Learn more about social entrepreneurship at the 2015 SMU Social Innovation Forum Tuesday, April 7

SMU Social Innovation Forum 2015SMU will host an opportunity to learn from and network with experts in social entrepreneurship at its 4th annual Social Innovation Forum and Expo from 2-4:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 in the Owen Arts Center.

The event, presented by SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and Hegi Family Career Development Center, will feature two panel discussions with a dozen experts who are developing solutions to pressing social issues. The panels will be led by Trey Bowles, adjunct lecturer at the Meadows School and co-founder and CEO of The Dallas Entrepreneur Center.

Panelists will include representatives from the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas, Warby Parker, Hari Mari, Social Impact Architects and other leading Dallas organizations and social entrepreneurs.

The discussions will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in O’Donnell Hall, 2130 Owen Arts Center, followed by a networking reception and Social Impact Expo from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre lobby.

The expo, which is co-sponsored by SMU’s Engaged Learning office, will allow participants to network with panelists, visit with social enterprises, entrepreneurs and nonprofits in the DFW region, sample products, and learn about jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities that have a positive impact on the community. Expo participants include Goodwill Industries, CitySquare Americorps, Akola Project and many others.

Admission is free; advance registration is requested. Social Innovation Forum attendees can register online.

For more information, contact Abigail Smith, 214-768-3425.

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SMU geothermal scientist Maria Richards named 2016 president-elect of the Geothermal Resources Council

Maria Richards, SMU Geothermal LaboratoryMaria Richards, coordinator of the SMU Geothermal Laboratory in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, has been named president-elect of the Geothermal Resources Council. She will become the 26th president of the global energy organization beginning in 2017, and the first woman president in its history.

Richards has been at the forefront of SMU’s geothermal energy research for more than a decade, and the University’s mapping of North American geothermal resources is considered the baseline for U.S. geothermal energy exploration. SMU’s Conference on Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas fields, which Richards directs, is pioneering the transition of oil and gas fields to electricity-producing systems by harnessing waste heat and fluids.

“The Geothermal Resources Council is a tremendous forum for expanding ideas about geothermal exploration and technology related to this commonly overlooked source of energy provided by the Earth,” Richards said. “It’s a great opportunity for educating people about an energy source that covers the whole gamut – from producing electricity for industries, to reducing our electricity consumption with direct-use applications, to even cooling our homes.”

“This also is a unique occasion for me to encourage and mentor young women to participate in the sciences throughout their careers and get involved in leadership roles,” she added.

SMU’s seventh international geothermal energy conference and workshop is scheduled for May 18-20, 2015, on the Dallas campus. Designed to reach a broad audience, from the service industry to reservoir engineers, “Power Plays: Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields,” is an opportunity for oil and gas industry professionals to connect with the geothermal and waste-heat industries to build momentum. The conference is a platform for networking with attendees from all aspects of project development. Presentations will highlight reservoir topics from flare gas usage to induced seismicity and will address new exploration opportunities, including offshore sites in the eastern United States.

Find information and registration for SMU’s 2015 Geothermal Energy Conference: smu.edu/geothermal

Richards’ projects at SMU’s Geothermal Laboratory vary from computer-generated temperature-depth maps for Google.org to on-site geothermal exploration of the volcanic islands in the Northern Mariana Islands. Along with Cathy Chickering Pace, Richards coordinates the SMU Node of the National Geothermal Data System funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Richards has previously served on the Geothermal Resources Council Board of Directors and was chair of the Outreach Committee in 2011-12. She is also a Named Director of the 2015 Board for the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TREIA).

Richards holds an M.S. degree in physical geography from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a B.S. in environmental geography from Michigan State University.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

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SMU sponsors musical tribute to African American author-activist Margaret Walker Alexander on Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Randy Klein and Aurelia Williams

Randy Klein, at piano, and Aurelia Williams

Members of the SMU community are invited to a free performance of “For My People: A New Musical Work” on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 7 p.m. at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, Clarence Muse Café Theater, 1309 Canton Street, Dallas.

Celebrating the centennial of the birth of acclaimed African American poet-scholar-activist Margaret Walker Alexander (1915-1998), the event will feature the opus’ author, Randy Klein, joined by Aurelia Williams and the Heart and Soul Singers performing in honor of SMU’s first sponsorship of the annual College Language Association (CLA) convention (April 8-11 in Dallas).

