school in brief, Fall 2017

Dallas Hall steps from a 3rd-story window

As the 2017-18 academic year gets rolling, here are a few Fall 2017 dates to remember:

  • Labor Day: Monday, Sept. 4 (University offices closed, no classes)
  • First Faculty Senate Meeting of 2017-18: Wednesday, Sept. 6
  • Family Weekend: Friday-Sunday, Sept. 22-24
  • Fall Break: Monday-Tuesday, Oct. 9-10
  • Homecoming Weekend: Friday-Saturday, Nov. 3-4
  • Thanksgiving: Thursday-Friday, Nov. 23-24 (University offices closed, no classes on Wednesday, Nov. 23)
  • Last day of classes: Monday, Dec. 4
  • Reading days: Tuesday-Wednesday, Dec. 5-6
  • Final exams: Thursday-Wednesday, Dec. 7-13 (no exams scheduled for Sunday)
  • December Commencement Convocation: Saturday, Dec. 16 (official close of term and date for conferral of degrees)
  • Christmas/Winter Break: Monday, Dec. 25, 2017-Monday, Jan. 1, 2018 (University offices closed)

Visit the SMU calendar to keep an eye on upcoming events.

By | 2017-08-31T10:43:19+00:00 August 29, 2017|Categories: Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU Football salutes soldiers, veterans in 2017 home opener Saturday, Sept. 2

Camo PerunaSMU will offer a tribute to all active military members and veterans at the 2017 football home opener versus Stephen F. Austin on Saturday, Sept. 2.

With the assistance of the George W. Bush Institute, “Salute To Our Heroes” is designed to “bring awareness to the issues that veterans face while in transition to civilian life,” according to a statement from SMU Athletics. With the help of on-campus veterans group SMU MilVets, the Athletics Department will honor SMU student veterans throughout the game.

In 2017, for the first time, fans can purchase and donate a seven-game season ticket for $99 through the Seats For Soldiers program. SMU Athletics will match your gift, donating a second set of season tickets to support and honor current military members, retired military personnel, and veterans. All Seats For Soldiers tickets purchased will be provided to active-duty and military veterans and their dependents throughout the 2017 season.

In addition, fans can enjoy a free pregame concert in Doak Walker Plaza starting at 4:30 p.m. featuring Texas country artist Zach Coffey. Coffey’s first single, “I Love You Anyway,” reached No. 8 on the Texas music chart, and he has opened for artists such as Pat Green, Casey Donahew and Jason Boland, among others.

Pregame activities will include a color guard for the presentation of arms, while halftime entertainment will include a tribute performance by the SMU Mustang Band.

The first 5,000 fans to enter Ford Stadium will receive “Salute To Our Heroes” branded thunder sticks.

Take part in the Seats For Soldiers program at this Ticketmaster link, or call the SMU Athletics Ticket Office at 214-SMU-GAME (768-4263).

By | 2017-08-24T14:42:54+00:00 August 24, 2017|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , |

Tune In: Welcoming new SMU students during Move-in Day 2017

SMU welcomed new students to campus last week, and SMU News was there to capture it. Watch as students, parents, and alumni joined University faculty and staff members to help the Class of 2021 settle into their residence halls during Move-in Day 2017.

Click the YouTube screen to watch, or click here to watch “Move-in Day 2017” in a new windowvideo

By | 2017-08-24T13:43:54+00:00 August 24, 2017|Categories: Tune In|Tags: , , , , , |

Research: New detector for neutrino research represents next frontier in particle physics

 

SMU is one of more than 100 institutions from around the world building hardware for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) – a massive international experiment that could change our understanding of the universe.

Construction for the particle detector will take years and scientists expect to begin taking data in the middle of the next decade, said SMU physicist Thomas E. Coan, a professor in the SMU Department of Physics and a researcher on the experiment. The groundbreaking ceremony was held Friday, July 21, 2017 at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

The LBNF will house the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Called DUNE for short, it will be built and operated by a group of roughly 1,000 scientists and engineers from 30 countries, including Coan.

