Tune In

Tune In: Dean Marc Christensen on KERA’s ‘Think’ Jan. 29, 2014

Marc Christensen, dean of Lyle School of Engineering at SMUMarc Christensen, dean of SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering, will be part of a distinguished panel discussing the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education on KERA 90.1 FM Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014. Christensen will join Microsoft Chief Technology Officer Cameron Evans and Kristin Larimore, strategic engagement leader with GE Capital Equipment Finance, on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Christensen is a DARPA Young Faculty Award winner and has been recognized at SMU with the Gerald J. Ford Research Fellowship and the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Award.

Listen live at kera.org/listen

Tune In: Meadows Museum and its Prado partnership

As SMU’s Meadows Museum approaches its 50th anniversary in 2015, the University has created a video exploring its artistic and academic partnership with Madrid’s Museo del Prado.

Enjoy the interviews, and the art, in stunning high definition by clicking the YouTube screen – or click here to watch SMU’s Meadows-Prado video in a new windowvideo

By | 2013-11-13T12:30:55+00:00 November 13, 2013|Categories: Tune In|Tags: , , , , |

Tune In: SMU’s Andrew Graybill on KERA’s ‘Think’ Nov. 7, 2013

Andrew R. GraybillAndrew Graybill, associate professor of history and director of SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, will discuss changing notions of racial identity in the West on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Graybill will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

Tune in at kera.org/listen

Graybill’s new book, The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), follows the story of Montana fur trader Malcolm Clarke and his Piegan Blackfeet wife, Coth-co-co-na, focusing on the 1870 Marias Massacre – set in motion by the murder of Malcolm Clarke and in which Clarke’s two sons rode with the Second U.S. Cavalry to kill their own blood relatives.

In his examination of this historical tragedy, Graybill sheds light on how racial attitudes changed from the 19th century, in which Native-white marriages proliferated, to the 20th, in which such families often encountered virulent prejudice.

Visit SMU’s Clements Center online at smu.edu/swcenter

Tune In: Tower Center’s Joshua Rovner on ‘Think’ Oct. 30, 2013

Joshua RovnerJoshua Rovner, director of studies in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will discuss how U.S. strategy in national security and defense is affected by budget restrictions on KERA 90.1 FM Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. Rovner will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the noon-1 p.m. hour.

> Tune in at kera.org/listen

Rovner’s “Think” appearance ties in with the Tower Center’s 6th annual national security conference Oct. 30-31. The proceedings will emphasize emerging regional threats and national security under conditions of budget austerity.

“The Tower Center National Security Conference brings together a stellar group of senior military officers, policymakers and academic security specialists who can speak to the big picture as well as the nuts and bolts of the defense budget,” says Rovner, who also serves as the University’s John Goodwin Tower Distinguished Chair in International Politics and National Security. “We hope to encourage a serious discussion about the future of international security, the range of U.S. strategic responses and the difficult choices that will be necessary under fiscal austerity.”

> Learn more about SMU’s 2013 Tower Center National Security Conference

Tune In: Experiencing SMU game day ‘Down On The Boulevard’

SMU celebrated its 13th year of The Boulevard during the season-opening football game against Texas Tech Friday, Sept. 6, 2013.

A new video by Myles Taylor of SMU News captures the fun, spirit and pageantry of the University’s pre-game festivities – which Southern Living magazine named one of “The South’s Best Tailgates” in 2012.

Click the YouTube screen to enjoy the video, or click here to watch “SMU Boulevard” in a new windowvideo

By | 2013-09-30T11:52:13+00:00 September 24, 2013|Categories: Sports, Tune In|Tags: , , , , , |

Tune In: SMU law grad, anti-doping leader talks with KERA Aug. 19

Anti-Doping Agency CEO Travis Tygart

Travis Tygart, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO and SMU Dedman School of Law graduate

U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO and Dedman School of Law alumnus Travis Tygart will speak on KERA Public Radio’s “Think” at 1 p.m. CT Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. Tygart, who led the investigation into the doping case against cyclist Lance Armstrong, will talk with “Think” host Krys Boyd about the pressures athletes face, advancements in anti-doping detection, and the future of sports.

> Listen to Travis Tygart on KERA at 90.1 FM or via live streaming: kera.org/listen

Tygart will discuss “Playing Fair and Winning: An Inside View on Ethics, Value and Integrity” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 27 in McFarlin Auditorium, sponsored by the Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility as part of this year’s Delta Gamma Lecture in Values and Ethics. The event is free and open to the public, but guests must RSVP online or by calling 214-768-4255.

Earlier that day, Tygart will discuss the “Legal and Ethical Lessons Learned Through USADA’s Pro Cycling Investigation” at a special lecture with SMU Dedman School of Law students.

> Read more from SMU News

Tune In: The constitutional conundrum of the No Fly List

Most people are familiar with the No Fly List, part of the Secure Flight program run by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). What most don’t realize, however, is how similar that list is to a system used more than 50 years ago – one ultimately deemed unconstitutional.

Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists (University of Michigan Press) combines history, policy analysis and the law, beginning with an introduction to the No Fly List’s intellectual ancestor: Ruth B. Shipley. Her grandmotherly appearance belied the immense power she wielded as chief of the U.S. State Department Passport Office from 1928 to 1955, when she almost single-handedly decided which Americans could travel outside the country and which would be kept at home.

Author Jeffrey Kahn (pictured left), an associate professor in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, writes that “Mrs. Shipley’s ghost” now permeates a massive computerized system that diffuses her authority across multiple agencies – but still denies due process and infringes on citizens’ constitutionally protected rights. He discusses his book with KERA Radio in an interview scheduled to air from 1-2 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, 2013. Listen on your radio at 90.1 FM, or click here to listen on your computer or other electronic device.