Margaret Walker Alexander

Margaret Walker Alexander

Co-sponsors of the musical tribute are SMU’s Department of English and Ethnic Studies Program in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences along with the University’s Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, in partnership with the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, the College Language Association and Dr. Maryemma Graham of the University of Kansas.

“This is not only CLA’s 75th convention and the centennial of Dr. Margaret Walker Alexander’s birth, but it’s also the centennial of SMU’s opening,” says CLA host committee chair Darryl Dickson-Carr, associate professor of English in SMU’s Dedman College.

“Walker Alexander was the direct inspiration for The Black Academy of Arts and Letters, as its founder, Curtis King, was her student and protégé,” Dickson-Carr says. “The CLA’s first visit to Texas in 50 years coincides with remarkable events in Dallas and SMU’s histories, and features the work of some of its best and most celebrated students.”

Dylan Smith

Dylan Smith

Synthia Green

Synthia Green

SMU will host a private reception for CLA members at Café 43 in the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. University leaders set to greet CLA guests include Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero, Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies James Quick and Department of English Chair Nina Schwartz.

A jazz trio led by Dylan Smith of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will provide entertainment, as will Meadows student Synthia Green.

SMU English Department graduate students will serve as CLA convention volunteers.

For more details about the CLA and related events, contact Dr. Dickson-Carr.

Written by Denise Gee

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Harold Stanley named 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar

Harold Stanley, SMU Engaged Learning Expo 2013, photo by Kim Leeson

SMU Associate Provost Harold Stanley speaking at the University’s 2013 Engaged Learning Expo. Stanley, the Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy in Dedman College, will be a 2015-16 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar. Photo credit: SMU/Kim Leeson.

Harold Stanley, Geurin-Pettus Distinguished Chair in American Politics and Political Economy and SMU associate provost, has been named a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar for the 2015-16 academic year.

Stanley, who was named SMU’s interim provost and vice president for academic affairs in late March, joins 12 other outstanding scholars in the liberal arts and sciences from institutions including Columbia, Princeton, Stanford, Yale, NYU, UCLA, Penn State, Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Boston University and the Institute for Signifying Scriptures.

Past Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars have included U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Pulitzer Prize-winning writers and journalists, and Nobel Prize winners. Stanley is the third SMU faculty member to be selected for the program: Annemarie Weyl Carr, University Distinguished Professor Emerita of Art History, participated in 1986-87; and William F. May, Professor Emeritus and Maguire Chair in Ethics, served in 1999-2000.

“It’s an honor to be in such distinguished company and a delight to take part in this exchange of ideas with other colleges and universities,” Stanley said. “I look forward to meeting my hosts and participating in their intellectual lives.”

During the 2015-16 academic year, Stanley will travel to eight institutions that house Phi Beta Kappa chapters, spending two days on each campus. He will meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the academic community and the general public.

Stanley’s research focuses on American government, particularly on Southern and Latino politics as well as presidential elections. He has written three books: Vital Statistics on American Politics, now in its 15th edition (CQ Press); Voter Mobilization and the Politics of Race: The South and Universal Suffrage, 1952-1984 (Praeger, 1987), and Senate vs. Governor, Alabama 1971: Referents for Opposition in a One-Party Legislature (University of Alabama Press, 1975).

He has also published numerous reviews, book chapters and journal articles in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and The Journal of Politics, among others.

A former president of the Southern Political Science Association, Stanley received the 2010 Outstanding Teaching in Political Science Award from Pi Sigma Alpha and the American Political Science Association.

Founded Dec. 5, 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest academic honor society. Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program has made it possible for undergraduates to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The program was created to contribute to intellectual life on campus through an exchange of ideas between Visiting Scholars and resident faculty and students.

> Visit the official Phi Beta Kappa website at pbk.org

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Calendar Highlights: April 1, 2015

OptingOutOpting Out: Balancing Obligations to God and the State: SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies presents “Opting Out: Balancing Obligations to God and the State,Wednesday, April 1, at 5:30 p.m., in Jones Great Hall. The lecture features guest speakers Hiram Sasser, Managing Director of Strategic Litigation, Liberty Institute; Marci A. Hamilton, Paul R. Verkuil Chair in Public Law, Yeshiva University; and Matthew Wilson, Associate Professor of Political Science & Tower Center Fellow, SMU. While the event is free and open to the public, guests are encouraged to RSVP to the Tower Center via email. 