When complete, LBNF/DUNE will be the largest experiment ever built in the United States to study the properties of the mysterious particles, which could help explain more about how the universe works and why matter exists at all.

“DUNE is designed to investigate a broad swath of the properties of neutrinos, one of the universe’s most abundant but still mysterious electrically neutral particles,” Coan said.

The experiment seeks to understand strange phenomena like neutrinos changing identities — called “oscillation” — in mid-flight and the behavioral differences between a neutrino an its anti-neutrino sibling, Coan said.

“A crisp understanding of neutrinos holds promise for understanding why any matter survived annihilation with antimatter from the Big Bang to form the people, planets and stars we see today,” Coan said. “DUNE is also able to probe whether or not the humble proton, found in all atoms of the universe, is actually unstable and ultimately destined to eventually decay away. It even has sensitivity to undertanding how stars explode into supernovae by studying the neutrinos that stream out from them during the explosion.”

— Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

SMU Woman’s Club plans reception with President and Mrs. Turner Sept. 20, 2017

SMU Woman's Club logo

The SMU Woman’s Club invites current and prospective members to its first event of the 2017-18 academic year on Wednesday, Sept. 20.

President R. Gerald Turner and Gail O. Turner will host a wine-and-cheese reception at their home from 5-6:30 p.m., where President Turner will provide a state-of-the-University update.

Founded in 1915, the SMU Woman’s Club currently has more than 100 members and coordinates several cultural, social and philanthropic events throughout the academic year. The club is open to all faculty and staff members, as well as wives of faculty and staff members.

For more information on membership requirements, contact Renee Moore Hart ’07, ’17.

> Learn more at the SMU Woman’s Club Facebook group

By | 2017-08-24T16:26:51+00:00 August 24, 2017|Categories: Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|Tags: , , |

Tune In: Watch SMU’s 103rd Opening Convocation live, Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017

President R. Gerald Turner will deliver the opening address, “World Changers Shaped Here,” at SMU’s 103rd Opening Convocation. The ceremony beings at 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017 in McFarlin Auditorium.

SMU Board of Trustees Chair Michael M. Boone ’63, ’67 , Faculty Senate President Paul Krueger and Student Body President David Shirzad will also give remarks. The Meadows Convocation Chorus, directed by Pamela Elrod Huffman, will provide music, accompanied by Sarah England.

The entire Convocation will be streamed over the internet via smu.edu/live. Click or tap the screen below to watch. The broadcast begins one hour before the ceremony starts.

> Download a PDF of the 103rd SMU Opening Convocation program

SMU Physics will project solar eclipse into Dallas Hall Rotunda on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017

SMU physics professors have devised a remarkable way to watch next Monday’s historic solar eclipse: They will use mirrors to turn the historic Dallas Hall Rotunda into a giant viewing chamber.

Weather permitting, Associate Professor of Physics Stephen Sekula will host for students and the public a homebrew viewing tunnel attached to a telescope on the lawn of Dallas Hall. The total eclipse of the sun will take place on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The Rotunda event is sponsored by SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and the Department Physics.

The Rotunda image and the viewing tunnel will provide crisp images of the eclipse, and also correspond to NASA’s recommendation to avoid looking directly at the sun, Sekula said. Both methods eliminate the need for certified glasses to avoid eye damage. A surge in demand has made authentic safety glasses hard to find.

“There’s no sense risking your vision, and so this way you can come out and enjoy the eclipse without damaging your eyes,” he said.

Dallas is in the secondary shadow of the eclipse, not the primary shadow, so the region will not see the total phase of the eclipse, but rather 75 percent coverage.

“That’s still quite spectacular,” Sekula said, noting that peak viewing will be around 1:09 p.m. The partial eclipse begins in Dallas at 11:40 a.m. and ends at 2:39 p.m., according to NASA.

Wherever you and your students view the 2017 solar eclipse, don’t forget to observe these safety protocols, shared by SMU Health:

On Monday, Aug. 21, a historic total solar eclipse of the sun will be partially visible in North Texas from about 11:40 a.m. to about 2:40 p.m.  NASA offers recommendations for safely viewing the event because of the potential dangers it poses to eyesight if precautions are not taken. Please see NASA.gov for information.

