News

SMU Chemistry now accepting applications for new Ph.D. degree in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry

ManeFrame supercomputer at SMUSMU’s Department of Chemistry seeks to meet a high demand for well-trained computational and theoretical chemistry professionals with a new doctoral program. The department is now accepting applications for its Ph.D. program in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry.

The four-year, 66-unit degree offers “an intensive and success-oriented education in computational and theoretical chemistry, with the goal to prepare students for a future career in academia or private industry,” according to the department. Mandatory courses include advanced computational chemistry, computer-assisted drug design, Hartree-Fock Density Functional Theory and electron correlations methods; and models and concepts in chemistry, symmetry and group theory.

A minimum of five publications is expected for the thesis defense. The degree program also features extensive training in how to write a paper and prepare for presentations, interviews and a future career path.

The American Chemical Society’s ChemCensus 2010 reports that the number of computational chemists with a Ph.D. degree working in industry nearly doubled over 20 years, from 55,200 in 1990 to 109,500 in 2010. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that there will be a further annual increase of at least 15 percent until 2022, making this the fastest-growing sector among all chemistry-related jobs.

For more information, contact Dr. Dieter Cremer or Dr. Elfi Kraka.

> Learn more about SMU’s Ph.D. in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry online

March 2, 2017|News|

Wendy Davis to deliver Emmie V. Baine Lecture at 2017 SMU Women’s Symposium Wednesday, March 8

Wendy Davis, 2017 SMU Women's Symposium speakerWendy Davis, former Texas state senator and 2014 candidate for Texas governor, will deliver the keynote address in SMU’s 2017 Women’s Symposium Wednesday, March 8.

“We invited Wendy Davis to be our keynote speaker because she was a major advocate for women during her time in the Texas Senate and during her gubernatorial campaign,” said Aurora Havens, Women’s Symposium co-chair and a senior engineering major. “We believe she is an inspiration to all women, especially in Texas.”

The theme of the student-planned 2017 symposium, “My Body, Not Their Politics,” will focus on the politics surrounding issues such as sexual violence, reproductive justice, and women and politics.

“The theme addresses issues women face as well as the current political climate,” Havens says. Sachi Sarwal, a junior electrical engineering major, is also co-chair.

An attorney and long-time public servant, Davis served on the Fort Worth City Council from 1999 to 2008. She represented District 10 in the Texas Senate from 2009 to 2015, but made her mark nationally with an impassioned 11-hour filibuster in June 2013 that delayed passage of a bill restricting abortion regulations in Texas.  She ran for governor on the Democratic ticket in 2014, losing to Republican Greg Abbott.

In 2016, Davis launched a new initiative, Deeds Not Words, designed to train and equip young women to make changes in their communities.

More than 500 attendees are expected to attend SMU Women’s Symposium, created in 1966 as part of the University’s commemoration of its 50th anniversary. One of the longest running events of its kind, the symposium has challenged, changed and broadened women’s perspectives on campus and in the community.

The symposium is open to the public from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Discounted registration is offered to SMU faculty, staff and students. Visit www.smu.edu/womsym for registration. Registration is requested by Wednesday, March 1, 2017.

— Nancy George

> Find more information and a complete schedule at the SMU Women’s Symposium homepage: smu.edu/womsym

February 24, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|

‘Hope or Alarm in the Age of Trump’ is next installment in SMU’s Third Rail Series on politics, Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Third Rail Series logoSMU’s Third Rail Series continues on Wednesday, March 1, 2017, with three SMU scholars discussing “Hope and Alarm in the Age of Trump.”

The participants include:

The discussion begins at 7 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center, preceded by a light coffee service at 6:30 p.m. Parking will be available on campus. The event is free; passes will be e-mailed to registered guests before the event. Seating is limited, and not guaranteed.

The Third Rail Series is cosponsored by the Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. For more information, visit SMU’s Center for Presidential History site.

Register online to attend “Hope and Alarm in the Age of Trump”

February 24, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|

Former White House press secretary Mike McCurry to speak at SMU on ‘Civil Dialogue in the Age of Trump’ Thursday, March 2, 2017

Mike McCurryFormer Bill Clinton White House press secretary Mike McCurry, now a professor at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C., will speak at SMU on “Faith, Politics and Civil Dialogue in the Age of Trump: Can the Center Hold?” at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 2, in the Vester Hughes Auditorium, Caruth Hall, Lyle School of Engineering.

The lecture is free and open to the public and will be followed by a Q&A session. The event is sponsored by SMU’s Center for Faith and Learning.

McCurry was Clinton’s press secretary from 1995-98, during the height of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. He now dedicates himself to the study and promotion of civil, inclusive dialogue among people who disagree, both in church and in politics.

“As White House press secretary during the period leading up to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, Mike McCurry was on the front lines of an administration dealing with scandal and a hostile press,” said Center for Faith and Learning director Matthew Wilson. “In this time of heightened tension and increasingly angry divisions along political, religious, and cultural lines, Mike McCurry will share his insights on how to disagree civilly and to find common ground even in the face of profound differences.”

> Visit SMU’s Center for Faith and Learning online

February 24, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|

Sylvia Barack Fishman to deliver Nate and Ann Levine Lecture during One Day Jewish University at SMU

One Day Jewish University banner, Dedman College

SMU faculty members will present mini-courses on topics ranging from “Israel: Startup Nation” to “Rhythm and Jews: Jewish Self-Expression and the Rise of the American Recording Industry” during One Day Jewish University, offered by the SMU Jewish Studies Program in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

The event takes places 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26 in Dallas Hall. Registration is free; donations to SMU’s Jewish Studies Program are welcomed. Suggested donation levels are $15 for students, $25 for seniors and $50 for adults.

Participating SMU faculty members include Mark Chancey, Religious Studies; Jeffrey Engel, History; Serge Frolov, Religious Studies; Danielle Joyner, Art History; Shira Lander, Religious Studies; Bruce Levy, English; Simon Mak, Strategy, Entrepreneurship and Business Economics; Justin Rudelson, Master of Liberal Studies Program; and Martha Satz, English.

The day culminates with the Nate and Ann Levine Lecture in Jewish Studies by sociologist Sylvia Barack Fishman, co-director of the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute and Joseph and Esther Foster Professor of Contemporary Jewish Life at Brandeis University. She will speak on “Diverse Jewish Families in 21st-Century America.”

Sylvia Barack Fishman, Brandeis UniversityProf. Fishman is the author of eight books, including Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families: Paradoxes of a Social Revolution (2015), which explores the full range of contemporary Jewish personal choices and what they mean for the American and Israeli Jewish communities today. Her recent book, The Way Into the Varieties of Jewishness, explores diverse understandings of Jewish identity, religion and culture across the centuries, from ancient to contemporary times. She has published numerous articles on the interplay of American and Jewish values, transformations in the American Jewish family, the impact of Jewish education, and American Jewish literature and film. Among other honors, Prof. Fishman received the 2014 Marshall Sklare Award from the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry.

> Find a complete schedule and registration information from the Dedman College Jewish Studies Program

February 24, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|
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