The Clothesline Muse: Presented by SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts in partnership with TECO Productions, theatre performance The Clothesline Muse opens Thursday, April 2 at 7:30 p.m., in the Bishops Arts Theatre Center. The multidisciplinary theater performance transports audiences to a world where the task of washing clothes by hand is transformed with beautiful imagery, dance and song. For tickets and more information, visit the event webpage.

Good Friday: The University is closed for Good Friday, April 3. Classes will resume the following Monday, April 6.

SpringAwakeningPosterSpring Awakening: The SMU Program Council and SMU Student Theatre (SMUST) production of Spring Awakening debuts on Saturday, April 4, at 2 p.m., in the Greer Garson Theatre. Featuring 35 students from various majors, this full-scale production is rehearsed and put together on the SMU campus in only 24 hours. Tickets to Spring Awakening are free. For more information, visit the Spring Awakening Facebook page.

Social Innovation Forum & Expo: SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and Hegi Family Career Development Center presents the forth annual Social Innovation Forum and Expo on Tuesday, April 7 from 2-4:30 p.m., in the Own Arts Center. Featuring industry experts and social media entrepreneurs, this event offers panel discussions, networking opportunities and information on Dallas-area groups developing solutions to social problems. While admission is free and open to the public, advance registration is required. For more information, email Meadows Assistant Director Abigail Smith.

Tate Lecture: SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series presents co-anchor of ABC News “Good Morning America” Robin Roberts on Tuesday, April 7. The event will start with the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:45 p.m., in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, followed by The Ebby Halliday Companies Lecture at 8 p.m., in McFarlin Auditorium. For more information, visit the Tate Lecture Series webpage.

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SMU to honor three global leaders with honorary degrees during its 100th Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, 2015

SMU has chosen three extraordinary women to receive honorary degrees at its 100th Commencement ceremony Saturday, May 16, 2015.

The honorees are Meave Leakey, standard-bearer of a family of anthropologists whose research in Africa has revealed important clues to humans’ earliest ancestors; Irene Hirano Inouye, who helped build the Japanese American National Museum and is the founding president of the U.S.-Japan Council; and Helen LaKelly Hunt, a donor-activist, author and SMU alumna whose life focus has been to empower women and educate people about the value of healthy, intimate relationships. All three will receive from SMU the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa.

Information about symposia presented by the honorary degree recipients will be released at a later date.

“One of the great privileges for SMU is conferring honorary degrees upon recipients who have excelled in their fields and contributed to society in diverse ways,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “They show our students how to change the world through education, service and philanthropy – and also illustrate the value of lives well-lived.”

> The history of honorary degrees at SMU, including honorees by name, year and degree

Meave LeakeyMEAVE LEAKEY has established herself as one of the most visible and distinguished scientists in a highly competitive profession through her field and laboratory research in paleoanthropology. Her research interests focus on East African mammalian evolution over the past 30 million years, with emphasis on primate and human evolution. Together with colleagues, Leakey has described new species of early apes, monkeys and human ancestors, including Australopithecus anamensis, the earliest known australopithecine (an extinct genus of early African hominids), and Kenyanthropus platyops (also extinct, the species name means “flat-faced man of Kenya”). These findings provide evidence of diversity in the human fossil record 3.5 million years ago.

Having retired as head of the Department of Palaeontology at the National Museums of Kenya, Leakey is now a research associate in the museum’s Palaeontology Division. She also is a research professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Stony Brook, New York, and director of Plio-Pleistocene research at the Turkana Basin Institute, Nairobi. In 2002, she was named a National Geographic “Explorer-in-Residence” in honor of the 50-year relationship between the National Geographic Society and the Leakey family.

Leakey is author of numerous groundbreaking scientific publications in prestigious journals and the author of several monographs documenting her research in Turkana. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including two honorary degrees from Stony Brook University and the University College of London, and was a recipient of the Academy of Achievement Award in 2004. In 2011 she was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society of London. In 2013 she was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., as a Foreign Associate, and the same year she became a Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences.

Leakey received a B.S. in zoology and marine zoology from the University of North Wales in 1965 and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of North Wales in 1968.