SMU Dedman College Solar Eclipse Event

Pulitzer Prize-winner Matthew Desmond to give public lecture at SMU Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017

This post was originally published Aug. 18, 2017 and has been updated.

Matthew Desmond

The SMU and Dallas communities are invited to a lecture by Matthew Desmond, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. The SMU Reads event takes place at 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, in McFarlin Auditorium.

Desmond, a sociologist and MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient, went into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to learn the stories of families struggling to keep even a substandard roof over their heads. The incoming Class of 2021 will discuss the book with faculty and staff members as their Common Reading on Sunday, Aug. 20, before Opening Convocation.

> More on Evicted from the SMU Forum

Desmond is principal investigator of the Milwaukee Area Renters Study, an original survey of tenants in Milwaukee’s low-income private housing sector. Currently a professor of sociology at Princeton University, he previously served as Harvard University’s John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and co-director of the Justice and Poverty Project. His work has been supported by the Ford, Russell Sage, and National Science Foundations, and his writing has appeared in The New York Times and Chicago Tribune.

He has written on educational inequality, dangerous work, political ideology, race and social theory, and the inner-city housing market. Recently, he has published on the prevalence and consequences of eviction and the low-income rental market, network-based survival strategies among the urban poor, and the consequences of new crime control policies on inner-city women; his writings have appeared in the American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review, Social Forces, and Demography.

Desmond is the author of three other books: On the Fireline: Living and Dying with Wildland Firefighters (2007), Race in America (with Mustafa Emirbayer, 2015), and The Racial Order (with Mustafa Emirbayer, 2015). He also is editor of the inaugural issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, Volumes 1 & 2: Severe Deprivation in America (2015).

After receiving his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Desmond joined the Harvard Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow. His primary teaching and research interests include urban sociology, poverty, race and ethnicity, organizations and work, social theory, and ethnography.

> Follow Matthew Desmond on Twitter @Just_Shelter

SMU Reads was created to encourage reading and support literacy in the Dallas community. Under the program, members of the community join in the University’s annual Common Reading, as chosen by the SMU selection committee. Campus and community participants are invited to take part in gatherings and events focused on the book, including a presentation by the author.

Evicted is available at a number online retailers, including Barnes & Noble. It is also available at a 10-percent discount at the SMU Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 3000 Mockingbird Lane. Call 214-768-2435 for more information.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, visit the SMU Reads homepage: smu.edu/smureads.

Save the date: SMU Fall 2017 General Faculty Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 23

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will address the University faculty at the Fall 2017 General Faculty Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 23 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The meeting will begin at 3:45 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Theater, after a reception beginning at 3 p.m. in Centennial Hall and the Theater foyer.

Newly tenured faculty will receive their regalia during the meeting. In addition, 2017-18 Faculty Senate President Paul Krueger will give the Senate’s report. Provost Steven Currall will also address the meeting and announce the winner of the 2016-17 Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award from the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church.

First Impressions, lasting impact: Literary partnership completes an unfinished journey

David J. Weber

David J. Weber

When SMU historian David J. Weber died in 2010, he left behind an unfinished manuscript that would have represented a creative departure from his many academic works. One of the most distinguished and productive scholars of the American Southwest, Weber envisioned his next book, First Impressions: A Reader’s Journey to Iconic Places of the Southwest, as a new perspective on some of the Southwest’s most distinctive sites.

More than a typical travelogue, the book would bring the reader into the minds of explorers, missionaries, and travelers as they encountered and then wrote about memorable places both manmade and naturally formed, becoming the first non-natives to do so. From impressions of 15 sites in Arizona, New Mexico, southern Utah and southern Colorado, readers would gain present-day as well as historical perspectives.  The destinations would range from the gracefully sculpted rock formations of Canyon de Chelly, to the mesa fortress of Acoma Pueblo, to the conflict-ridden village of Santa Fe, described by an 18th century Franciscan as, “A rough stone set in fine metal,” referring to, “The very beautiful plain on which it sits.”