> Read more about Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost from SMU News

Former Colombia president Álvaro Uribe delivers Tate Lecture May 7

Uribe

The 58th President of Colombia,  Álvaro Uribe, visits SMU Tuesday, May 7 for the last lecture of the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Willis M. Tate Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The 2013-14 Tate Lecture season will be announced at the beginning of this event.

Uribe had a history of public service and politics before serving as President of Colombia (2002-10). He got his start in 1976 as head of the Real Estate Office of the Public Works Department of Medellín, the following year he was Secretary General of  the Labor Ministry and from 1980-82 he was head of the Civil Aviation Department. Uribe served his final positions in Medellín as mayor in 1982 and city councilman from 1984-1986.

Uribe was elected Governor of the department of Antioquia for 1995-97 and was elected Senator for 1986-1990 and 1990-94. His work in Antioquia focused on schooling opportunities for students and healthcare for the poor; he received the Star Senator, Senator with the Best Programs and Best Senator awards.

> Follow Álvaro Uribe on Twitter @AlvaroUrbieVel

Campaignuribevelez

Photo from Uribe’s campaign, “firm hand, big heart” (c/o)

Uribe was elected President of Colombia in 2002 and was re-elected in 2006; he was the first president to be consecutively re-elected in Colombia in over a century. He is recognized for transforming the “failed state”; while he was in office homicides and kindnappings were dramatically reduced. In 2009, George W. Bush awarded President Uribe a Presidential Medal of Freedom “for his work to improve the lives of (his) citizens and for (his) efforts to promote democracy, human rights and peace abroad.”

In fall 2010, after the end of Uribe’s presidency, he came to the United States and spent a year at Georgetown University. He was the Distinguished Scholar in the Practice of Global Leadership at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. During this year he taught students in different disciplines and conducted seminars. In 2012 News Corporation welcomed Uribe to the Board of Directors.

Uribe received his degree in law from Universidad de Antioquia and his post-graduate degree from Harvard University in Management and Administration. He currently lives in Colombia with his wife and two sons.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU faculty, staff and students may attend for free (with ID) if seats become available. It is recommended to get to McFarlin at 7 p.m., seats are filled on a first come first served basis.

Uribe will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 7 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Uribe a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @AlvaroUrbieVel and the hashtag #SMUtate.

Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

Tune In: SMU welcomes the Bush Library on Founders’ Day 2013

The 43rd president of the United States was the unadvertised guest of honor Friday, April 19, 2013 at an outdoor ceremony welcoming the George W. Bush Presidential Center to campus. More than 3,000 SMU alumni, students, faculty and staff cheered and waved as Bush strode to the speaker’s platform and later expressed his thanks to the University.

“Laura, SMU class of 1968, and I are thrilled with our association with Southern Methodist University,” Bush said. “We had high expectations about the collaborative effort and the joint programs. Those expectations have been exceeded in a very short period of time.”

SMU is preparing to welcome the worldwide visitors who will attend dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Center events on campus April 24-26. Click the YouTube screen to watch the welcome event video, or visit this link to open video of SMU’s welcome ceremony for the Bush Presidential Center in a new windowvideo

> Read more about the welcome event from SMU News
> Find complete information (parking, traffic and more) on the Bush Library opening

SMU celebrates a decade of Relay for Life April 12, 2013

Relay For Life come back to the Boulevard for its 10th year on Friday, April 12, 2013. This year’s event theme, “Cheers to 100 Years of More Birthdays,” recognizes the centennials being celebrated by both SMU and the American Cancer Society. Together they will celebrate the lives saved during those 100 years and set a goal to finish the fight and find a cure in the next 100 years.

SMU student and Relay for Life Director of Communications Taylor Lack says she relays because “come this October, I will be 13 years cancer-free. I look forward to celebrating many more healthy birthdays in my life.”

Friday activities kick off at 5 p.m., with the opening ceremony scheduled for 6 p.m., including both a survivors and caregivers lap at 6:30 p.m. The traditional luminaria ceremony is at 9 p.m., in which lanterns are lit in memory or honor of a person with cancer. (Luminarias can be purchased prior to the event.) Each is personalized with a name, photo, message or drawing. A Fight Back ceremony at midnight recognizes the emotional commitment the fight against cancer entails, not only for the patients but also loved ones and communities.

The 24-hour relay comes to a close at 5 a.m. It’s a time to celebrate and remember the commitment participants made to continue the fight all year long.

There will be a survivors’ dinner on Thursday, Mar. 21, as well as during the event. The dinner is at Gordon Biersch, and survivors on campus can contact Alex Philipson for more information.

In addition to remembering and honoring the fight against cancer, Relay for Life helps to raise money for the American Cancer Society. “It is thanks to the selfless work of ACS, and the money raised by events like Relay, that cancer patients are surviving and thriving,” Lack says.

Last year SMU RFL raised $140,000; this year’s goal is $158,000. The SMU group has raised $55,753.42 thus far. The 2012-13 Relay for Life Board is the top fund-raising team with $21,823.01; Kappa Alpha Theta follows with $10,240 and Pi Beta Phi rounds out the top three teams with $7,325 raised. For more information on creating a team, contact Katie Schaible. The final team meeting is March 26, 2013.

Relay for Life began in Tacoma, Washington due to the initiative of one man, Dr. Gordy Klatt. In May 1985, he ran a track for 24 hours and with the support of his friends, family and the community raised $27,000. Relay for Life is now the largest nonprofit activity in the world; it takes place in more than 20 countries and has raised more than $4 billion to fight cancer.

For more information or to donate to the cause visit the Relay for Life site or SMU RFL Facebook.

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