Irene Hirano Inouye IRENE HIRANO INOUYE became the executive director of T.H.E. (To Help Everyone) Clinic in Los Angeles at the age of 27. Founded by medical volunteers, T.H.E. aspired to bring affordable healthcare to poor and uninsured women. In 1988, she was appointed president and CEO of the Japanese-American National Museum (JANM), which opened in 1992. She would develop it as one of the preeminent resources in America on the immigrant experience. Its high-profile exhibitions, community connections, research projects and eventual affiliation with the Smithsonian have helped the museum build a reputation for excellence while encouraging young people to acknowledge and connect with their Japanese-American heritage. Inouye has played a foundational role in getting the World War II Japanese internment camp experience into history textbooks, and in gaining public attention for exceptional Japanese-Americans.

Inouye became the founding president of the U.S.-Japan Council (USJC) in 2008, the same year she married U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. The USJC builds upon her work at the Japanese American National Museum and seeks to create networks of Japanese-Americans at the top levels of business, government, education, and the non-profit sector. After the 2011 tsunami in Japan, she became the guiding force in the Tomodachi Initiative, which supports Japan’s recovery from the disaster as a joint project of the USJC and the American embassy in Tokyo.

Inouye currently serves as chair of the board of the Ford Foundation, and she previously chaired the board of the Kresge Foundation. She also serves on the executive boards of Independent Sector, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Smithsonian Institution, the American Association of Museums, and the President’s Committee.

Inouye earned two degrees in Public Administration from USC: her B.S. in 1970 and her M.P.A. in 1972.

Helen LaKelly Hunt HELEN LaKELLY HUNT is a donor-activist, author and SMU alumna who has been recognized for both her work for healthy marriages and family and her efforts in helping to build the global women’s funding movement. She is the founder of The Sister Fund, a private foundation that supports women’s social, political, economic and spiritual empowerment. Hunt has helped establish several other organizations, including Dallas Women’s Foundation, New York Women’s Foundation, Women’s Funding Network and Women Moving Millions.

Her books include Faith and Feminism: A Holy Alliance, as well as seven books on intimate relationships and parenting co-authored with her husband, Harville HendrixTheir joint publications have sold more than two million copies and have been translated into more than 50 languages. With Hendrix, Hunt helped to develop Imago Relationships International, a nonprofit organization formed as a guide for transforming relationships and building better marriages. Imago Therapy is practiced by more than 1,900 therapists in more than 20 countries. Over the last two years, they have been disseminating in South Dallas and West Dallas “Safe Conversations” skills through a program called Family Wellness Dallas!

In recognition of her leadership in the women’s funding movement, Hunt has received Gloria Steinem’s Women of Vision Award from the Ms. Foundation for Women, the Equity Leadership Award from Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW), the National Creative Philanthropy Award from the National Network of Women’s Funds, and the Laura Parsons Pratt Award for Outstanding Achievement on Behalf of Women and Children from the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies. In addition, Hunt has been an Honoree of the Center for the Elimination of Violence in the Family and has been inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

Hunt received three degrees from SMU: a B.A. in Secondary Education in 1971, an M.L.A. in 1976 and an M.A in Counseling in 1979. Hunt earned a Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary in 2004, her focus of study being the religious foundations of American Feminism.

> Learn more about SMU’s Commencement ceremonies, events and traditions at smu.edu/commencement

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Meadows School announces $1.5 million challenge grant during 2015 ‘Meadows at the Meyerson’ benefit

Conductor and SMU Prof. Paul Phillips with mezzo soprano Michaela Martens, Meadows at the Meyerson, March 31, 2015

Martha Raley Peak Endowed Centennial Chair Paul Phillips conducts SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra as guest artist mezzo soprano Michaela Martens sings during the 2015 “Meadows at the Meyerson” benefit concert at Dallas’ Meyerson Symphony Center.

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts announced a major new challenge grant during the most successful “Meadows at the Meyerson” concert in the event’s 22-year history on Tuesday, March 31, 2015.

A $1.5 million challenge grant from the Morris Foundation will support the school’s Meadows Scholars Program. Led by SMU alumnus Ken Morris ’72 and his wife Linda of Carefree, Arizona, the foundation will match gifts designated to the Meadows Scholars endowment by Thursday, December 31, 2015.  