But first the journey of the unfinished manuscript would have to continue. David’s widow, Carol Weber, who had served consistently as the final reviewer of all of David’s manuscripts, knew that this project deserved a place in her husband’s legacy of eloquent and inspired scholarship. As she considered who might complete the manuscript, Carol turned to their friend, author William deBuys. Like David, Bill had received a shower of honors for his creative and scholarly works. In addition, Bill had earned the distinction of being a fellow of the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, founded in 1996 by David at SMU, where he taught for 34 years.

William deBuys

William deBuys

Over a number of these years, David and Bill grew in admiration of each other’s work. David had revolutionized contemporary understanding of borderlands history. Bill had earned a national reputation for his analyses of environmental issues threatening the Southwest. They also grew as friends sharing a deep affection for the region, its people and places. “For both of us, the Southwest has been a source of lifelong fascination, and through the vehicle of this book we hope to share it,” Bill writes in the preface of First Impressions, published by Yale University Press in August.

The production of First Impressions required some highly focused sleuthing and sifting through a bounty of materials in the three offices of David Weber – in SMU’s History Department and at the family’s homes in Dallas and in New Mexico’s Zuni Mountains, near the monumental El Morro, or Inscription Rock, so called because it bears the signatures of early explorers etched into its sandstone façade. Each of David’s offices was filled to capacity with books, research notes, correspondence, manuscripts, drafts, and computers holding the contents of David’s prolific research and writing. Carol found a hard copy of David’s table of contents and a number of chapters in different states of completion. She and Bill worked with Center for Southwest Studies staff, especially Ruth Ann Elmore, to download and decipher David’s computer files.

The Center had awarded Bill a second fellowship to work on the project.

“I chose Bill because I knew he was a sensitive and wonderful writer, and David felt the same way about him,” Carol said. “I couldn’t imagine any other historian finishing David’s work in a way that would have pleased David because it would be so beautifully written.”

'First Impressions' book coverIn the preface to First Impressions, Bill recalls cherished conversations with David about “the general business of making good sentences, paragraphs, and pages. David was a naturally gifted writer.”

Aside from representing his admiration for David, Bill said he took on the project because he “thought the concept of the book was brilliant and offered a truly exciting and informative way to explore the great places of the region. David, ever the professor, had a wonderful pedagogical purpose: He wanted to present primary sources — original historical documents and images — to people who otherwise might be unlikely to encounter them. In this I completely concurred. It is a form of stealth teaching — and wonderful fun at the same time.”

The result of their literary partnership is a book that seamlessly combines the poetry and precision of both writers. Bill’s numerous books include River of Traps: A New Mexico Mountain Life, a finalist for the nonfiction Pulitzer Prize in 1991; Enchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range; A Great Aridness: Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest; and The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of the Earth’s Rarest Creatures. In September 2017 he is receiving the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, for outstanding writing and literature.

David’s works include 27 books, many of them recognized as path-breaking in the field by such organizations as the American Historical Association. The Mexican Frontier, 1821-1846: The American Southwest Under Mexico itself won six awards. Two governments gave David the highest honor they can bestow on foreigners. King Juan Carlos of Spain named him to the Real Orden de Isabel la Católica, the Spanish equivalent of a knighthood. Mexico named him to the Orden Mexicana del Águila Azteca (the Order of the Aztec Eagle). He was one of a few U.S. historians elected to the Mexican Academy of History. Closer to home, in 2007 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Upon release of First Impressions, Carol told Bill: “It was my love for David that prompted me to ask you if you would finish the book, and it was such an act of love for David, I think, that you willingly took so much time out of your life to finish it for David and our family.  Somehow David’s life now seems complete.”

Complete – but not finished. Now, First Impressions, with William deBuys, adds to the lasting legacy of David J. Weber and the rich literary resources of their beloved Southwest.

— Written by Patricia LaSalle-Hopkins

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