Education is a primary focus of the Morris Foundation, and the family has provided significant support to SMU over the years, including gifts for the Information Technology Center in Blanton Student Services Building, Campus Technology Initiative, the Kenneth R. and Linda A. Morris BBA Scholars Endowment Fund, MBA Scholarships and, most recently, the Morris Endowed Director of the Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship in the Cox School of Business.

> $2 million gift to SMU establishes endowed directorship in Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship

Through donations and the Morris Foundation match for gifts designated to permanent endowment, the event raised over $1 million – a new record – for the Meadows Scholars Program.

The Meadows Scholars Program was launched in 2008 and provides scholarship support to applicants who meet both stringent academic and artistic criteria. The program has helped SMU successfully compete for the brightest and most talented students nationwide.

“We are deeply grateful to the Morris family for this generous commitment to enhance student quality at SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “With this challenge grant, the Meadows School of the Arts will be able to continue to build this critical scholarship program and to successfully attract the nation’s top students in the arts and communications fields.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

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Lyda Hill receives SMU’s 2015 J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award

Lyda HillLyda Hill, whose philanthropy is guided by the credo that “science is the answer,” received the 2015 J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award from SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility at a luncheon on Thursday, April 2 at Dallas’ Belo Mansion. The annual award honors a community leader who exemplifies ethical, inspiring leadership.

Hill, president of the real estate, tourism and venture investment firm LH Holdings, and granddaughter of oilman H. L. Hunt, has spent her life dedicated to what she calls “balancing profit with a purpose.”

“I really believe that whether we’re talking hunger, poverty, cancer, you name it, science is where we’ll find the answers,” she told Philanthropy in 2014, adding that her focus is on “things that are going to make a big difference to a lot of people for a long time.”

“Over the past several years Lyda’s zest for adventure has been surpassed by the sheer joy she derives from making transformational gifts to organizations and causes dedicated to making Dallas a better community in which to live and work,” says Bobby B. Lyle ’67, vice-chairman of the Maguire Center advisory board, longtime SMU trustee and namesake of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering.

Lyle says Hill “has set audacious goals for her philanthropy,” with interests ranging from education to medical research to healthcare and human services for the elderly. “In whatever she undertakes, she sets the bar high and leads by example,” he says. “Many of her gifts are given quietly, without fanfare. Others are legendary. And all are having a tremendous positive impact on lives throughout our city and across the nation.”

In 2010 Hill became a member of The Giving Pledge, created by Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett to encourage the world’s wealthiest individuals and families to commit a majority of their wealth to philanthropy. Hill has pledged to donate all of her assets to charity, the bulk of it during her lifetime. She was recognized in 2013 as the only single woman on the Philanthropy list of most generous donors, having now given an estimated hundreds of millions of dollars to “game-changing” charities primarily focused on life-sciences research.

Rita Kirk, director of the Maguire Center, notes that Hill quotes Walt Disney on her foundation’s website. “Like Disney, Lyda Hill makes it ‘fun to do the impossible.’ She understands the strategic use of her resources, the magic created when people dare to dream greatly, and the impact strategic giving can have on our community – and even the world.”

Hill was a founder of the Oklahoma Breast Care Center as well as Remeditex Ventures, which supports early biomedical research by universities and health care institutions “that can take promising advances to the marketplace quickly,” she says.

Her philanthropic support of the life sciences includes her $50 million gift pledged to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Moon Shots Program, which aims to eliminate cancer through improved cancer-detection techniques and therapeutic treatments that Hill, a breast cancer survivor, hopes will “break cancer’s code.”

Hill also has donated $20 million to her alma mater, The Hockaday School, to fund a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) program; $10 million to the “I Stand for Parkland” capital campaign; and $6 million in pledges to the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and the Center for Brain Health to help military service members and veterans recover from traumatic brain injuries.

Hill has helped a variety of environmental/marine conservation efforts through the Nature Conservancy and Pew Charitable Trusts. She also has supported such community-revitalization projects as Klyde Warren Park, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge (named for her mother) and The Trinity Trust.

Past winners of the J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award, now in its 18th year, include Gail Griffin Thomas, Nancy Ann & Ray Hunt, Walter J. Humann, Ruth S. Altshuler, Bob Buford, Ronald G. Steinhart, Michael M. Boone, Zan W. Holmes Jr., Roger Staubach, Caren Prothro, Tom Luce, Ron Anderson, Jack Lowe Jr., William T. Solomon, Stanley H. Marcus, Charles C. Sprague and Curtis W. Meadows Jr.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from SMU News

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Arts and civic leader Caren Prothro to be honored in 2015 “Meadows at the Meyerson” Tuesday, March 31

Caren Protho

Caren Protho will be honored in the 2015 “Meadows at the Meyerson” benefit concert, presented by SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will honor arts and civic leader and SMU trustee Caren Prothro in “Meadows at the Meyerson,” 8 p.m., Tuesday, March 31, in the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora Street in Dallas.

The 22nd annual benefit concert will feature the critically acclaimed Meadows Symphony Orchestra. The 2015 event chair is Heather Furniss, and the honorary chairs are Sarah and Ross Perot Jr.

In a presentation of Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (“The Song of the Earth”) led by conductor Paul Phillips, the Meadows Symphony will be accompanied by two renowned opera singers – mezzo soprano Michaela Martens and tenor Thomas Studebaker. Based on six 8th-century Chinese poems, the hour-long work was composed after Mahler learned he was terminally ill and is known as the finest part of his artistic legacy.

“Meadows at the Meyerson is the embodiment of our values as an arts organization in the community. We present the critically recognized Meadows Symphony Orchestra in our city’s Arts District and raise money for scholarships to bring even more talented students from around the world to Dallas,” said Sam Holland, dean of the Meadows School of the Arts. “We are especially delighted this year to honor Caren Prothro, long a champion for arts and cultural excellence in our city. We are also grateful for her longstanding support of the Meadows Scholars Program, which allows Meadows to compete with the top arts and communications programs in the U.S., attracting prospective students to Dallas who might otherwise wind up in Boston, New York, Chicago, or L.A.

SMU's Meadows Symphony Orchestra in Dallas' Meyerson Symphony Center

SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra will perform in the 2015 “Meadows at the Meyerson” event Tuesday, March 31, in Dallas’ Meyerson Symphony Center.

“Many of these academically gifted artists, or ‘smartists’ as we like to call them, will choose to stay in Dallas after graduation, building Dallas’ intellectual capital and momentum as one of the most culturally dynamic cities in the United States.”

This year’s honoree, Caren Prothro, is an active supporter of the arts, higher education and programming addressing the needs of at-risk youth. A previous chair of SMU’s Board of Trustees, Prothro currently serves as co-chair of SMU’s Campaign for the Second Century with a historic goal of $1 billion to support endowment and capital expansion. In 2015, she will begin her service as a member of The George W. Bush Foundation.

Tickets to the Meadows at the Meyerson concert are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors, and $17 for students and SMU faculty and staff. For tickets, contact the Meadows Box Office at 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Read the full story from SMU News

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Princeton Review ranks SMU Guildhall #3 among graduate game-design programs in 2015

The Guildhall at SMU exterior, February 2015The Guildhall at SMU maintains its third spot among the world’s top graduate game-design programs in The Princeton Review’s sixth annual report, published Tuesday, March 24, 2015.

The University of Utah was ranked at #1 on the graduate school list in the Review’s 2015 report; UCF’s Florida Interactive Entertainment Academy ranked #2. At #3, The Guildhall ranks above the University of Southern California (#4), Rochester Institute of Technology (#6), New York University (#9), MIT (#11) and Ohio State (#18), and higher than two other top-25 graduate programs in Texas: UT-Dallas (#12) and Texas A&M (#22).

> Read The Princeton Review‘s full 2015 game design program rankings

The Review selected the schools based on its 2014-15 survey of 150 institutions in the United States, Canada and abroad offering game design coursework and/or degrees. The 50-question survey asked schools to report on a range of topics, from academic offerings and faculty credentials to graduates’ employment and professional achievements. In addition, the Review weighted more than 60 data points to make its assessments, with criteria focusing on curriculum, facilities, technology and career services.

“Being in the top three schools is a tribute to faculty with deep experience, bright and motivated students, industry support, and a commitment to continual improvement,” said Gary Brubaker, director of The Guildhall at SMU.

The Princeton Review’s reporting partner, PC Gamer magazine, will include a section on the top schools in its May 2015 issue. The issue will feature information on degree programs, class offerings, events, prominent professors, and alumni. The print edition will be available on newsstands Tuesday, March 31.

> Visit The Guildhall at SMU online

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